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October 21, 1980 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-21

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 21, 1980-Page 3

City may

lose $510,000'

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
The city may lose $510,000 in an-
ticipated state funding and face a
$716,000 budget deficit this year,
Assistant City Administrator Patrick
Kenney told city council members last
night. More than half of the cut state
revenue was earmarked for fire protec-
tion services.
Kenney attributed the loss of state
revenues to the recent severe downturn
in Michigan's economy.
KENNEY SAID he was not sure how
the city will absorb the revenue cut, but
he said he expects to present revised
budget recommendations to council
within four to six weeks.
Council approved a $44.4 million
balanced city budget last May, but it
was balanced only by drawing $355,300
from a $900,000 city surplus fund.
"We may have to consider using a
greater portion of the surplus," Kenney
added. City Administrator Terry

Sprenkel suggested that one way the
city may meet a drop in state revenues
would be to avoid including tax
revenues in budget estimates. "We
have a number of options, but it
wouldn't be proper to place them before
council until after the election," he
said.
SPRENKEL SAID the upcoming
election will have great ramifications
for the city both in terms of tax and
federal revenue issues.
Kenney said budget figures must be
viewed as tentative. He explained that
the uncertainty surrounding the city's
share of state and federal revenues is
based on the respective legislatures,
which have not yet allocated funds.
"We are assuming Congress will
reenact federal revenue sharing at
existing levels," Kenney said. "If
not-then we'll have severe budget
problems."
Kenney said the federal portion of the

city budget makes up "well over a
million (dollars)." He said he expects
Congress to act on the revenue sharing
program upon reconvening after the
election.
KENNEY ALSO SAID the state
budget proposed by Gov. William
Milliken calls for an approximate
$245,000 cut in state-subsidized fire
protection services.
Under a program set up in 1977, the
city receives $441,000 from the state
each year for providing fire protection
services to the University. State budget
officials are considering eliminating
the program entirely in their efforts to
bring the 1980-81 budget in line with
drastically reduced revenues.
Should the program be eliminated,
Mayor Lou Belcher said the city would
continue to pay for campus fire service
at the expense of other city projects.
Kenney indicated that after the first
quarter, most of the city budgets "are

on target."
The two major exceptions are:
" A projected $200,000 deficit in the
Parks and Recreation budget due to the
July 16 storm;
" A projected $100,000 surplus in the
Insurance account due to smaller than
anticipated premium costs for medical,
general liability, and automobile
liability insurances.
The University of M Ch ~3'*
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DRAMA
GUEST ARTIST SERIES
presents
spring.
awakening
by Frank Wedekind
et. 2-25, 8pm
Oct. 26, 2pm
in the Power Center
Tickets at P.T P. Call 764-0450
MasterChrge~ and Visa accepted

Nurses' contract talks continue

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
GEORGIA STATE Senator Julian Bond speaks about racial inequity in housing
to a crowd at a PIRGIM housing conference meeting Sunday.
Senator charges
racial housing bias

By CLAUDIA CENTOMINI
The American dream of "a house
with all the extras" will remain un-
fulfilled for many blacks because of
continued discrimination in housing,
Georgia StateSenator Julian Bond
said Sunday in the concluding
speech of PIRGIM's four-day
housing conference.
The civil rights activist said there
is an "unalterable' barrier of race"
in housing.
AT EVERY level of income,
blacks are likely to be living at a
lower standard than whites, the
three-term state senator explained
to 175 people in the Michigan League
ballroom.
"Half of black Americans live in
homes built before World War II,"
Bond said. And many of these
homes, he explained, are run down
and have inadequate heating and
plumbing.
Discrimination in housing con-
tinues, and the 1964 Civil Rights Act
still is ineffective, he said.
BOND CALLED the act
"legislative wishfulness . . . what,
should be rather than ... what must
be."
Recent federal and local
programs promoting "reinvest-
ment" and renovation of housing in
inner city neighborhoods has not

helped the residents of these areas,
Bond said.
In such cases, he explained,
developers often buy the inner city
homes for very small amounts. Af-
ter the renovations, however, only
middle class residents can afford to
move back into them, Bond said.
"HOMES are renovated ... long-
time homeowners are forced out,"
Bond said. "The replacing class is
almost always white."
The state senator also suggested
ways to remedy the situation. "We
must restructure our thinking: Old
is valuable and necessary as well,"
he said.
"If we sit back and wait passively
for the government to act in our
behalf, we are in for a long, long
wait," Bond said. He encouraged
community organizing, rent control,
new zoning laws, and demolition
projects as ways to alleviate the
housing crisis many low income
people face.
Before taking his seat in the state
senate in 1974, the 40-year-old Bond
served four terms in the Georgia
House of Representatives. The
legislator is also a journalist and an
actor; he played the part of a civil
rights lawyer in the movie Greased
Lightning.

By JULIE SELBST
University Hospital registered nurses
and hospital administrators still had
not reached a contract agreement when
negotiating teams left the bargaining
table last night after the fifteenth round
of negotiations.
Nursing spokeswoman Margot
Barron, who is also head of the nurses'
bargaining unit, would not say how
much progress has been made.
"I HAVE NOTHING to say right
now," Barron said.
Barron has repeatedly refused to
comment, and earlier expressed the
fear that a public statement made
before a ratification vote might
sabotage the contract negotiations.
University Assistant Personnel
DUTCH PAINTING
WORCHESTER, Mass. (AP)-The
Worcester Art Museum has added a
painting by William van Neiuwlandt to
its collection of 17th-century Dutch art.
The 1630 painting, titled "Laban
Searching for His Idols," is the
museum's first Dutch painting
representing a subject from the Old
Testament.
INSTANT
CASHI'
WE'RE PAYING
$1-$2 PER-DISC
FOR YOUR ALBUMS
tN GOOD SHAPE.
90RECOR DS
OPEN MON.-SAT. 10-6
209 S. STATE
769-7075

Director John Forsyth also has refused
to comment on the items being
resolved, but did venture to say that
negotiations may be more than half
over.
"In terms of issues, they're not half-
way yet," Forsyth said late last week,
"but in terms of time they may well be
more than half way."
Approximately 1,000 registered nur-
ses have been working under the terms

of their old contract, which expired
Sept. 30. In the event that a walkout
takes place, there is an unspecified con-
tingency plan which would prevent the
hospital from being understaffed, For-
syth said.
There are an additional 300 licensed
practical nurses and 200 head and
assistant head nurses at University
Hospital who are not being represented
by the six-person negotiating team.

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TONIGHT

INGMAR BERGMAN'S
THE PASSION
OF ANNA
Starring Liv Ullman,
Max vonSydow
Aud.- A, Angell Hall
Admission: $2.00

The Ann Arbor
Film Cooperative

7:00 & 9:00
presents

5)

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Introducingy
wash and wear
haircuts.
A Command Performance hair-
cut adapts the hairstyle you want
to the hair you were born with.
So even after a shampoo, our
haircut continues to help your Y
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And you continue to get all the
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No appointment necessary, ever.
Command Performance
For the looks that get the looks? 434-0325
We're brand new in the new Kroger
Center (next to Wayside Theatre) on NOW
Washtenaw, just East of US-23. OPEN
NEW STORE HOURS:
Mon., Tues., Fri. & Sat.-9-6
Wed. & Thur.-9-9

HAPPENINGS-
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-The Passion of Anna (Bergman), 7, 9 p.m., Aud.
A, Angell.
Cinema Guild-Grand Illusion (Renoir), 7,9:05 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
MEETINGS
Student Health Advisory Committee-Open meeting, 11 a.m., room 202a
Health Services.
Computing Center-Chalk talk, "Fortran Debugging for Beginners," 12:10
p.m., 1011 NIBS.
HRD-Workshop, "Life/Career Planning," register at 764-7410, 1-5 p.m.
Student Counseling Office-Dean's tea with Residence College, 3:30 p.m.,
East Quad, Greene Lounge.
Biological Research Review Comm.-4 p.m., 3087 SPH I.
English Comp. Board-"Editing and Revising" 4-6 p.m., 2553 LSA.
Organ Conference-Doctoral organ students of Michigan, 4:30 p.m., Hill:
Cooley Lectures-Franklin Zimring, "The Changing Legal World of
Adolescence: "What's going on herb?" 4 p.m., Hutchins Hall.
English-Stuart Curran, "Shelly and Keats: Adonais in Context," 4 p.m.,
Rackham West Conf. room.
Geology-Stephen Collins, "Applying Modern Geologic Methods to
Petroleum Exploration and Development;" 4 p.m., 4001 C. C. Little.
Great Lakes and Marine Environment-Susan Kilham, "Phytoplankton-
Ecology: Resources Competition and Community Structure," 4 p.m., 165
Chrysler Center.
PERFORMANCES
Musical Society-Toronto Symphony Orchestra, 8:30 p.m., Hill.
Ark-De Dannan, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
MISCELLANEOUS
Men's Volleyball Club-B-team meeting, CCRB, 6-8 p.m.
Rec. Sports-Paddleball (Co-ed) Tournament, 6:30 p.m., IMSB.
Rec. Sports-Volleyball Official's Clinic, 7:30 p.m., IMSB.
University Club-Boom Town Saloon, 8 p.m., University Club.
Intro Folk Dance Club-7-8:15 p.m., Bell Pool Mezz.
Michigan International Relations Society-mass meeting, 7 p.m., Con-
ference Room 2, Union.
MSA-meeting, 3909 Union, 7:30 p.m., and constituents' time 9 p.m.
PIRGIM-Energy Task Force, 7:30 p.m., Union, Welker Room.
His House Christian Fellowship-meeting, 7:30 p.m., League rooms D and
E.
N.O.W.-meeting, 8 p.m., First Unitarian Church.
Organ Conference XX--Ernst Leitner: Concordia Lutheran College
Chaneln 400Geddes. Rn m

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