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October 21, 1980 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-21

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/

Ninety-One Years
of
Editorial Freedom

P

Lit 41

IaiIg

SEASONAL
Cloudy with a chance of
rain or snow. High in the
low 50s.

Vol. XCI, No. 41

Copyright 1980, JThe Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Tuesday, October 21, 1980

Ten Cents

Ten Pages

I m

Tisch

plan

education

By JULIE ENGEBRECHT
If Proposal D passes next month, the
state's system of higher education will
be wiped out, according to University
economists.
The release yesterday of the
economics department analysis of
Proposal D-the Tisch tax-cut amen-
dment-was prompted by a comment
made by the proposal's author that
aired on a Detroit television station last
Saturday.
CONTRARY TO what tax cut
proponent Robert Tisch told the
television audience, no member of the
University economics department has
claimed that the Tisch tax-cut plan
wouldn't hurt the University-to the
best of the department chairman's
knowledge.
Department Chairman Frank Staf-
ford said he heard Tisch's remark on
WXYZ-TV last Saturday and was

disturbed by its implication.
Economics Prof'Harvey Brazer, the
department's specialist in state and
local government financing, predicted.
yesterday that the passage of Proposal
D would leave a figure of minus $621
million for higher education and other
state programs.
THE TISCH plan would slash local
property taxes by more than 50 percent
and force the state to make up the
losses-about $2 billion.
Tisch appeared on the television show
with proponents of the two tax-cut
proposals on the November
ballot-Proposals A and C.
In the question and answer portion of
the program, a University maintenance
worker asked Tisch to comment on
allegations that Proposal D would force
layoffs and cutbacks at the University,
according to Stafford.
After pausing to think a bit, Stafford
said, Tisch replied that a University

90
will f
'U'S
economist told him just days earlier
that the University would not be har-
med by the massive cut in state
revenues passage of the Tisch plan
would prompt.
STAFFORD SAID he became con-
cerned that voters would think the
economics department believed that
the tax plan wouldn't hurt the Univer-
sity. He said he then asked Brazer,
whose "back-of-the-envelope" analysis
was even more pessimistic than the
state's, to make his work public.
"No one I know has taken that
position," Stafford said of Tisch's
remarks. "I'd like to know the basis for
his claim."
Stafford, who-also told faculty Senate
Assembly members of Brazer's
analysis yesterday, said he asked
Business School Dean Gilbert Whitaker
if any of his faculty members might
have spoken with Tisch, but that
Whitaker didn't believe that any had.

I

nperil
t1

uny
ONE UNIVERSITY official said he
heard that Business Prof. -Paul Mc-
Cracken had been asked to support the
Tisch plan, but McCracken reportedly
declined to back Tisch because he felt
the ballot proposal was unreasonable.
An aide to Tisch said yesterday that
he was unaware that Tisch had spoken
with a University economist until the
television program aired.
Brazer said his conclusion is that
passage of Proposal D, would have a
"paralyzing effect on state gover-
nment and lead to utter chaos."
THE ECONOMICS professor said his
analysis assumes that across-the-
board budget decreases affecting all
state departments equally would be
impossible to achieve in Michigan.
Even if it were possible to cut police,
courts, prisons and social services back>
to a "bare bones" figure of 80 percent of
1980 funding levels, the state budget
See 'U', Page 7

R
f R nS rie e
/ ^'R1~, *,
A .~-
Doily Photo by MAUREEN OWMALLEY
THREE UNIVERSITY students practice a routine as part of a new program
set up by the School of Music that is designed to give students a chance at a
high level theatre career.
New eprogramtrains
students for theatre.

Study says drinking
a~e 0.tied to crashes1013I NIrf

By JOHN RUSSELL
Five University students are get-
ting a touch of Broadway this term
at the School of Music.
The studentsrecently were admit-
ted to a new musical theatre degree
program which, according to music
school Associate Dean Willis Patter-
son, will train them for careers in
the American musical theatre
community.
Patterson chaired a four-person.
committee composed of faculty
members from the University's
theatre and drama, voice, and dance
departments that spent two years
designing the new program's
curriculum. He said the program
idea originated during discussions
between faculty members and
students several years ago, and
finally became a reality after
receiving approval from the Regen-
ts this summer.
SUDENTS IN the new four-year
bachelor of fine arts program will
receive traditional instruction in

ballet, opera, and classical music,
but also enroll in specialized sec-
tions of musical school courses to
study music theory, music history,
voice, and dance as they relate to
musical theatre.
All of the students enrolled in the
new program said they hope to per-
form in Broadway productions some
day, but added that they realize they
will face tough competition.
"It's amazing what you don't
know, you don't realize how much
training you need," said Susan Shut-
tleworth, a student enrolled in the
new program.
Gail Negbaur, who is also enrolled
in the program, said that its well-
rounded curriculum will be an asset
to her training for a professional
Broadway career.
"YOU HAVE TO be strong in
everything, not just acting or dance
or voice," she explained. "Broad-
way shows used to have a chorus
line, with (separate) dancers and
See STUDENTS, Page 7

%./By BARRY WITT
A researcher from the University's Highway Safety
Research Institute today will present his findings that the
state's 21-year-old drinking age has had significant effects on
alcohol-related traffic accidents among 18-20 year-olds.
Alexander Wagenaar, a senior research associate at the
institute, has found that among 18-20 year-olds "the frequen-
cy of police-reported 'had been drinking' crash involvement
was 30.7 percent lower in 1979 (the first year after the age
minimum was raised from 18 to 21) than one would have ex-
pected had there been no change in the drinking age," accor-
ding to information published in a news release yesterday.
Wagenaar will publicize a summary of the report before the
American Public Health Association.
THIS REPORT COULD badly injure the already sagging
support for Michigan's Proposal B, a constitutional amen-
dment that would lower the drinking age in the state to 19.
A Gannett News Service poll of a cross-section of
Michigan registered voters showed that, as of October 3, 60
percent of those polled opposed lowering the drinking age,
whereas only 37 percent favored it, with three percent un-
sure.
Wagenaar will present only a summary of his report to the
conference at Cobo Hall this afternoon because the full report
cannot be released until the Michigan Office of Substance
Abuse Services, which contracted the study, authorizes its
publication.
RICHARD DOUGLASS, THE project director, and
Wagenaar, the principle investigator, are allowed to speak
about their findings today under a provision of their contract
with OSAS that says they may do so at professional meetings.
Both Wagenaar and Douglass confirmed reports that

OSAS has had the full study for ten days but has not moved to
release it. Douglass said the whole study has been available
to Kenneth Eaton, administrator for OSAS, but has "not been
well-received because it conflicts with the party line
(referring to Eaton's and other state officials' support of
Proposal B)."
But Eaton said Friday that he had only received a sum-
mary of the report and was unsure if the full study had been
delivered to his staff.
BASED ON THE summary that he said he has seen,
Eaton said non-fatal, alcohol-related crashes arhong 18-20
year-olds in 1979 were down significantly, but such accidents
involving fatalities did not decrease as much.
He said the "decrease among alcohol-related deaths was
less than that for non-alcohol related" fatalities.
State police records show this to be true, Wagenaar ad-
mitted, but explained there were "too few fatalities to ac-
curately assess the results" in terms of the higher drinking
age. He said that from year to year the number of alcohol-
related deaths fluctuates too much in both directions to be at-
tributed to the drinking age.r
Eaton still maintains his position that the drinking age
should be lowered, arguing that drinking and driving is only
one of many factors involved in the deaths over Proposal B.
He also has "some skepticism" about the methodology of the
institute study.
He said that Wagenaar may not have used adequate con-
trols for the fewer miles driven in total on the roads last year
due to energy supplies and the economic situation in the
country.
Wagenaar believes that his study did allow for such fac-
tors in its analysis and that his findings are conclusive.

Black
Englis h
re ort
finds
ambiguity
By PAM KRAMER
The performance of the plaintiffs
in the Black English case at Martin
Luther King Elementary School has
improved since the implementation
of a one-year teacher training
program, said a report recently
released to the Ann Arbor School
Board and U.S. District Court Judge
Charles Joiner.
But, according to one of the
report's contributors, the evidence
is not conclusive that the progress is
exclusively a result of the new
program.
"YOU CAN'T tell right away how
effective (the program) was," said
William Hall, a'University of Illinois
linguist. "It is an extremely com-
plex problem, and there are a lot of
other things going on at the same
time, so it is difficult to measure
progress."
The evaluation of the teacher
training program was released to
Joiner approximately two weeks ago
in compliance with his court order
requiring an in-service program on
Black English at the King School.
The plan included five workshops,
adding to a total of 20 hours, in which
the 18 teachers and 13 support staff
members were given, according to
the report, a course in
sociolinguistics applied to
education.
The recently-released report,
compiled by board members with
contributions from two professors
from out-state schools, states that
the six participants in the program
have made progress in reading, at-
tendance, and attitude.
The court order was a result of a
suit filed against the Ann Arbor
Board of Education in 1977 alleging
that the black students at King
School are not treated equally in
school because of a language
barrier. The plan focused on the im-
pact that Black English can have on
the process of learning to read by
students who speak this dialect.

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1
offman postponem.. h
ent marts iewpoint

By STEVE HOOK
A rescheduling of a local appearance by Abbie
*Hoffman -may cost the financially-beleagured
Viewpoint Lecture series thousands of dollars.
Hoffman, the prominent ex-Yippie who recently
surrendered to federal authorities after seven years
in exile, has indicated that he'll be unable to meet
his agreement to appear on November 6 at Hill
Audiltorium. No reason for the cancellation was
disclosed, Viewpoint officials said.
INSTEAD, HOFFMAN'S spokespersons have
agreed to an alternative date of November 12 for an
Ann Arbor lecture, according to Viewpoint Chair-
woman Michele Carter. The largest available site for
this date is the Michigan Theater, however, which
has a seating capacity of 1,835-less than half of Hill.
The arrangement is acceptable to Viewpoint and its
parent organization, the University Activities venter,

Carter said yesterday, even though potential
revenues would be restricted significantly.
"We can't possibly make money on the lecture at
the Michigan Theater-we could have at Hill," said
UAC President Neale Attenborough.
The newly-arranged Hoffman appearance will
almost certainly lose money for Viewpoint, which is
significant because its officials have been counting on
it to make up for losses from other events. Hoffman's
fee will be $4,000 to appear, and Carter estimated the
Michigan Theater rental fee at $250. If the lecture
sells out at the $2.50 (for advance tickets) and $2.75
ticket prices, income will still not exceed $5,000.
AT HILL AUDITORIUM, more than twice that
amount could have been brought in.
Despite the curtailed prospects for replenishing
Viewpoint's bank account, which has been battered
recently by expensive lectures that drew meager

crowds (e.g. Ralph Nader, Shana Alexander and
James Kilpatrick), Carter said the show will go on
without dramatically hiking tickets.
'I'd rather have the people there and lose money,"
Carter said. "It's important that we prove that
students will come out, even' if we do lose money,
which we will."
She added that she called Hoffman's agent, Steve
Pena, yesterday afternoon, and that he agreed to
bring Hoffman to the Michigan Theater. "I was told
that Hoffman really wants to come to this area," she
said.
She also said that some "smooth talking" was
necessary with UAC officials to approve the
rescheduling, but that "there's no way I'm going to
let this pass by."
Hoffman is scheduled to appear in court on
November 10 toface the drug charges against him,to
which he has already pleaded guilty.

Hoffman
... postpones visit

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1

TODAY
L fe in the Zuga lane
HAT HAS TWO LEGS, is occasionally masked
and lives in Mosher-Jordan? A Zuga, of course.
Zugas are a group of past and present Mo-Jo
residents who, for the past six years, have
been celebrating the annual rites of midterms by par-
ticipating in various, well.. .looney activities. This year, in
particular, is a special year for the Zugas. Not only is it Mo-
Jn's"50th annivrary hutthe7uashave nrnmised tnrima

mwmdm

kicked off with a Zuga "Sunrise run" across campus in
which runners will form-you guessed it-a big 'Z'. At noon
Friday, there will be a Zuga rally on the Diag, to be
followed with the "grand finale" Friday night-a Zuga
banquet in which prizes will be awarded to winners of such
categories as "the most confused person," "the best
dressed Zuga," and "the best Zuga roommates." Binek,
who said the Zugas are "hoping for an expansion in the
ranks this year," stressed that Friday's banquet has to be
limited to a scant 125 Zugas because Mo-Jo's cafeteria can-
not hold more people. Ql

faithful dog, Spot-fumbles his way through life, pursued
relentlessly by his nemesis, Sluggo. For Mr. Bill cannot be
blamed for the all too often problems which beset him.
Whose fault is it when he took his first step under the tires of
a truck? Or that his babysitter ironed his clothes-while he
was still wearing them? The Mr. Bill Show, written perhaps
by the gentleman who knows the little guy best-his
creator, Walter Williams-also contains full-color photos of
everyone's favorite star. Oh, noooooooooo! E
It's a matter of life and breath

while boosting the number of filter brands available. But
the best weapon in the anti-smoking arsenal appears to be
Brezhnev, who has tried repeatedly-and unsuc-
cessfully-during his 14 years in power to kick the habit.
Although no figures are available, smoking is apparently a
dominant factor in Soviet society, since it is difficult to find
an adult male who does not have a cigarett dangling from
his lips. Before signing the SALT II treaty with President
Carter last year, Brezhnev said, "I trust there will be no ob-
jection if anyone wants to smoke." Once the president gave
the nod, most of the Soviet delegation-including
Brezhnev-lit up. Word has not vet been received on

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