100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1980 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

~2Wc
APily
a uC a " I

WEs WONtTTPAI
ar~erburytoFt
ocdober 16,1 z, 9
TirM-Sed 8Srt.

ARTS

Page 6

Friday, October 17, 1980

The Michigan Daily

U

Jarreau'.s vocal
gymnastics thrill

the marionette theatre of
PETER ARNOTT
Z !f/<Fp% r S--P4 a S,

BACCHIE

ANTIGONE
69e, -- /7

By MARK COLEMAN
Al Jarreau is a problematic perfor-
mer: Easy to enjoy but hard to fit into
any critical perspective. Too slick to be
Jazz, too wide-ranging to be rhythm
and blues, Jarreau's pop pastiche is a
pliable springboard for his vocal leaps
and bounds. And herperformed this
unique brand of musical acrobatics for
an adoring audience at Hill auditorium
Wednesday night with nary a slip.
It would be unfair to describe Jarreau
as merely a singer; he incorporates a
range of at least three octaves with a
ferocious energy; vaulting from a
husky tenor to a sharp, piercing falsetto
in a single bound. Employing his voice
like a musical instrument, Jarreau took
the melodic impetus from the start of
the show, leading his six piece band
through mostly up-tempo material
loosely structured, yet stringent enough
to contain in his flights of fancy.
IT WOULD BE even more of an in-
justice to describe Jarreau's music as

jazz; strictly speaking his voice is the
only improvising instrument in the
band. His sidemen are content to keep a
simple-minded rhythmic fluidity goind,
pausing to fill the song gaps with jazzy
flourishes and occasional, innocuous
solos. Jarreau' s compositions are
somewhat faceless: They may be in-
distinguishable, but they gain nuance
and depth from the treatment they
receive.
Jarreau skips octaves with ease,
scatting a blue streak, inflecting
shreiks, gasps, clicks, whispers,
moans, groans, sighs, yelps and God
knows what other sounds into a flow
that always retains a very stylized am-
biance. He can take a fairly complex
melody like Chick Corea's "Spain" and
recite it vividly, practically note for
note or flush out a ballad like "We Got
By" with a lush simplicity, and then
build it into an extemperaneous
tightrope excursion.
See JARREAU'S, Page 7

OCTOBER 16 & 17,11980
8pm admission $2
R.C. Auditorium, 701 East University
C04 r1c
ApY7 -4

Performance guide
Today's Performance Guide covers October 17th through the 23rd and was
compiled by Mark Coleman (music), Anne Gadon (theatre) and Dennis
Harvev(films).
MUSIC5
Art in America-This four-piece art-rock ensemble from Hamtramck has
impressed a lot of people on previous visits with quirky, compelling rock and
a fascinating electric harp player. Sunday, Rick's, 611 Church. Music starts
after 9:00 p.m.
Luther Allsion-This young turk of the Chicago blues is starting to mature
and solidify his own sound-the originals are starting to sound as good as the
covers. Wednesday, Rick's, 611 Church. Music starts sometime after 9:00
p.m.
Stockhausen's-Fur Kommende Zeiten-"For Times to Come", 17 texts for
intuitive music performed by an ensemble of synthesizers, electric guitars,
oboes and English horns. Stockhausen's intuitive music is a form of directed
improvisation where musicians play from written and verbal instructions
rather than standard notation. The result should be surprisingly musical
and, yes, even accessible. Thursday, Pendleton Room, Michigan Union, 8:0Q
pm MOVIES
The End of August at the Hotel Ozone-Directed by Jan Schmidt, this
Czechoslovakian film has been little-seen as a result of its unique pessimism
,and lack of lip-service to the Soviets. An allegory set amidst a ravaged count
tryside after the world nuclear war, it follows eight female survivors who
remember nothing of pre-holocaustal civilization, and another who struggles
not to forget. Of unknown quality, but who knows when you'll get another
chance to see it? Friday, 7:00 and 9:00, Hutchins Hall (Law Quad).
The Black Stallion-A broad leap in spirit from the agreeable juvenile ad-
venture book it's based on, Carroll Ballard's film is a sort of mystical boy-
meets-god romance, Equus without the guilt. Extraordinarily fluid and
assured (if a bit cold) for a first directorial effect, it has the mark of a potgn-
tial master-magnificent visual flourishes, -a strikingly ominous undertow,
unique physicality, and a set of surprisingly subtle performances. You can
certainly take the kids, but- The Black Stallion dazzles most in how far it
manages to stay away from being a kiddie show, landing somewhat higher
through sheer intelligence rather than violence or overt sexuality. Saturday,
1:00, 3:15,7:00,9:15, Aud. A., Angell Hall.
The Philadelphia Story-James Stewart and Cary Grant vie for the affec-
tions of Katherine Hepburn in Philip Barry's immaculately constructed
romantic comedy. At once cooly stylized and frivolous, in the usual George
Cukor manner, it's completely satisfying-most society-farce films of the
era demanded a leap of the imagination, but Hepburn, Grant and Stewart
really are more witty, beautiful and charismatic than anyone else. Hepburn's
caricature of a snob near the beginning is possibly her finest moment as a
comedianne.
THEATRE
Extra Crunchy Theatre-If Reagan's conservatism is getting you down,
check out We Can't Pay, We Won't Pay, a seriocomic look at the problems of
consumers, by radical Italian playwright Diao Fo. At the Canterbury Loft,
332 S. State, Performances Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30
p.m.
Marionette Theatre of Peter Arnott-First came modern dress Shakespeare
and now Greek drama with puppets. After his success last year with
Euripides' Bacchae Arnott returns to A, with a production of Sophocles' An-
tigone featuring life-sized marionettes. At the R.C. Auditorium in East Quad
Friday at 8 p.m.
Guest Artist Series-Guest artists Philip LeStrange and'Kathleen Kleinistar
in Spring Awakening about the sexual curiosity of adolescents. After its
German premier in 1906 this play was banned for its "pornographic con-
tent." Performances Wednesday through Sunday at the Power Center, 8
p.M.

0

r
a

FREE DELIVERY 7 DA YS A WEEK!

iC An artist of broad
powers and deep com-
prehension. A keen in-
telligence and delicate
sensibility producing
one of the purest forms
of beauty. P?
- Herald Tribune, Paris
inthony di lonzventura,
An American Pianist Returns to Ann Arbor
ih[k, October 1 ZS3Q
Rackham THuditorium
Tickets $8.00, $6.50, $5.00
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12. Phone 665-3717.
6IIVERSITYfUSICAL OCIETY
In Its 102nd Year

WE DELI10E4
Mon-Thurs
5 pm-i am
Fri-Sat
5 pm-2 am
Sun
5 pm-11 pm
Breakfast
Served Anytime
Free Hash Browns
With Any Eggs or
Omelettes

<flfRD~
GACCHUS' GRDNS
338 S. State Street
For fast pick-up orders call: 663-4636

VE DELIVER:
Round Pizza!I
Sicilian Pizza!
Sandwiches!
Dinners!
Greek, Italian,
American
Dishes!
Beer,
Cocktails,
and
Extensive
Wine List.
r-

Bridgewo
con cert c
The second concert in Eclipse Jazz'
Bright Moments series has been can-
celled. The Bridgewater Brothers, a
modern bebop quintet have postponed
their entire Midwestern tour, including
their Ann Arbor appearance, which was
scheduled for this Friday, October 17 at
the University Club in the Michigan
Union.

rter Bros.
ancelled
The Bright Moments series, an at-
tempt to present lesser known jazz ar
tists in smaller, more conducive venue
will continue, however. The next
scheduled event is an appearance by
drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson. and
his group the Decoding Society, an elec-
tric "avant-funk" band, slated for
November 21st.

I

ยง 1 Y st r .'
y ; .. i
E , j 1/ ; I , a
; f , i
J J{ "F P + J f
a .
t 'fir f
i4 " t
4"- '. .
t ' ; itts t
Cf2' ti"" '.r
- ,.
- x
-
' o
i
0

Ps~e RAY
CHARLES
THE RAELETTS
ai the
RAY CHARLES ORCHEStRA
Special Guest:
Ernie Krvda Quartet
November12
Wed. 8:00 p.m.
Hill Auditoriun

ki

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan