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October 15, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THERE ARE PEOPLE
OUT THERE
h"
414
THEY LIVE IN PLACES LIKE CHAD, MALI, TOGO,'
BELIZE, BENIN . .. GABON, RWANDA AND FIJI. IN
AFRICA, ASIA, LATIN AMERICA. THEY LIVE IN
AMERICA, TOO. IN CROWDED CITIES, FORGOT-
TEN HILLS. THEIR DREAMS ARE COMMONJ
NEEDS BASIC: FOOD AND WATER, HEALTH AND
HOUSING, JOBS, ... AND YOU. . . TO HELP AS Aj
'PEACE CORPS OR VISTA VOLUNTEER.
Oct. 14,15,16
Career Planning and Placement
Interviews/Information
(313) 226-7928 VISTA

4

Page 10-Wednesday, October 15, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Reagan sa he would apoint

a womai
From AP and UPI
LOS ANGELES-Ronald Reagan, criticized
by women's rights activists over his failure to
back the Equal Rights Amendment, promised
yesterday that if he is elected president he will
name a woman to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Reagan said "false and misleading ac-
cusations" that he opposes equal rights for
women "have possibly concerned people."
THE FORMER California governor
speculated that one reason polls show a greater
degree of opposition to his candidacy among
women than men is what he described as
another "false accusation" that he would be
more likely than President Carter to lead the
nation into war.
Meanwhile, a campaign debate between Car-
ter and Reagan became a live possibility again

e to Supreme
when the League of Women Voters decided to include a
review John Anderson's status as a real conten- frontation
der. for a one-
"We are going to look at the polls this week," be acceptE
league president Ruth Hinerfeld told reporters. he said wh
"If Anderson is not significant, he obviously IN HIS
would not be invited to the next debate." nearly a
ANDERSON, the independent candidate establishn
whose standing in the polls has been declining, Bank as
said in Chicago his support still is strong enough 242," the
to make him a credible national candidate. to stateho
"I will be disappointed if they would reverse In othe
their positions and come to the conclusion that I the Reput
was not worthy to participate," he said. Ex- increasei
clusion, he added, would be very harmful to his programs
quest. else in the
Reagan, the Republican presidential nominee Carter
who has insisted that any debate package must governme

Court
provision for a Carter-Anderson con-
, would not say if a league invitation
on-one debate with the president would
able. "I'll meet that when it happens,"
hile campaigning in Los Angeles.
FIRST formal news conference in
month, Reagan also defended the
ment of Israeli settlements on the West
"entirely legal under U.N. Resolution
doctrine that recognizes Israel's right
od.
r developmnents, Carter charged that
blican hopeful's proposal to cut taxes,
defense spending, and protect social
would eliminate just about everything
federal government.
demanded Reagan spell out what
ent programs he would cut to achieve a
budget under his economic program.

6

balancedt

POLL SHOWS INFLUENCE MINIMAL:
Christian push ineffective?

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University
11

NEW YORK (AP)-The well-
publicized efforts by some conservative
Christian groups to mold the "born-
again" faithful into a voting bloc for
this fall's elections don't seem to be
working, an Associated Press-NBC
News poll says.
Born-again Protestants are now split-
ting their votes between Jimmy Carter
and Ronald Reagan in the presidential
contest, despite endorsements of
Reagan by some leaders of the conser-
vative Christian movement. In fact,
Reagan does more poorly among the
born-again vote than among others.
AND THE final pre-election push
planned by conservative Christian
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DRAMA
GUEST ARTIST SERIES
presents
spring
awakening
by Frank Wedekind
22.26
MstC/erga nd Viacaccepted($0mniwu80

By a 61-35 margin, born-again
groups probably won't find a receptive cent and Carter named by 41 per cent. Protestants said that churches and
audience either. Independent candidate John B. Ander- clergymen should not get involved in
Basically, born-again Protestants son was the choice of 6 per cent, others politics, like endorsing candidates.
and likely voters generally don't think were named by one per cent and 10 per That is similar to the 66-30 finding on
churches and clergymen should get in- cent were not sure, the same question for all likely voters.
volved in politics. And only about one + BOTH CARTER and Anderson have ASKED specifically their response if
born-again Protestant in 25 said he described themselves as born-again asked to back a candidate by a member
would be more likely to vote for a can- Christians. of the clergy, only 4 per cent said they
didate backed by a member of the That's not a particularly good would be more likely to for that can-
clergy. Nearly nine in 10 said such a showing for Reagan. Among non-born- didate. Seven per cent said they would
suggestion by a minister would make again Protestants he leads Carter by a be less likely to vote for him and 87 per
no difference. 51-27 edge, while holding a 43-35 margin cent- said the clergyman's recommen-
About one-third of the 1,548 likely among all likely voters. 'dation would make no difference.
voters interviewed classified them- The poll said that born-again Among all likely voters, the split was
selves as "born-again." Protestants are not receptive to similar, three per cent said they would
That group split on the presidential political involvement by religious be more likely; eight per cent less
race, with Reagan the choice of 42 per leaders. likely and 88 per cent no difference.
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TNI
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FRI
FOOTLC
live music,

Plans.m
submitted
to reduce
crowding
in prisons

LANSING (UPI)-Attorney General
Frank Kelley reluctantly compiled with
a court order yesterday by submitting
plans for reducing Michigan's swollen
prison population, but warned im-
plementing them would be neither safe
nor wholly effective.
Chief Assistant Attorney General
Stanley Steinborn said it is physically
impossible at this time to eliminate
prison crowding without jeopardizing
the public.
INGHAM COUNTY Circuit Judge
Ray Hotchkiss, who ordered the plans
last week after ruling prisons were too
crowded, met with state officials and
activist attorney Zolton Ferency for
about 45 minutes and said he will make

a final decision in a week to 10 days.
Both sides were asked to submit fur
ther materials.
Kelley's plan includes expanded use
of halfway houses, more parole, tem-
porarily holding prisoners in county
jails' after sentencing, altering
eligibility for furlough and allowing
drug dealers and some sex offenders to
be placed in halfway houses.
IN ALL; THE steps would reduce the
prison population by about 1,075-far
short of the 1,500 to 2,000 needed to
bring it down to a capacity level. s
Kelley said other state officials see as:
the ultimate answer to Michigan's
crowding problems Proposal E-a .1
percent income tax for new prison con-
struction.

668-84'

I

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DIYI
tU

Four Americans and one
Briton receive Nobels

9

STOCKHOLM, Sweden (UPI)-Four
Americans and an Englishman won the
1980 Nobel Prized for chemistry and
physics yesterday for research that
may lead to .an understanding of cancer
and the birth of the universe. It was the
second Nobel prize for the Briton.
The double winner was Medical
Research Council molecular ' biology
Professor Frederik Sanger, who won
the same award in 1958 for work on the
structure of proteins, especially on in-
sulin. Only three other people have won
. two Nobel prizes in the 79-year history
of the awards.
SANGER, 62, SHARED this year's
chemistry prize with Americans Paul
Berg ,and Walter Gilbert for their
studies of deoxyribonucleic acid, com-
monly known as DNA, the essential

component of all living matter that con-
tains the genetic code.
The Swedish Academy of Science sais
their research might one day may help
man "understand the nature of can-
cer."
The physics award was' won by
Americans James Cronin and Val Fitch
for research which removed questions
that had clouded the "big bang" theory
of the origin of the universe, the
academy said.
Both prizes are worth 880,000 Swedish
kronor, about $215,000. The academy
said the chemistry prize would be
divided so that Gilbert and Sanger
would split half and Berg would recieve
the other half. Fitch and Cronin, who
worked together, will divide the physics
prize.

After 15 interviews with various com-
panies, I finally found MITRE. And after 15
interviews I definitely knew what I was look-
ing for when I saw it.
I had to have breathing room. A place
that would turn me loose and let me work on
different kinds of projects. On the other
hand, I had to know I'd be able to turn to
other people for advice and backup. And I
definitely wanted a steady growth situation.
With the MITRE people, I knew right
away I'd found it all.
At any given time, they have some 75
or so funded, significant programs involving
several hundred separate projects and
tasks. And because they're Technical Ad-
visors to the Air Force's Electronic Systems
Division in Command, Control and Com-
munications (C3), they design and develop
some of the world's most advanced informa-
tion systems.
Still, MITRE handles every assignment
as if it were the only one. Because they have
to rnmP toi with the right snh ution everv time.

Openings exist in:
COMPUTER SYSTEMS
COMMAND AND CONTROL
SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE
COMMUNICATIONS
RADAR SYSTEMS
See your Placement Office to set up an
on-campus interview, or send your resume
directly to Jerome P. McKinnon, The MITRE
Corporation, Bedford, MA 01730. U.S. Citizen-
ship or resident alien registration required.
MITRE will be at
University of Michigan
on October 29, 1980

SucessulCareers
Don't Just Happen
At the Institute for Paralegal Training we have prepared
over 4,000 college graduates for careers in law, business and
finance. After just three months of intensive training, we will
place you in a stimulating and challenging position that offers
professional growth and expanding career opportunities. As
a Legal Assistant you will do work traditionally performed by
attorneys and other professionals in law firms, corporations,
banks, government agencies and insurance companies.
Furthermore, you will earn graduate credit towards a Master
of Arts in Legal Studies through Antioch School of Law for all
course work completed at The Institute.
We are regarded as the nation's finest and most prestig-
ious Grogram for training legal specialists for law firms,
business and finance. But, as important as our academic
quality is our placement result: The Institute's placement
service will find you ajob in the city ofyour choice. If not, you will
be eligible for a substantial tuition refund.
If you are a senior in high academic standing and looking
for the most practical way to begin your career, contact your
Placement Office for an interview with our representative.
We will visit your campus on: Wednesday, October 22

141

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