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October 11, 1980 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Intellectuals' and
perpetuate UM-MS

By STEVE HOOK
Ah, college rivalries.
The students may come and go like migrating
geese, but the rivalries endure. Across the country,
students of neighboring schools seem to try their har-
dest not to get along with each other. As long as they
are competing in academic or athletic ventures, one-
upsmanship reigns supreme.
FEW COLLEGE RIVALRIES are more firmly en-
enched than the Michigan vs. Michigan State con-
est. Ever since the northern neighbor shed its cow
college ways and became a formidable Big Ten
power, the student bodies of Ann Arbor and East
Lansing have been at odds.
Today, with the Spartans invading Michigan
Stadium to take on the Wolverines, the rivalry is as
strong as ever.

Said one MSU student: "It's a fu
just hate Michigan on this campus. Pe
The hatred, however, seems to go f
athletic competition. It is not the foo
ball duels that concern students from
much as it is the differing acade
lifestyles-which all agree are sharpl
AT ISSUE IS the relatively coml
academic environment here in Ann i
to the more relaxed atmosphere pre
State students interviewed Thursday
in East Lansing invariably cited "
Michigan as forcing too much stud
studying.
"Competition-that's the key wo
student Bob Towner. "Michigan stud
enough-they worry about school too

'Partiers'
U stereotypes
inny thing-you Another MSU student concurred. "Here, you don't
eriod." have to say, 'Oh, God, so-and-so is going to get a bet-
ar beyond mere ter grade than me.' At Michigan, it's like a rat
tball or basket- race-it seems you're always competing."
both schools so TO MANY MSU students, the competition at
mic and social Michigan leads to the "snobby" character of many
y contrasting. Ann Arbor students.
petitive, intense "It's not that we think we're better than you," one
Arbor compared MSU student said. "It's that you think you're better
vailing at MSU. than us."
night at a party "There is this image of Michigan students,"
competition" at another added. "You know, the little hats and the thin
lent devotion to ties, the calculators strapped to their belts."
MSV senior Dan Harrey put it more graphically:
rd," said MSU "Intellectual assholes is ,the typical quote you hear
lents don't relax
much." See STUDENTS, Page 3

n-
b'
K { '7k M A tFt

Ninety-One Years
of m
Editorial Freedom

P

LIEo

1 Ia1

CLOUDY
Cloudy and cooler today
with a chance of showers.
Highs in the mid 50s.

Vol. XCI, No. 33

Copyright 1980, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Saturday, October 11, 1980

Ten Cents

Ten Pages

Algerian

quakes

kill

thousands

Is

Large city virtually destroyed

From AP and UPI
ALGIERS, Algeria-Two severe earthquakes yesterday
killed "thousands" of people and destroyed 80 percent of the
city of Al Asnam, an official government communique
reported.
The quake struck the city of Al Asnam, 150 miles west of
Algiers, at 12:30 p.m. (8:30 a.m. EDT) and was followed by a
second tremor two hours later lasting more than a minute. Al
Asnam has 125,000 inhabitants.
THE OFFICIAL ALGERIAN news agency APS described
the quake as "a catastrophe," but did not give a precise num-
ber of how many people were killed or injured.
The government mobilized army, air force, police and
civil defense units for an emergency relief operation to help
the injured and homeless and search for bodies in ruined
buildings.
Civil and military workers evacuated many injured
people, APS said.
The government reported whole apartment buildings had
collapsed. Old and prefabricated buildings on the outskirts of
the city also shuddered and fell, causing more casualties, the
officials said.
"LARGE FISSURES, SOME deep, run across the coun-
tryside and in some places the road has collapsed," APS
said. "Whole families are gathered at the roadside, having
fled their ruined homes."
Officials closed roads leading into the city for safety
reaons and security services turned back "the curious," APS
reported.

FRANCE
PORTUGAL
SPAIN.
Earthquake
Devastate. M.dit.,ran.on S.#
City
Al Asnm
Oran
TUNISIA
MOROCCO ALGERIA
Communications with the market and manufacturing
town were cut.
Algerian President Bendjedid Chadli proclaimed seven
days of national mourning. Algiers television and radio
broadcast appeals for people to donate blood and to remain
calm, with Moslem religious programs in between.
Medical teams were rushed into the area by helicopter
and other doctors and nurses across the country mobilized.
All military personnel in Algeria were ordered to report to
their units.

Daily Photo by DAVID HARRIS
A SECOND CHANCE bouncer checks identification at the popular nightspot. Liquor sales have reportedly declined
at area establishments since the increase in the legal drinking age.
Proposal B supporters
anticipate close fight

...... ::....... :...................... s:":::. " .:5.......... v. ::. {i;}}:"}:.:.. . .:. . . :.... ,,.:.::Y... . ... :...
Dor m bre akfasts fop

By BARRY WITT
As election day nears and the
ballot proposal to lower the legal
drinking age to 19 comes closer to a
vote, supporters of the proposal
acknowledge a close fight is ahead,
while opponents believe the
proposition has little chance of suc-
cess.
Evelyn Vinolus a spokeswoman
for Nineteen is Fair, the Michigan
group running the campaign for
passage of Proposal B, said she
believes the race is "neck and
neck. Too many people believe.
(Proposal B) is going to pass easily,
but it'snot." ,
THE HEAD OF the Michigan
Council on Alcohol Problems, the
principal opponent to Nineteen is
Fair, said the climate now is not
good for passage. Reverend Allen
Rice said that because many voters
will be voting "no" on the tax
proposals on the ballot, they will
follow suit on the drinking age
question.
Opponents of Proposal B are
repeating many of the arguments

used in 1978 when the drinking age
was raised from 19 to 21. They main-
tain that the 21 legal age keeps
alcohol out of the high schools and
decreases the alcohol-related ac-
cident rate.
"If you want more kids having ac-

cidents, vote for B," Rice said
recently. "But if you want more
lives saved, vote 'no."'
REPRESENTATIVES of
Nineteen is Fair and a host of state
officials disagree markedly with
See DRINKING, Page 2

City dealers report
drop in liquor sales

By JEFF VOIGT
In the two years since the state
drinking age was raised to 21, local
bars, restaurants, and stores have
had to adjust to changes in their
sales and clientele, according to Ann
Arbor merchants.
While some 18-to-20-year-olds still
frequent 'local watering holes and
liquor stores, these establishments
have beefed up efforts to screen out
sales and service to those under 21.
Statewide., the number of licensed

liquor distributors cited by the
Liquor Control Commission for
"selling, serving, or allowing minors
to consume liquor" has doubled sin-
ce the drinking age was raised from
19 to 21 in December 1978, increasing
from 378 in 1978 to 634 in 1979.
From January to August, 1980 a
total of 800 citations were issued
statewide. Updated figures for Ann
Arbor were unavailable.
Dooley's manager Jim Mills
estimated that the Maynard Street
See AREA, Page 2

By JOYCE FRIEDEN
It's been about as popular as Cap'n
Crunch in milk for an hour.
The Housing Office's new dorm
breakfast program has attracted only
about 15 early risers every morning
since its inception September 29.
THOSE 15 HAVE purchased $10 meal
tickets for either Stockwell or Bursley
dormitories that can be used to buy
cereal, juice, rolls, coffee, and other
continental breakfast items.
The low turnout, however, apparently
has not discouraged housing officials,
who instituted the breakfast program in
response to the results of a dorm
resident survey conducted last year.
"Of course I'd like to see mbre people
there," Associate Director of Housing
Norm Sunstad said yesterday. "But I
don't have a feeling of failure at all. It's
a nice service and there is noadditional
cost imposition on the students"
because only those students who use the

Housing
St akprogram '
service pay for it, Sunstad said.
ALTHOUGH THE Stockwell
program is intended to serve all Hill
area dorm residents, most of the diners
there have been Stockwell residents.
The breakfast service is offered from
7:30 to 8:30 a.m., and yesterday two
women came appropriately dressed
for the early hour-in pajamas and
bathrobes.
Stockwell resident Sarah Walsh said
she believes the early hours of the
program' have discouraged students

from taking advantage of it. "This is
the first time I've been here, and none
of my friends ever eat here," she said.
"There probably aren't many people up
at this hour."
Walsh added that the selection of
menu items was fairly good.
One student from another dorm, An-
drew 'Whallon of Mosher Jordan, said he
had eaten breakfast at Stockwell before,
although only infrequently. "I don't
think many people know about it," he
said.
Sunstad said he did nqt think the
program would be extended to 9 a.m.
every morning to attract more students
because of the increased costs that
would be involved. The cafeterias are
normally open until 8:30 a.m. to ac- /
commodate students making sack lun-
ches, Sunstad said, but after that time
additional employees would have to be
hired.

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rDAY-
Night Owl bus route change
HE MICHIGAN UNION will be added as a stop
on the Night Owl bus service route effective
Monday, Oct. 13, according to University
Transportation Services Administrative
Associate Norma Hurst. The Night Owl bus
currently departs from the Undergraduate Library and
heads south on Tappan St. en route to Hill St., she said. With

Wednesday. The students were members of an earth scien-
ce class that took a field trip to a Beaufort Bay marsh to
gather marine samples. They got stuck up to their necks in
mud when they decided not to wait for the tide to rise and
began walking over the mud to, the water. Beaufort
policemen used life preservers and ropes to pull the
unharmed, but upset students back to solid ground. "I'm
distressed ... but the students really were in no danger,"
said Principal Riddick Trowell, adding that field trips are
still on for the marine biology program. Several other
students got stuck also, though not as deeply, he said. All of

we wouldn't have to resort to films. It was great," Hannah
said Thursday. The reason for the unusual schooling is that
Hannah thinks breastfeeding may prevent a disease which
killed one newborn gorilla this summer-and landed another
in the hospital. Because the zoo has always taken newborn
apes away from their mothers, according to Hannah, they
don't know how to breastfeed their young. But the apes are
intelligent and will learn quickly, he said. Deborah
Williams, 30, of suburban Worhington, was one of the
women who offered her services, "I'm very interested in
the zoo," she explained. Her husband doesn't particularily

and started down the steps," Collette explained. Instead of
landing on the step, his foot hit the edge and his body weight
shifted back on it, breaking his foot. "I'm being laughed at
by every court employee and all my friends. If it wasn't
right in the middle of the campaign it would be funny," said
Collette, who has a cast on his foot and is on crutches. Now,
he says he'll just have to convince voters "that I have been
walking up and down stairs very successfully for almost 35
years." e.

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