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September 04, 1980 - Image 81

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-04

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 4, 1980-Page 7-8

MWAMI.-

Libraries act as

-04%

f

social, study hubs

By BETH PERSI(
It's the day before the cbmistry final
and you're sweating ullets-and
rightly so. You've floundced around all
semester, partying to .he hilt. You
haven't cracked a booksince the mid-
term and now it's clearhat to pass the
exam you've got to gettown to some in-
tense cramming.
But in -the dorm crazies make
irritating noises 24 hbrs a day. Where
can you go to escapet all? The Univer-
sity has dozens of liraries, which can
be used during suclmergencies.
The Harlan Btcher Graduate
Library (the "Gra" for short), when
not frequented bypanicking students

campus libraries. The Grad also con-
tains an Asia Library and a Library
Science Library.
WHEN STUDENTS can't find a seat
in the Grad, have to do re-
serve reading, of just want a looser
atmosphere, they may opt for the Un-
dergraduate Library (UGLI). Since the
Grad closes at midnight every night ex-
cept Saturday, when it closes at six,
many students migrate to the UGLI at
the strike of twelve, since it is open most
nights until two a.m. On Saturday
nights, the UGLI's doors are locked
at 10.
The ' "UGLI," its' nickname
describing the bare cement walls and

Fall and winter term hours

GraduateI
Undergrad

Libury: Monday thru Thursday, 8 a.m. to
Friday; 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.;
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.;
Sunday, I p.m. to midnight.
uas Library: Monday thru Friday, 8 a.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. to midnight;
Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2 a.m.

midnight;
to 2 a.m.;

reparing for ,pals, offers a comfor-
table, relaxingand quiet atmosphere.
THE DEC& in the Grad varies
greatly, raging from the high-
ceilinged refrence room on the second
floor to Micelangelo-like murals on
several wall. The third floor offers a
reserve reeding room with comfor-
table, moden chairs and decor, as well
as 'a snak bar. On the more
Pjirhitive--nd typical-side, graffiti-
covered stdy carrels can be found on
P the seconothrough sixth floors of the
south builthg.
The. oldr, more impressive side of
the Gradntroduced by massive stairs
beginninat the south edge of the Diag,
contrast; with the newer sections,
which inludes the study carrels and a
rare boos room on the seventh floor.
aThe rre books room is "a way of
showin off some of our special
treasurs," said librarian Karla Van-.
dersypn. The exhibits, which are'
replacd every two months, deal with
topics uch as feminism, intellectual
freedoi, and the fall of Rome.
The card catalogue room on the
secon floor contains a listing of every
book:ontained in the Grad's stacks as
well is book listings for many other

strewn litter, is seen by many students
as a social center. However, the four
floors, each including study space, are
often packed by fretting crammers in
anticipation of exams.
Reserve readings are required for
many classes, and they often present a
frustrating problem. Many students
who wait until the last minute are often
unable to obtain' the needed books,
which can usually be checked out for
only a few hours.
THE AVAILABILITY of reserve
readings "really depends on how many
books the professor puts out, how many
people have to do the reading, and how
long they wait to do the reading," said
Aileen Murray, a student assistant at
the library.
The UGLI and the Grad both have
elaborate electronic detectors at their
exits, which make it virtually im-
possible to leave the buildings with
library materials that have not been
checked out. Librarians report nabbing
"a couple of people a day" trying to
escape with unchecked library
materials.
If a book is returned to most campus
libraries by the third day it's overdue,
no fine will be assessed. But the fourth
dxy brings a fine of $1 per book, with an

additional 25 cents fine for each day
thereafter.
ONE LIBRARIAN said a grace
period of a month is usually allowed
before a hold credit is placed on a
student; which makes virtually any of-
ficial University transaction im-
possible. UGLI records list an average
of 3,000 hold credits at any given time,
with almost 2,000 books being turned in
late each term.
Professors, unlike students, are not
charged overdue fines until the book is
eight weeks late, at which time they are
assessed $1.25 per book.
There are many libraries besides the
UGLI and the Grad which are available
to undergraduate students. The
majestic Law Library is located in the
Ivy League-style law quad. Long tables
and walls adorned with intricately car-
ved wookwork create an atmosphere
unlike that of any other campus library.
SEVERAL MEDICAL libraries
provide modern comfort, among them
the Dentisty Library, the Medical Cen-
ter Library, and the Public Health
Library. Many students prefer to find
an empty classroom in the Public
Health Building across from the
Markley residence hall during finals,
while others prefer the comforts of the
reading room of the Modern Languages
Building.
Many libraries serve a dual pur-
pose-as research tools and as displays
of special works or collectons. The
Clements Library, decorated in a plush,
antiquated style, offers rare books
dealing with America's history from
the late 15th Century through the Civil
War. The special library attracts
mainly graduate students from all over
the country.
The Museums Library contains
exhibits on different living creatures,
the Fine Arts Library a special collec-
tion on Asian Art, and the Music
Library a collection of American
Popular Music.
Other campus libraries include Ar-
chitecture Library, the Bureau of
Government Library, the Chemistry-
Pharmacy Library, the North
Engineering Library, a Mathematics
Library, Michigan Historical Collec-
tions, a Natural Science-Natural
Resources Library, a Physics-
Astronomy Library, and a Social Work
Library.
Run out of places to study? Try your
dorm library.

UNIVERSITY CELLAR S
MEDICAL, DENTAL &
L AW T E XTS....
E EXAMINATION STUDY
GUIDE...
AND A COMPLETE
SELECTION OF THE
MOST UP-TO-DATE
PROFESSIONAL
REFERENCES ..
501o OFF LIST PRICE
ON NEW BOOKS
25-35O1o OFF LIST
PRICE ONJSED
LOCATED ON THE GROUND FLOOR
=OF THE MICHIGAN UNION BLDG.
OPEN MONDAY- THURSDAY 9-9
FRIDAY 9-5:30
SATURDAY 0-5 S U NOAY 12-5

t
r.
460

9i

. .

AATA management
union renew nego

By ELAINE RIDEOUT as days
After a week of inaction, AATA joint un
management officials renewed and uni:
negotiations with representatives of the tackling
Transportation Employees Union "We're
(TEU) yesterday, but both sides agreed issues tl
only' that the talks did little to resolve he said
the week-long strike. resolve,
AATA employees walked off the job back int
by a vote of 150-3 at midnight last Mon- BUT
dayafter AATA management did not stiategy
recommend extension of the contract at the s<
that expired June 30, and the union guarant
refused to ratify the management's contrac
final proposal. Shell
AATA UPPED its six per cent wage TEU,
increase offer to 9.2 percent prior to the mat ,l
contract expiration date. In its final of-
fer last week, the union brought dow'
its wage request to 33 per cent frr
per cent originally requested.:I
The two parties met both
and together with a state of
four hours yesterday but
AATA director Richard
new proposals were sut h
side.
According to
management has
of discussing non e c Y r.: a

off with pay, the structure of
nion-management committee,
forms for bus operators bef,
the issue of wage incre'
trying to focus on fiftee
hat tie in directly wit
. "The more of tl
the more fundi"
;o wages."
THE union
;y as "dodgi-
ame time
teed e
t.
ey .

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