100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1980 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

''

The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 10, 1980-Page 9

CREA TURES SIGHTED IN KENTUCKY, OHIO, PEKING

Monsters shock

witnesses

MAYSVILLE, Ky. (UPI)-Anna Mae
Saunders, still awed by the sight of
0 "Bigfoot," said yesterday she doesn't
want another look at the 7-foot creature
covered with long, white hair she is cer-
tain she saw last weekend outside the
home of her son-in-law in rural Mason
County.
"I just hope that thing doesn't come
back," said Saunders, 60.
"I NEVER SAW anything like it in
my life. It just looked like a big white,
fuzzy thing standing there on the porch.
I never saw it's face; it was above the 7-
foot-high door," she added.
Saunders' son-in-law, Charles Fulton,
said the creature had one of his roosters

when he opened the door, but either
dropped or threw it as it jumped off the
porch.
He described the so-called "Bigfoot"
as having long, white hair with
"glowing animal-like eyes." Fulton, 39,
went outside and saw it standing bet-
ween the house and an outbuilding. He
fired two shots with a .22-caliber pistol
at the creature, but they seemed to
have no effect, he said.
SAUNDERS SAID there had been
similar sightings recently in Aberdeen,
Ohio, just across the Ohio River from
Mason County.
Robert Gardiner, 40, a big game hun-
ter for 20 years, is convinced he has

found the lair of Bigfoot in the hills of
southern Ohio near McArthur. He
urged hunters to hold their fire if they
see him.
Gardiner said an analyst, who
examined blood samples taken from a
tree in Wayne National Forest in Vinton
County, described the samples as "ape-
like humanoid blood."
HOWEVER, Gardiner said he will
have the blood analyzed again to get a
second opinion.
Meanwhile in Peking, more sightings
were reported yesterday of China's
Loch Ness-like monster living in a
flooded crater of a dormant volcano in
what was called a new "scientific rid-

dle."
Two personnel of a weather station on
a peak above Lake Tien Zhi were
walking along the edge of the four-
square-mile lake Aug. 23 when the
"monster" suddenly rose out of the
water about 30 yards from them, the
Guangming Ribao newspaper said
yesterday.
THE WEATHER officials said the
creature towered almost 15 feet above
the surface. It had a large buffalo-like
head with a duck beak-shaped snout.
The dark head of the creature
streaked across the mirror-like surface
of the lake rapidly like a speedboat,
leaving a wake at least 300 feet long,
one weather official said.
Both weatherman, petrified at the
sight of the mysterious creature, star-
ting yelling and shouting in ex-
citement. They fired two shots in panic,
but missed the creature which quickly
submerged into the frigid waters of the
crater.
In another sighting, Peking writer
Lui Jia, 65, said he and six friends were
watching the sunrise on the morning of
Aug. 21 when the creature appeared.
"I could see it very clearly," Lui said.

Spftzberg blasts Tisch proposal

Sund~ay MP'onday Tuesday'Wednesday' Thursay fR-4tlSouday
r sPECI ALS F.1 .=4
pp. R )---.- w tfr
EP 1 191 16.'r
6.4NPAV -/+DSP4..,T' NINb'r
t~T4M hi MwS ABbd9
-- ~~ )F ~* UrS NEAVL/NE £
nish
^ 4120 e 2e + u 23 V 2
1B O G '

(Continued from Page 1)
day the ballot proposal classifies tuition
as a fee, and thus it could not be in-
creased without voter approval.)
DURING THE press conference,
Spitzberg said higher tuition rates and
competitive entrance requirements
would push students towards out-of-
state schools.
"These students may never return to
Michigan," he said, "which will be a
tremendous loss in human resources
for the state."
If professors are laid off, "the
remaining faculty will be so concerned
with solidifying their own positions,
they may neglect their teaching fun-
ctions," he said.
The fact that the Tisch proposal
received enough support to earn a place
on the ballot, Spitzberg explained, may
already have discouraged high quality
faculty from accepting positions at the
University.
"WHO WANTS TO take a job
knowing they may be gone in a few
years?" he asked.
Spitzberg also said that the Univer-
Experts say
LA smog to
* lift; illness
continues
From AP and UPI
LOS ANGELES-Medical authorities
reported an increase yesterday in the
number of people troubled by
respiratory ailments as smog and fog
choked the Los Angeles basin for the
11th consecutive day in the area's worst
October siege of air pollution in 10
years.
But forecasters said there could be
"significant improvement" in the next
few days because of changing weather
patterns that are expected to blow the
smog away.
FORECASTS FOR today called for
eight first-stage health alerts in the
four-county area, compared to 24 such
alerts yesterday, according to the South
Coast Air Quality Management
District.
An Air Quality Management District
spokesman said the layer of brown haze
that has kept contaminants bottled up
in the basin to the discomfort of some 10
million people was lifting.
The high pressure system in the basin
is breaking up, permitting the smog to
dissipate and Saturday should be the
best day in about two weeks for
breathing and normal physical ac-
tivities, Jeff Shenkel, AQMD
spokesman, predicted.

sity is in a period of "retrenchment"
and that it is important the faculty
utilize the available mechanisms to
have tinput in decisions concerning
program cutbacks.
He added that enrollment figures
should not be the only criteria used in
determining what programs to ,cut,
even though legislators usually place
these criteria above others.

"If programs are cut, and professors
leave the state, that will hurt
Michigan's industry," Irving ex-
plained. "The University's research
function to local industry is vital, and
has to be an important part of judging
the quality of programs.
"A university can be destroyed very
quickly," he continued, "And what's
destroyed will take decades to rebuild."

U:

I

BLUE NOTE.... and all that JAZZbw

NOW OPEN its E. WASHINTO -
Featuring-
Fish N' Chips $2.95
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT-NO COVER
Wednesday-Saturday
Cocktails, English Ale 663-9757

MANN THEATRES
UtL AGE 4
375 N. MAPLE
769-1300

DAILY DISCOUNT MATINEES
All seats $2.00 'til 5:30
Mon-Sat, 'til 2:00 on Sundays

Give the gift
of music.

SHOWTIMES 1:15 3:15 5:15 7:30 9:45

I

JACKIE McLEAN
Consequence
Blue Note
CLASSIC
GRANT GREEN
Nigeria
CLASC

ANDREW HILL
Dance With Death
Blue Nte
CLASSIC

THE BLUENOTE .ISSE SERIES
JOE PASS
THE COMPLETE
"CATCH ME!"
SESSCON

CinemaI

I

THE
JAZZ CRUSADERS
I IVF SIDFS

In 1912, at the Latonia race track
in Kentucky, a horse named Wishing
Ring won a race at a mutuel return of
$1,885.50 for each $2 bet.
raw
T bx

presents
The Barefoot Contessa
(Joseph Monkiewicz, 1954)
Humphrey Bogart stars as an embittered Hollywood director
reviewing the brief life and career of Ava Gardner, the Bare-
foot Contessa. It's a classic "happy rags to empty riches" tale.
"Contessa is a trash masterpiece; a Cinderella story in which
the prince turns out to be impotent."-Pauline Kael. (128 min).
7:00 ONLY
Sunset Boulevard
(Billy Wilder, 1950)
Wilder luxtaposed verbal wit with a sinister, morally disturb-
ing environment in this film about a silent screen star recluse
(Gloria Swanson) who icks-up and keeps a promising screen-
writer (William Holden). With Cecil B. DeMille, Hedda Ho pper,
Buster Keaton, and Eric von Stroheim in a pivotal role as
Swanson's "butler." (108 min.) 9:15 ONLY
Fri. Oct. 10 Aud A $2.00 one show, $3.00 both shows
Thunderball
(Terence Young, 1965)
Agent 007 battles the evil shadow of SPECTRE in his mission
to recover two nuclear bombs being held for a ransom of 100
million dollars. With his usual savior-faire and finesse, he
saves the world from, destruction and manages to rescue
several beautiful women as well. Starring Sean Connery as
the original James Bond. (Tom Jones sings the title song!)
(129 min.) 7:00 and 9:15.
Sat. Oct. 11A Aud A $2.00
Ashes and Diamonds
(Andrzej Walda, 1958)
On the final day of World War II, a Polish resistance fighter
stalks his intended assassination victim-the new Moscow-
trainerI istrict SAcretarv. An intense and complex work, this

'OU TO NCH!'

f[' t .liM '.*gp.'* e Omc1biol4lfly Cy

/

1t

+ I

OR
AR
N
AI

"Our Man in Poris"
Dexter Gordon

'"lue Train
John Coltrane

HERBIE HANCOCK
Maiden Voyage-

Blue Note

Blue Note

everyday price 5.49 each

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan