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October 09, 1980 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-09

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ARTS.

The Michigan Daily

Thursday, October 9, 1980

Page 9

PHILIP GLASS SCHEDULED

Minimalist composer to appear

The Michigan Daily- -Page 9
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I EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30, 1980
-----------------.-

By DENNIS HARVEY
Avant-garde composer Philip Glass
nd his ensemble will be bringing their
nique fusion of classical, Eastern and
minimalist musical influences to
Rackham Auditorium November .7 at
8:00 p.m. This Eclipse Jazz presen-
tation will afford Ann Arbor listeners a
chance to experience what has become
increasingly recognized as the core of a
new "classicism"-music based
around a rhythmic rather than a tonal
structure, compositions that have been
hailed as "reducing music to its basic
elements, so that the introduction of a
Snew chord, a chance in the color or tex-
ture of the sound or. a change in
dynamics is startling and revealing."
Glass has found a wider audience
than any of his comtemporaries in the
minimal/ambient/etc. genre, influen-
cing the works of rock artists such as
David Bowie, and fueling the ex-
perimental compositions of Robert
Fripp and Brian Eno. Dissatisfied with
writing music based around "the ac-
* cepted synthesis of influences" in stan-
dard modern orchestral works, he ex-
plored different forms in North Africa,
India and Tibet in the mid- and late
1960's, at one point studying with the
legendary sitar player Ravi Shankar.

Einstein on the Beach, a four-and-a-
half-hour opera structured around
dreamily repetitive aural and visual
landscapes, was created with Robert
Wilson in 1976 and staged to sold-out
audiences at New York's Metropolitan
Opera House. Last month his second
opera, entitled Satyagraha and depic-
ting incidents from the early life of
Mahatma Gandhi, opened in Rotter-
dam amidst the expected controversy
and intense critical discussion. A third
opera, drawing parallels between the
Akhenaton and Dedalus myths, is ten-
tatively scheduled-to debut in 1983.
Glass has also been delving recently
in the possibilities of merging his tran-
ce-like style with the energy of rock,
and co-produced the current album of
RCA's group Polyrock.
The Philip Glass Ensemble consists of
flutes, electronic organs, bass syn-
thesizer, saxophones, and soprano
voice. Tickets for the Rackham concert
are on sale at the Michigan Union box-
office, at $7.50 each; in addition to this
performance, Glass will lecture and
answer questions at the U. of M. School
of Music November 7 at 1 p.m., and the
following day at the same time and
location.-

DOWN
VESTS

Eclipse Jazz will present composer Philip Glass and his ensemble in concert
at Rackham Auditorium Friday, November 7, at 8:00 p.m. Glass' work, in-
cluding the epic'avant-garde opera Einstein on the Beach, have been hugely
influential in popularizing the musical forms variously known as "ambient"
and "minimalist," built around repetitive, dreamlike chords broken by
gradual shifts in tonal direction. Tickets are currently on sale at the
Michigan Union box-office at $7.50; lectures by Glass are also scheduled at
the School of Music.

I .

1

U.S. OFFICIA L SAYS SUPPLIES SENT:
North Korea aids ]ran

The
ARCTIC
Vest

WASHINGTON (AP)-North Korea
is providing ammunition and medical
supplies to help Iran in its1war with
Iraq, Treasury Secretary G. William.
Miller said yesterday.
He told reporters at a luncheon that
Iran has made several flights of large
747 cargo planes to North Korea to pick
up the supplies, but, did not know how
much assistance would be provided in
the long run.
j ..ther U.S. officials familiar with the
situation indicatea puzzlement aNrth
' orea's move to aid tftIrstiians in the
continuing war.
ONE OFFICIAL, who asked not to be
identified, said North Korea needs the

money it can make froip supplying the
Iranians: but also wants the friendship
of Iraq and other Arab countries. North
Korea intends to play a leading role
among nonaligned nations, a group in
which Iraq is prominent.
North Korea gets most of its arms
from the Soviet Union and China,
although it also manufactures some
ammunition of its owp, U.S. officials
said. Iraq's major supplier is the Soviet
Union.
The United States has not provided
spare parts to the Iranians since the
seizure of American hostages at the
U.S. Embassy in Tehran nearly a year
ago. Parts for U.S.-built military

equipment are extremely difficult to
buy elsewhere on the world arms
market, Miller said.
THE UNITED States has offered to
provide surveillance information to
friendly countries in the Persian Gulf
region to lessen the threat of air attacks
resulting fron the war between Iraq
and Iran.
Meanwhile, the Carter ad-
ministration is going through with
plans to supply Jordan with 100 tanks
With sophisticated targeting equip-
ment, despite an apparent setback in
U.S. efforts to encourage that country
to maintain its neutrality in the Iraq-
Iran war.

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SMilliken announces budget cuts
(Continued from Page 1)

MILLIKEN outlined cuts already
made, and said new reductions or
revenue increases totaling more than
$200 million are needed.
He announced new reductions which,
stretched over a year, will cut aid to
BOSTON (AP)-Massachusetts
residents burned almost a million cords
of wood to heat their homes during the
winter 'of 1978-79, equal to what all of
New England burned in 1976.
The increase, evidently a response to
rising fuel prices, may stretch the
state's forests to their cuttable limits in
just three years, perhaps force wood
prices higher than oil and raise new
questios concerning air pollution and
fire danger.
Those are conclusions of the first
statewide survey of home wood use in
the state. The report covered only the
winter of 1978-79 and was released
recently by the Berkshire-Franklin
Resource Conservation and Develop-
ment group.

colleges by $26 million, $18 million in
welfare, and $18 million in the troubled
Mental Health Department f9rcing the
closing of the Michigan Institute for
Mental Healfh at Dimondale.
Cuts detailed totaled $80 million and
other miscellaneous reductions bring
the total to $116 million.
EVEN WITH the cuts, which include
a five per cent reduction in general

assistance payments, the state Depar-
tment of Social Services and the prison
and state police agencies will run out of
funds in December-before the 90 day
period expires-unless a new budget is
adopted, Milliken said.
He also stressed anew the need for
new revenue sources, including lifting
an income tax exemption for military
personnel.

,

1;'i

Li

1980
OCTOBER 19-25
Applications for the Homecoming Court are now
available at the U.A.C. office, 2105 Michigan Union,
---- 763-1107

_

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