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October 08, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-,Wednesday, October 8, 1980-The Michigan Daily
The Polls

Lilja in line to land many honors

AP Top Twenty

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Alabama (60).........4-0
So. California (1).......4-0
Texas...............4-0
Pittsburgh (1).........4-0
UCLA (1).............4-0
Georgta..........4-0
Notre Dame..........3-0
North Carolina........4-0
Ohio State ............3-1
Nebraska............3-1
Florida State ............ 4-1
Oklahoma............ 2-1
Miami, Fla..........4-0
Penn State .............. 3-1
Arkansas ............... 3-1
Stanford...........4-1
South Carolina .......... 4-1
Baylor .................. 4-0
Missouri ................ 3-1
So. Methodist ........... 4-0

1,252
1,127
1,088,
1,087
991
896
882
731
705.
635
609
563
519
424
353
351
323
252
205
66

UPI Top Twenty
1. Alabama (39)...........4-0
2. So. California ........... 4-0
3. Pittsburgh (2) .......... 4-0
4. Texas ................. 4-0
5. UCLA (1) ............... 4-0
6. Georgia ................ 4-0.
7. Notre Dame ............ 3-0
8. North Carolina ......... 4-0
9. Nebraska...........3-1
10. Florida State.........4-1
11. Ohio State........... 3-1
12. Oklahoma............2-1
14. Miami, Fla.........'. 4-0
14. Penn State .............4-
15. Baylor. .............. 4-0
16. Stanford ............4-1
17. South Carolina ..........4-1
18. Arkansas ............... 3-1
19. Missouri................43-1
20. Iowa State ..............4-0

622
533
490
468
453
390
389
250
246
235
226
205
114
101
70
67
58
51
45
10

When George Lilja was in high
school, the one position he didn't want
to play was center. But when the coach
suggested he switch front tight end tb
the snapper's spot, he grudgingly ac-
cepted the change. Since'then, Lilja has
had few regrets.

By GARY LEVY The 6-4, 250-lb. fifth-year senior from

Palos Park, Ill. is the anchor of
Michigan's offensive line and his per-
formance last season earned him pre-
season All-American honors before the
1980 season began.
"Center was the last place I wanted
to go," said Lilja, the Wolverines' of-

-

fensive captain. "But things have
worked out, I can't complain.''
LILJA EXPLAINED that his lack of
speedfor a tight end and his lineman-
like size were the reasons for the move
by his coach at Carl Sandberg High
School, Cliff Eade. And he said he
thinks the decision enhanced his-chan-
ces of playing college football.
"I was lucky because a lot of scouts
looked at me at center who wouldn't
have if I had stayed a tight end," said
Lilja.
Lilja's choice for a school was
narrowed down to Purdue and
Michigan because he wanted to play in
the Midwest and particularly at a Big
Ten school because his brother had
played at Northwestern. And Michigan
had the edge because of a little sign that
hangs above coach Bo Schembechler's
office door.
"WHEN I VISITED Michigan, I saw
the sign above his door. It says, 'Those
who stay will be champions.' I wanted
to be a champion, so I came here," said
Lilja.
Lilja said he is well aware of the fact
that center is not one of the glamor
positions in football, and realizes that
with hard work, the accolades come in
due time.
"It's a long drawn out process. It's
not an immediate process, like for run-
ning backs. If you play good week in
and week out, the rewards will come
your way from the coaches and
players," said Lilja, who was named of-

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fensive champion of the game twice
last season.
LILJA ALSO EARNED the Meyer
Morton Award for 1980, given to the
football player who shows greatest
development and promise as a result of
the annual spring practice.
, However, Lilja said he has room to
improve before he'll ever be satisfied
with his performance.
"When I can master it all; when I can
block on any play, that's when I'll know
I'm doing my job," said Lilja.
"I haven't mastered it yet, but I'm
closer."
Playboy must think he's close as
Lilja was selected to the magazine's
pre-season All-American squad.
"I WAS SURPRISED because I knew
I had a good year last year, but I didn't
know if I was All-American material,"
said Lilja. "But I can't let it get to my
head."
Lilja's role as co-captain, along with
linebacker Andy Cannavino, has
become significant this season as far as
team moral is concerned with Michigan
suffering consecutive non-conference
losses to Notre Dame and South
Carolina.
"I TRY TO TELL the team that the
championship is still there no matter
what," said Lilja. "We've got no time to
sit around and think about the losses.
They are behind us now, and we've got
to look ahead. If we just keep pounding,
pounding, and pounding, the breaks will
come our way."
His explanations for the Wolverines'
offensive troubles this season are fum-
bles, interceptions, and missed
blocking assignments.
"You can block 100 percent, but it
won't do a bit of good if you don't get the
ball over the goal line," said Lilja.
"IT'S NOT THAT the line is bad. One
little breakdown on the line and the play
won't work. You need consistency, and
that's what we had last week. The of-
fense looked like the old Michigan,"
continued Lilja, in reference to the 497
total yards the Wolverine offense rolled
up.
If Lilja is sure of anything, it's that
the offensive line will improve. 0
"This is our second season together.
Things start to become habit," said
Lilja. "As soon as the mistakes are
ironed out, you'll see a more dominant
line. A couple of blocks here and there
could have made a difference.
"There's always room for im-
provement. If you're ever satisfied,
that's when you'll start to lose. 'If we
played as good as we should, we'd be 4-
0."

D~aily Photo
MICHIGAN CO-CAPTAIN George Lilja prepares to snap the ball to quarter-
back John Wangler in last Saturday's 38-13 rout of California. The senior
from Palos Park, Ill. was a pre-season Playboy magazine All-American.

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Reggae
rocks to
red'riscover.
its roots
(Continued from Page 7)
simpler, more direct approach:
Everywhere you go it's the
talk of the day
Everywhere you go you hear
people say
That the Special Patrol
they're murderers,
murderers
We can't let them go no
furtherer, furtherer
They kill Blair Peach
the teacher
They kill Blair Peach the
dirty bleeders
The wider vision of Johnson's earlier
work has been replaced by social
realism and musical economy. "Inglan
is a Bitch" describes the plight of
working class Blacks through their own
words and experiences over an infec-
tious dance rhythm sparked by John
Kipapye's jazz-inflected guitar licks.
Dennis Bovell's precision at the mixing
boards is present here throughout, and
throughout the album, retaining com-
plexity and utilizing thosedynamic dub
sound effects in a well-integrated, ac-
cessible fashion.
Johnson kills two birds with one stone
on "Di Black Petty Booshwah" lam-
pooning the obvious ("them climb up
the ladder on the backs of the blacks")
and, through a spaced-out horn riff and
bouncy rhythm, directing a barb at
Ska-revival-reactionaries. Johnson@
doesn't appropriate Jamaican music
out of a gimmicky trendiness, but
because he shares its political and
rhythmic convictions. Bass Culture in
its double-edged meaning asserts the
ascending importance of reggae and
other elements of third world culture
both artistically and socially. The
truths contained in the lyrics of Linton
Kwesi Johnson and Big Youth extend

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INTERVIEW DATE:

T HEMNFRIDAY, OCTOBER 17,1980
HTIEDM-

Ilb

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