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October 07, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-07

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 7, 1980-Page 5
Carter attacks GOP's tax cut;
Reagan doubts inflation figures

From United Press International
The nation's economy was the
political battleground yesterday.
President Carter called his op-
ponent's tax-cut plan, which also calls
for a balanced budget, "quicksilver
economics," and Ronald Reagan ac-
cused the president of "jimmying" in-
flation figures.
CARTER WAS on a day-long trip to
Wisconsin and Illinois-two states he
narrowly lost four years ago and again
trails in the polls. Reagan spoke in
Camden, N.J., the first stop on a week-
long cross-country effort ending Satur-
day in Los Angeles.
Reagan's proposal to cut taxes, in-
crease defense spending, balance the
budget and end inflation
simultaneously, Carter said, "glitters,
promises quick results and easy an-
swers, but ends up being worthless ex-
cept for the very rich who would benefit
greatly at the expense of working class
families."
For his part, Reagan said Carter
manipulated last week's producer price
index to make the economic outlook
look brighter for political purposes.
HE SAID THE government had ad-
ded auto rebates and discounts to its
calculations for the first time, and the
result was a 0.2 per cent decrease in-
stead of what would have been a 0.4 per
cent rise.

"I'm not surprised at the
recent-forgive me for this-jimmying
of official government statistics,'
Reagan said.
He called the one-time change a
"cruel hoax," and said it represented a
"new low in... biased campaigning."
Independent candidate John Ander-
son, meanwhile, was in Chicago-vir-
tually ignoring Reagan while stepping
up a blistering series of attacks on Car-

ter. He likened the president's cam-
paign tactics to the "dirty tricks"
pulled by Richard Nixon's campaign in
1972.
He ticked off a list of tactics he said
the Carter campaign has used against
him, including actions to keep him off
state ballots, the refusal to debate, and
a legal memo that banks might have
legal problems if they lent money to the
Anderson campaign.

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AP Photo
A RESIDENTIAL AREA of Abadan, Iran lies in ruins after two weeks of Iraqi air strikes hit the city. Most attacks
were aimed at Abadan's refinery.
fraq tksey port city
whilv e jets at
1i t SRac e ran

FromAP and UPI"
KHURRAMSHAHR, Iran-Iraqi
troops yesterday seized control of the
Iranian port city of Khurramshahr-a
major strategic prize in the 15-day-old
Persian Gulf war-except fQr the city
center, which they surrounded.
#" Iraqi jets bombed Tehran. An Iranian
;ormunique said three people were
'fied and 65 injured in the "cowardly
attack.., on populated areas."
WESTERN journalists in Khurram-
shahr saw Iraqi soldiers looting the
city's port sections. Only a few blocks in
the central area remained in Iranian
hands.
Iran insisted its forces were holding
out, but no sounds of fighting could be
heard in the center of the city, home to
about 150,000 people. The post area was
captured by Iraqi invaders Sunday.
Baghdad said the attack on Tehran
0was "in retaliation for enemy air
strikes against civilian targets in dif-
ferent parts of Iraq."
TEHRAN RADIO reported that in
addition to bombs, the Iraqi planes
released paper handkerchiefs, pens,
toys and dolls over theIranian capital,
and warned they might be booby traps.
Meanwhile, Jordan ordered
mobilization of all its transport vehicles
to carry food and supplies to the Iraqi
army yesterday, becoming the first
Arab nation actively and openly to sup-
port Iraq in its war against Iran.
Sources in Beirut, Lebanon, said
stockpiled Soviet military hardware,
spare parts and ammunition were
TE HR AN
Qasr-e-Shirin
IRAN
BAGHDAD
IRAQ Kb Tram hah
Abadan
* 4 Persia
KUWAIT GH
0 200
Miles

being sent to Iraq from the pro-Marxist
nations of South Yemen and Ethiopia
via Aqaba, the Red Sea port at Jordan's
southern tip.
IRAN, ALTHOUGH Moslem like
most Arab nations, is not Arab. It is
ethnically Persian but has a dissident
Arab population in oil-rich Khuzistan
Province, which borders Iraq and is the
site of heavy fighting.
Meanwhile yesterday, the speaker of
Iran's parliament said that the assem-
bly may impose additional demands
besides those outlined by Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini for the release of
the 52 American hostages.
Khomeini has said the captives, held
now for 338 days, would be freed if the
United States released frozen Iranian
assets, returned the late shah's wealth,
promised not to interfere in Iranian af-
fairs and apologized for past action in
Iran.
IN ADDITION, a number of Iranian
officials have called for spy trials for
the hostages.
Hashemi Rafsanja, speaker of the
Majlis, Iran's parliament, in an inter-
view tih Tehran radio said, "The
imam's (Khomeini's) words and views
are totally acceptable to our coun-
trymen.
"If he were to have views about the
hostages, the Majlis would im-
mediately,. and without debate, accept
his views," Rafsanjani said. "as for his
conditions concerning the hostages, the
four well-known conditions, he did not
mean to say there are only four con-
ditions."
The American hostages have now
surpassed by three days the time that
Subscribe
Now
to the 1 3atIV.

82 crewmen of the U.S. reconnaissance
ship Pueblo spent as hostages of North
Korea in 1968. The Pueblo's crew was
seized off North Korea on Jan. 23, 1968,
and freed on Dec. 22 the same year.

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