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October 07, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-07

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Page 2-Tuesday, October 7, 1980-The Michigan Daily
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Students
teach and
learn from
day care
experience

(Continued from Page 1)
Divided into groups according to age,
the 2- to 5-year-olds are taught by a
team of teachers and student aides.
Team teaching is a method which
allows new student teachers to gain ex-
perience under the guidance of an ex-
perienced teacher.
"This isn't a sit back and watch cen-
ter. You roll up your sleeves and go to
work," teacher David Murphey ex-
plained.
STUDENT TEACHER Li Hamilton
agreed, "You really have to watch each
other." Students also attend weekly
two-hour workshops for further teac-
hing instruction.

The teaching methods aren't the only
thing that makes Pound House different
from other day care facilities. The old
house still looks like a family home
even after five years as a day care cen-
ter, and Murphey said he thinks the
children benefit from this atmosphere.
"It's a house, it's been lived in and
slept in. It's hard to feel at home in
something made from cinderblock."
MURPHEY ALSO pointed out that
since the children play and learn in
small groups, they receive individual
attention and develop close relation-
ships with teachers and other children.

"It takes on the characteristics of a
family, which can be both good and
bad, but it has been shown that children
do best in a small group," Murphey
said.
A student teacher at the children's
center must possess patience, vitality,
and the ability to cope with stress, as
well as a strong desire to work with
children, Murphey said. They also must
be willing to learn.
"It's been one of the best learning ex-
periences of my life," said Brad West, a
veteran volunteer who has also worked
at the center through the Outreach
program.

IN BRIEF

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Beginning October 13, 1980
The LSA Internship Program
Will Be Accepting Applications
for Summer and Fall Internships, 1981
October 13-ApplicatIons available in 460 Lorch Hall
November 3-Final deadline for applying
APPLICATIONS and INFORMATION available in 460 LORCH HALL

Frye warns shortage in
funding may cause layoffs

(Continued from Page 1)
the faculty," Frye said, adding that he
did not enjoy being the bearer of un-
pleasant news. Acting LSA Dean John
Knott will give his reaction to the an-
nouncement of possible faculty layoffs
on Wednesday, Frye said.
According to Frye, the University "is
not in any worse condition than any of
its peers." Enrollments are declining at
universities across the state, he said,
and a 15 to 20 per cent decline in
enrollments has been predicted during
the next 15 to 20 years.
"Per capita increases in tuition are
no way to combat revenue shortfalls,"
Frye said. Program reductions are
necessary because at this point "there
are no other internal sources we can
turn to as alternatives to state
revenues."
FRYE ALSO SAID reductions in
equipment funds and other non-

academic areas were not a sound
solution to the budget problem. "To
allow these areas to deteriorate would
put the University into an even worse
position," he said.
The planning for program reduction
thus far has been small and vague, ac-
cording to Frye. "In the last few years,
what has happened was not budget
reduction, but budget reallocation," he
said. "We failed in the past to set a
specific target for reduction."
Frye said the University must set
specific amounts that are to be cut from
each department's budget and that in-
centives must be given to make the
cuts.
FRYE IDENTIFIED the other major
problem facing the University aside
from revenue shortfalls as faculty
demography.

STUDENT DINNER SPECIALS MON-THURS
Aft10 o n DdY...
251 East Liberty * Ann Arbor, Michigan
Phone: (313) 665-7513
Monday 75t off Veggie Sandwich
Tuesday $1.00 off any Quiche Dinner
. Wednesday 75C off any Giant Stuffed Potato
Thursday 754 off any of our Crepe Dinners I
Coupon valid between 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. I
EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30, 1980 1
-- --.-. --....-......... -......- . --- -- I

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
}4
New N-plant off to bad start
SODDY-DAISY, Tenn.-The Sequoyah Nuclear Plant, years behind
schedule and $1 billion over budget, operated fewer than seven hours in its
first three days because of mechanical problems that included a leak of
radioactive water.
Tennessee Valley Authority spokesman Steve Goldman said yesterday
the plant would be closed until at least Thursday or Friday while maintenan-
ce crews removed "several gallons" of water that spilled into the reactor
containment area Sunday.
Goldman said the problems are part of "working the bugs out," and
were expected.
The TVA facility is located about 20 miles north of Chattanooga on the
Chickamauga Lake impoundment of the Tennessee River. Construction
began in the late 1960s and the plant was scheduled for completion in 1973 at
a cost of about $400 million. TVA officials say the cost now stands at $1.5
billion and the second of two reactor units at the plant is still not completed.
Doctor announces new strategy
for treatment of liver cancer
BALTIMORE-A John Hopkins radiologist yesterday reported the
development of a unique way to deliver high doses of radiation directly to
inoperable tumors and extend the lives of some patients with advanced liver
cancer.
The technique hitches radioactive iodine to antibodies, an arm of the
body's defenses, which zero directly in on cancer cells and thus spare the
rest of the body dangerous doses of radiation.
Dr. Stanley Order said the still-experimental treatment has produced
dramatic results in some cases, adding many months to the lives of Datients
who normally live only three to seven months after they are first treated
Of 11 liver cases treated so far, Order said the average patient lived 11 mon-
ths. Five are still alive, one 15 months after treatment.
Little action following actors'
strike; most support musicians
HOLLYWOOD-Hal Linden and his colleagues on "Barney Miller"
reported to their studio yesterday, but otherwise the return to work from the
longest actors' strike in history got off to a weak start, with many actors
staying home.
Although many of the actors were absent because production had not
begun on their programs, the rest failed to show up to honor striking
musicians' picket lines. The American Federation of Musicians picketed vir-
tually every major studio to publicize their demands.
Other than the "Barney Miller" rehearsal, there were few reports of ac-
tors turning out at such major studios as MGM, 20th Century-Fox,
Paramount, Universal, and Disney.
"I've seen a few people, but they're crew people," said 20th Century-Fox
security officer Marvin Kellogg. "No one is really showing up yet."
Coast Guard arrives at ailing
cruise ship; assesses damage
VALIEZ, Alaska-Coast Guard firefighters landed by helicopter yes-
terday aboard the cruise ship Prinsendam and began trying to determine
whether they could salvage the vessel as it drifted abandoned and still
smouldering in the Gulf of Alaska.
Its 533 passengers and crew-all reported safe on land-awaited flights
to Seattle late yesterday. But authorities said fog here in Valiez, where many
are staying, might force people to ride buses north to other cities where they
could catch flights to Anchorage.
Coast Guard spokesman Phillip Franklin said the crew "feels the fire
may be burning itself out, but it could be all day and night before they know
whether they can handle it." He added that the ship will not be moved until
the fire is out.
Ferency continues to
fight Tisch
LANSING-Zolton Ferency, down but apparently not out in his battle
against the Tisch tax cut amendment, said yesterday he may seek a
rehearing of last week's 6-1 Michigan Supreme Court defeat.
The former Democratic Party state chairman believes the
proposal-which is scheduled to appear as Proposal D on the November
ballot, should warn voters of the radical impact its passage would have on
the state.
"The basic claim of the lawsuit has been that the Tisch proposal would
radically change our form of government by destroying representative
government as far as taxing power is concerned," Ferency said. He con-
ceded that chances for a rehearing are slim, as officials are running out of
time in which to print the necessary posters.

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-t Michigan Batgl
Volume XCI, No.29
Tuesday, October 7, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Snydicate and Field Newspaper Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY; Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising:
764-0557; Display advertising: 764-0554: Billing: 764-0550: Composing room: 764.0556.

Editor-in-Chief....................MARK PARRENT
Managing Editor .................. MITCH CANTOR
City Editor...................... PATRICIA HAGEN
University Editor...................TOMAS MIRGA
Features Editor................. BETH ROSENBERG
Opinion Page Editors ................ JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
Sunday Page Editor..............ADRIENNE LYONS
Arts Editor ......................MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
Soorts dior......... ... .. ALAN FAr . Fit

Business Manager .........ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Sales Manager................KRISTINA PETERSON
Ooerotions Manaaer.............KATHLEEN CULVER
Co-Display Manager... . ....DONNA DREBIN
Co-Display Manager,.........,. ROBERT THOMPSON
Classified Manager .............. SUSAN KLING
Finance Manager ......... GREGG HADDAD
Nationals Manager . ... .... LISA JORDAN
Circulation Manager ......... TERRY DEAN REDDING

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