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September 04, 1980 - Image 76

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-04

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Page 2-B-Thursday, September 4,1980-The Michigan Daily

To study or not to study

By NICKKATSARELAS
If there's one thing that has always
bothered me about college students, it
is their ultimate conviction to studying
vigorously and remaining extremely
dedicated to their work.
Yet, I've always maintained that
education should never get in the way of
college. I mean, why study when you
could be having fun?
. "THE WAY I figure," said one
prawny lad quaffing Molson's at
pooley's, "I'm only in college once,
right? But when I'm old, you know, like
35, I can still read War and Peace, and
know whatI'm saying?"
Some will criticize this choice of what
to make of your college experiences.
But let's look at it realistically. When
you go post-graduate job hunting, it's
not what, grades you got, but rather,
who you know. Uncle Arthur doesn't
care whether youwere' Phi Betta Kap-
pa; -,he wants to make sure you can sell
coats.
SYou'll be confronted with two

studying methods: Sweat Method and
the Mellow Method. The Sweat Method
means caffeine addiction, frustration,
no sleep, and extreme obesity or weight
loss (depending on how your frustration
manifests itself). The Mellow Method
means lots of dates, parties, movies,
and free time. The Institute for Social
Research (ISR) has just completed
compiling data on two students who
each employed one of the methods in
studying for an exam. Here are the
results:
"Sweat Method: Two pounds -of
M&Ms, 15 cups of Maxwell House In-
stant coffee, 7 Cokes, 9 No-Doz, 2 hours
of sleep, 64 outbreaks of spewing.
vulgarities, 17 'hours of intensive
studying, 137 pages of notes. Result: B-
minus.
"Mellow Method:' .9 hours of sleep,
two square meals, 3 two-hour phone
calls, three hours of Monday Night
football, four hours at Dooley's, 3 out-
breaks of vulgarity spewing, 2 hours of
intensive cramming: Result: C-plus.

Is it really worth it?
Now, there is always one worry which
is endemic to the Mellow Method: how Yr
to inform your parents that their son or
daughter didn't achieve a 3.8 GPA. The55111
method you'll employ is called the
"Turn-the-fender-bender-into-a-head-
on-collision-and-then-Dad-won't-be-so ,
mad-when-he-finds-out-it-was-really-
only-a-fender-bender-after-all ."
Here is an excerpt from a conver-
sation between a student who achieved
a 2.8 his first semester, and his parents:
"Mom, I'm sorry."
"Honey, what's wrong?"
"Mom, I just got my grades. (Sniff).
"God, Mom, I'm really sorry...
"Oh, No! You flunked out, didn't
you?"
"Oh, Mom, I really wanted to make
you and Dad proud of me ..."
"You flunked out, didn't you?'Your
father and I have been working all our
lives so you can go to school and be a
doctor. Your father could do it. Whyfw
can't you? (Sigh). Alright, what did you5,
get?"
"I got a 2.8. About a B-minus { 4
average."
"Oh, God!!! Terrific!!! Beautiful! Diy Photo by JIM KRUZ
And I thought you were fooling around "THE MELLOW METHOD" of studying requires students to party hard, get plenty of sleep, and study as little as possible.
in college!
AN AL TERNA TIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCE
RC is a school within a school

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By JULIE SELBST
In a University where making the
grade and getting admitted to
professional school have become all-
important, the Residential College has
developed a reputation for being the
last vestige of unconventional throught.
Housed in East Quad, the "R.C.," as
it is known on campus, is also con-
sidered a bastion of social con-
sciousness and karma-raising. Said one
student, "My roommate wasn't -in the
R.C. when I met him. The day he
joined, he turned vegetarian."'
FACED WITH STIFFER competition
than they ever knew in high school, and
with large lecture halls where
professors may not know their names
by the end of the term, some students
entering the University come very
close to transferring after their first
term. It was for this problem that the
R.C. and the Pilot Program were
designed to combat.
The Pilot Program, which is housed
in Alice Lloyd dormitory, was a trial
run to see if the "college within a*
college" idea could work. It was suc-

cessful from 1962 to 1967, so in 1967, the
Residential College was founded.
Together the programs account for the
enrollment of some 1200 students.
"The Residential College is a degree-
awarding, self-contained school within
the literary college (LSA)," explained
Razelle Brooks, assistant to the direc-
tor of the R.C. "It was started by a
committee of the parent college to
respond to two needs. First, it was
trying to overcome the excesses of site
at the University, and second, the
faculty desired a place where they
could experiment with curriculum."
ACCORDINGLY, THERE are certain
requirements in the R.C. which differ
from those of the regular literary col-
lege. Besides the two-year live-in
requirement, students must fulfill LSA
distribution requirements, as well as
complete an intensive language
requirement, followed by a reading
course in that language. A freshman
seminar is also required, and a fine arts
practicum in which students must ex-
perience directly some area of the fine
arts, and at least 12 R.C. courses during
theirfour years.

Students can earn degrees in majors
from the literary college or from the
Residential College, which has six ex-
tra concentration plans.
The Pilot Program, while it ' was
meant to test the conventional system
in LSA, has been continued because
some students like the idea of the
program, but don't want to plunge
completely into it.
The program requires a theme ex-
perience' class-a one credit course
composed of panels, films, and lectures
centered around a major theme-and
English Composition 125, which is
required for all LSA students. Students
must also be active in the program's
extradisciplinary opportunities. It is
only a two year program.
Outside the academic realm, the
Pilot Program offers counseling,
minority programs and special interest
corridors where students in the same
field of study or with the same interests
live on the same hall.
According to program director David,
Shoem, the program "supplements
what students are learning in LSA. He

also said that some graduate students4
who teach courses live in the dor-
.mitory. "In " R.C.," he noted, "the
faculty don't live there. Here there is
the opportunity for students.to have in-
formal sessions with their instructors."
East Quad is also reknowned for the
"Killer" game. Killer was started by
Lenny Pitt in East Quad four years ago.
It is a game in which all the players
have a victim whom they must kill and
an assassin who must kill them-with A
plastic dart gun! Although there are
many rules regarding killings, the ob-
ject of the game is to kill as many
people as possible without getting killed
first. One of the Killer coordinators,
Bob Cantor (who is god to some during
the Killer season) said Killer is just a
more subtle way of getting out your
aggressions than baseball and football.
"It's like playing tag with darts," said
Cantor gleefully. Nevertheless, the
psychosis is rampant during the seaon
and quaddies drop like flies. The game
starts with about 215 players, but after
24 hours, more than half the players are
off to that big EAST Quad cloud in the
sky.

MICHIGAN
STUDENT'
ASSEMBLY
MSA:
REPRESENTS STUDENT INTERESTS
" MSA is the one student government made up of students from every school and
college (graduate & undergraduate).
" MSA represents all U of M students in the formulation of University policy, seek-
ing to improve the educational experience and quality of student life by lobbying the
University governing board and administration.
" MSA works with issues 'ranging from tuition levels and course quality to the de-
velopment of the Michigan Union as a student center.
MSA also appoints student representatives to University committees which
participate in the University decision-making process.
PROVIDES SERVICES TO STUDENTS
* MSA funds Student Legal Services, a free legal aid service for students in need
of legal adivice or representation.
" MSA also funds the Housing Law Reform Project and the Tenants Union which work
to improve student living conditions and tenants' legal remedies.
* MSA offers a complete, but economical student health insurance plan and a
theft/fire insurance plane for students (including renters).
SUPPORTS STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS & ACTIVITIES
" MSA provides services to student organizations including office and activities
space, referral services, and information distribution. MSA regulates and acts as
an advocate for student groups on campus.
" MSA provides funding to help student groups sponsor events and undertake
major projects.
" MSA ,sponsors (often with other groups) entertainment, arts, current events
lectures, and cultural events.
EDUCATES AND DEVELOPS STUDENT PARTICIPANTS
" MSA is a unique and valuable educational experience for the students who
participate in MSA activities and committees. MSA provides an opportunity to work
directly with people and solve real problems-an opportunity seldom available in.
a classroom setting. In fact, many MSA "alumni" now working in the business and
professional world (as well as in government) feel that their involvement in student
government was the most valuable part of their education.
MSA IS FUN
* MSA is not just a valuable experience, but is also a great place to make friends and
have fun.
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MSA OR ARE IN
TERESTED IN PARTICIPATING IN MSA, DETACH THE BOTTOM OF THIS
AD AND MAIL IT TO: Michigan Student Assembly
3909 Michigan Union
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
MSA WILL CONTACT YOU WITH THE INFORMATION REQUESTED
Name
A - A - _ ....- -- [in t nl l I

COUR SE REGIS TRA TION

CRISP

0

A necessary task

a

By JULIE BROWN "The system became active in the mation on students having hold credits,'
Registering each and every Univer- spring of 1975," said Tom Kerunaw, factors barring them from registering.
sity student for classes term after term assistant registrar. "The first full-scale Academic hold credits are assigned to
may sound like an awesome task, but it use was in the fall of 1975. It was a com- students on academic probation or who
has tod ge don. The Uvsbits plete switchover, because we did not have financial debts to the University.
has to get done. The University's useanybackupsystem." Kerunas said it is important when
Registration Involving Student Par- THE SYSTEM CURRENTLY uses 22 released y theo chier before going to
ticipation-was implemented in 1975 in terminals for registering students, plus CRISP
order to make the job a little easier. two additional terminals with infor- According to Kerunas, the system's
early-days were not without problems.-
1 hFo In September of 1975, many University
Awis Expriene For Eveiy Jew! students faced four hour registratiori
ul5 tijtat iwaits and lines creeping around they
block, he said.
"Starting in January 1976, we begarr
CM 2to fine-tune the system," said Kerunas;
a University graduate with a master's
A_ degree in biostatistics. Partiaf
revisions of the system, done throughJ
t L'"the University's Data Systems Center;
&? 0Iad A3os Se stule have since smoothed out the process, he
S713Hill St. (Cor. of Oakland) Ann Arbor said.
NEARLY ALL University students
CHABAD HOUSE FEATURES: use CRISP, with a few exceptions;
KOSHER KORNER RESTAURANT Students enrolled in the School of Soeiat
" FRIED CHJCKEN, HAMBURGERS, FELAFEL AND MORE Work, the Law School, the Medical
* A FULL LINE OF DELI QgityShg
" A ULLLINEOF ELISchool and the Dentistry School
" MEAL CONTRACTS. SPECIAL DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE
CLASSESregister for classes independent of
CLASSES
" READING Hebrew CRISP.
" translation and meaning of prayer "vrbd lei upsdt ~
"e",2"", "Y*"Everybody else is supposed to come
" Chumosh (Hebrew Bible) arnd
" Shulchan Aruch (Jewish law here," Kerunas said. He added that arl
+ Talmud chitecture students, undergraduate and
" A Chassidic approach to Mysticism
SIntroduction to Judasim graduate, are allowed to begin
- (everything they didn't wont to teach you in Sunday School registration at the Art and Architecture
" anything else not mentioned here 5I.ZLaI-r1LL!.q
,SABBATONIM, (week-end retreats, services, etc.) School on North Campus. Their course
" every Friday evening and Saturday morning selections are then sent to CRISP for
" full service followed by festive Shabbat meal AT NO CHARGE processing. "If they want to drop/add,
WITH Hassidic songs, stories and gems of wisdom
DAILY MINYON (Services) they must come back at the scheduled
. with free cake and coffee time," he added.
OTHER FACILITIES Second-term freshpersons, coming
" COMPLETE English language-Judaic library (cassette and music through CRISP for the first time after
library being established) summer orientation, may face
" game room with pool table, ping-pong table, etc.oretinfc
+ gift shop with jewelryJewish records books, and much more. problems in deciphering the workings
PHONE 99-LEARN r of CRISP, Kerunas said.
See COURSE, Page 6
@J PARTHENON GYROS
il EINP *AMf nn NfMi nnKpn rig

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