100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1980 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6--Saturday, October 4, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Bomb explodes near Paris

synagogue

PARIS (UPI)-A powerful car bomb
exploded outside a synagogue crowded
with worshippers yesterday, killing at
least four persons and injuring 24 in the
worst anti-Semitic attack in the history
of post-war France.
A caller claiming to represent a neo- i
fascist group, the European National
Fascists, took responsibility for the
blast outside the Rue C'opernic
synagogue near the Arch of Triumph in
one of Paris' fashionable residential
districts.

IN OTHER RECENT outbreaks of
anti-Semitism, Jewish graves were
defaced, fires set, and swastikas pain-
ted at kosher restaurants, Jewish-
owned stores and the homes of
prominent Jews.
Jewish organizations in Paris, alar-
med by the incidents, held a rally
Tuesday night around the memorial
that was strafed with gunfire. Eight
thousand persons showed up to protest
the attacks and demand a government
crackdown.

0

A YOUNG MAN SLIGHTLY injured in a bomb blast that killed four people and
injured 16 others outside a synagogue in Paris last night, displays his anger

AP Photo
a few minutes after the explosion. A right wing group claimed responsibility
for the attack.

Swiss candy spies fudge up

BERN, Switzerland (UPI)-Swiss counter-
espionage agents have tracked down a young man
and his girlfriend suspected of trying to sell Swiss
chocolate secrets to the Soviet Union and China, the
Justice Ministry said yesterday. The unnamed couple
will go on trial.
A ministry spokesman said the 26-year-old man
and his 19-year-old fiance offered to sell the recipes
for 40 different kinds of chocolates.
"THEY WERE HELD under arrest for three days
but are now free pending legal action on charges of
attempted economic espionage on behalf of foreign
powers," the spokesman said. "The whole affair is
more funny than serious, but the law is the law," the

spokesman continued.
The couple offered the chocolate secrets in letters
sent in mid-August to the Soviets and Chinese em-
bassies in Bern, the Swiss capital, a statement said.
Similar letters were sent to the East German and
Saudi Arabian embassies.
Justice ministry officials declined to reveal how
police-who then alerted the counter-espionage ser-
vice-learned of the letters.
"WE CAN'T GIVE out that kind of information,"
the ministry spokesman said.
Switzerland takes economic espionage very
seriously and officials at first were reluctant to give
any details at all about the affair.

The finally disclos'ed that the would-be chocolate
spies worked for the Suchard candy company, the
wonan as an apprentice.
Government officials said the man faces
prosecution for trying to sell industrial secrets while
the women probably will be charged with being an
accomplice.
"The charges will in all likelihood be less
severe than normal because no information actually
changed hands," one official said.
Switzerland takes a fairly benign attitudetowards
foreign spies-as long as the agents spy on each other
and not on the Swiss. With few political or military
secrets to hide, the Swiss take particular exception to
foreign spies out to obtain industrial information.

0

Census Bureau to appeal headcount ruling"

WASHINGTON (UPI)-The Census
Bureau asked the Justice Department
yesterday to appeal a ruling that
requires the bureau to revise the 1980
headcount by adding people who were
missed-and pinpoint local areas where
theylive.
Census Director Vincent Barabba
said the agency is seeking an appeal
because, "there is no feasible
statistically defensible" way to do such
*a detailed analysis of the undercount.

THE DECISION on whether to appeal
rests with the Justice Department's
solicitor-general. 1
A federal judge in Detroit ruled Sept.
25 that the Census Bureau must revise
its figures to include people who were
not counted-either because of
bureaucratic foul-ups or because they
avoided census takers.
The judge said until the problem is
resolved, no final census figures for
1980 can be reported to the president

and the states. The agency was given 30'
days to say how it would make the
change.
IN OTHER CENSUS developments
yesterday:,
Barabba said the new population
estimate ,is 227 million, including an
estimated undercount of 3.1 million or
about 1.4 per cent. The undercount is
gxclusive of illegal aliens missed by
census takers. The other 223.9 million
includes some illegal aliens reached by
the census.
" Massachusetts officials sued the
Census Bureau in federal court,
claiming a serious undercount in nine
specific towns and cities. State of-
ficials-like those in Detroit and
elsewhere-said they feared a loss of
federal funds and representation in
Congress.
CENSUS DATA is used in drawing
new House and state legislative district
lines each 10 years to determine allot-

ment of seats in the House of Represen-
tatives and to distribute some federal
funds.
After the 1970 census, the bureau
estimated it )-issed 2.5 per cent of the
population, excluding illegal aliens, and
felt the estimate was sound. But, said
Barabba, the bureau does not feel it can
defend the accuracy of an undercount
estimate down to the local level.
"We do not have.at this current time
... the ability to measure the extent of
undercount. We're very comfortable
with our estimates at the national
level," he said.
"So far, as we read the judge's order,
he is saying that now that you have
determined there are 'x' million people
missing throughout the country, you
will allocate them down to levels so that
we can redistrict as well as apportion.
We. . . do not have what we believe is a
statistically defensible procedure" to
accomplish that.

TONIGHT

CINEMA GUILD

PRESENTS

WOMEN IN LOVE
The D.H. Lawrence novel provided two sets of cross-cutting
loves in Provincial England during the WWI period. What
good old Ken Russell did was to place the situation into
sweeping, pulsating action. Moreover, the film gives a startl-
ing and biased depiction of the legendary Bloomsbury set
(who are they?), whom Lawrence loathed. With Bates, Reed,
Jackson, Linden. In color. 7:00 & 9:00 at LORCH HALL (which .
I still call Old A &.D).
"Aren't I enough for you?"-ursula.

aViewpoint lectures
aren't breaking even

I

(Continued from Page 1)
this year. Viewpoint also cut the num-
ber of paid-admission lectures from
eight per semester to three per
semester.
"We are taking a gamble that studen-
ts want to hear the major names," Car-
ter said. In addition to Nader and the
Alexander-Kilpatrick lectures,
Viewpoint hopes to have former Yippie
Abbie Hoffman speak on Nov. 6. The
group has a contract for Hoffman's ap-
pearance, but if he isn't out of prison, he
won't be coming to Ann Arbor.
Last year, two lectures-Gloria
Steinem and Jane Fonda-Tom
Hayden-were successful. Most of the
other 14 lectures-including those by
former ambassador to Iran William

Sullivan, feminist Bella Abzug, and
science fiction writer Joe
Haldeman-were "flops," Carter said.
ATTENDANCE AT the free lec-
tures-such as the Bullard talk-has
also dropped. "Last year the turnout was
at least fair enough so that the lecturer
stayed and gave a talk," Carter said.
Viewpoint officials are baffled by
declining attendance. Although the all
volunteer staff is small (it has only 10
active members) it has stepped-up
publicity this year, Carter said. More
than 200 signs were -posted advertising
Bullard's speech, and TAs and
professors were asked to announce the
lecture in classes.

01

0 NEW YORK

CHICAGO

DETROIT.

The
SUMMER BUSINESS
INTERN PROGRAM
OFFERS LSA SOPHS, JUNIORS, AND SENIORS THE OPPOR-
TUNITY TO GAIN PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE IN PAID INTERN-
SHIPS:
MARKETING, FINANCE, ADVERTISING, BANKING, PUBLIC
RELATIONS, ACCOUNTING, MEDIA, COMPUTER SCIENCE,
DETAILING. AND MOIREI

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan