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October 03, 1980 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Great Sunday Escape from Dorm Food at the
ORIENT EXPRESS
Daily Menu includes.

Page 12-Friday, October 3, 1980-The Michigan Daily

Holmes wins,

TKO in 10

4'

Won TonSou -.......................$ .65
egg Rolls ................... $1.10
Fried Rice .........................." $1.10
Teriyaki Beef ....................... $1.g79
Tempura Pork (sweatandsour).........$1.30
Szechuan Beef ...................... $2.75
Teriyaki Chicken (wth fred e....... $2.4S
Daily Specials including:
Almtond ChlCkn SeChuane OW
Eg FooVung Mot sour soup
- PEast carry-out and sit-down service
HOURS: Monday thru Saturday-11a.m. - 10 p.m.
Sunday-3:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
342 S. State at E. William, Ann Arbor [
Call: 668-1333

Ali fails in bid to
gam inl for 4th timeW

SPtcIAL
Bring this ad k receive a
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with any purchase.
Expires Nov. 1, 1980
Open
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ARMY SURPLUS
3 Entire Stock of New 1981
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This ad must be submitted for this sale,
- --SALE ENDS OCTOBER 4, 1980' I
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By GARY LEVY and
MIKE BRADLEY
Larry Holmes scored a 10th-
round technical knockout over
Muhammed All last night at
Las Vegas' Caesar's Palace,
and retained his World Boxing
Council Heavyweight cham-
pionship.
The victory for Holmes was
his eighth straight title defense.
His record now stands at 36-0.
Holmes started to assert himself in
the ninth round as he pinned Ali against
the corner and started to unload on him.
The 10th round was much of the same,
as Ali was defenseless to the barrage of
punches levied by Holmes..Both of Ali's
.aeyes were swollen when the fight was
called by referee Bichard Green.
Holmes came out the aggressor at the
opening bell and Ali used a bonafide
rope-a-dope and covered up all over the
ring through the entire opening round.
Neither boxer landed a solid punch.
ALI OPENED up his style in the
second and continuously taunted
Holmes with his fists, but again neither
v ~fighter connected with a substantial:
AP Photo blow. Ali threw only a couple of punches
in the opening round.
BERNARDO MERCADO of Colombia, left, gives an uppercut to former heavy- Ali began to throw punches in the
weight champion Leon Spinks during their bout last night at Caesars Palace third round, but he still chose to toy
in Las Vegas. Mercado, who was the number one WBC contender, was de- with the champion.
feated by Spinks by technical knockout in the ninth round. Holmes scored several times with

REPORTED INJUR Y TALL Y HITS 210:
I.M. athletes a

r , ..

By MARK FISCHER
Injuries are part of sports. Famous
sports ailments-like Kareem Abdul-
Jabbar's scratched eyes, Mark!
Fidrych's torn shoulder, or Darryl
Stingley's tragic paralysis-often
remind us of this fact. Yet all athletes,
be they pros or beginners, are subject
to injury. Michigan intramural athletes
are no exception.
In fact, according to Intramural
Sports Building Supervisor-Sandy San-
ders, I.M. injuries "happen every day
to different degrees." Over the last
year (from September 1979 to date), the
Intramural Department has received
210 injury reports. The reported in-
juries, all of which occured in or on (M.
sports facilities during either drop-in or
competitive activities, varied in scope
and seriousness.
"In general," said Intramural
Department head Earl Edwards, "the
injuries are typical-sprained ankles,
sprained knees. When you consider the
size of the (intramural) program, the
number of injuries reported is very
small. Many aren't reported, though."
By far the most "painstaking" sport
last year was basketball, which accoun-
ted for roughly two-thirds of all repor-
ted injuries. And apparently not enough

high tops were worn, as more than half
the hoopsters hurt suffered sprained
ankles.
However, as I.M. official supervisor
Moby Benedict noted, the large number
of intramural basketball injuries is
caused mainly by the large number of
intramural basketball players.
"Proportionally," said Benedict,
"there are more injuries in football
than any other sport, due to the con-
tact."
The most frequent football injuries
consisted of sprained knees. Yet sub-
stantially more contact-related in-
juries-like bloody noses, head
lacerations, bruises, and
dislocations-occurred on the football
field than anywhere else. One footballer
suffered a broken nose, another a slight
concussion..
"There're more cuts and lacerations,
gashes over the eye-that sort of thing
(in football)," said Edwards. "But even
then the frequency is not that high."
Though the injury count is small, as
Edwards said, the I.M. department is
doing what it can to keep it that way.
"As a staff we try to be very
cognizant as far as safety," said Ed-
wards. "If there're volleyball nets or
clothes under baskets we move them, if

jabs in the fourth as Ali remained oh the
rope, -and threw an occasional punch'or
two. .
Ali came out dancing in the fifth but,
Holmes showed up Ali's gains with a
wiggle of his own and kept him in the
corners with constant Tabs. '
In the top preliminary bout, formrer"
heavyweight champion Leon Spink,
scored a ninth-round technical
knockout over the number one WBC
contender, Bernardo Mercado, with a
series of powerful left hooks.
With approximately 16 seconds left in
round nine, Spinks (10-2-2) caught Mer-
cado with a roundhouse left hook that
staggered the weary challenger. He
followed with another left and several
combinations before referee Ferd Her-
nandez stopped the bout with dightW
seconds remaining in the round.
Both boxers charged at one another
to open the fight. Then Mercado cise
to lay back and counter punch wile
Spinks remained the agressor. kuer-
cado controlled the opening round, but
Spinks slowly but surely dominated
round by round and had Mercado 85n-
tinually on the ropes as the fight wore
on to its finish.
AT APPROXIMATELY 8 ~. #
microwaves which were to transmit the
fight blew the circuits in the tower of
Eastern Michigan University's Bowen
Field House and forced cancellation of
the telecast there. Tickets good forthe
Bowen location were honored at Joe
Louis Arena in Detroit and the Pontiac
Silverdome.
ii, too
there're holes in fields we, f Il
them-when there's a problem areaWe
try to jump on it."
Benedict agreed: "I think we're oit
well. All the supervisors are trained in
CPR and First Aid. We emphasize to of
ficials to watch problem areas. We feel
we're giving people the best protection
as we can.
Despite such precautions, injuries
will happen when sports are played.
Even the football concussion victim
(who wished to remain anonymous)
stressed that "for people who par-
ticipate there's a chance that
something like that will happen."
Bill Gray, a veteran intramural of-
ficial, added, "I don't know of any in-
jury that's been the result of a
malicious act by anybody. It's mostly
players who are out of shape or who
have no control of their bodies."
a,
GR IDDE PICKS:
Muhammed Ali and Larry Holmes
would both trade their big fight for a
chance to win this week's Griddes. B4
the champ by picking the winners from
the games listed below. The prize nosy
not be $10 million, but a small one-i"
Pizza Bob's pizza is almost worth t~at
much.. Just remember to get l4 e
picks down to the Daily office, c0
Maynard, by midnight tonight.
1. California at MICHIGAN
(Pick score)
2. Notre Dame at Michigan St.
3. UCLA at Ohio St.
4. Miami (O.) at Purdue
5. Duke at Indiana
6. San Diego St. at Wisconsin
7. Arizona at Iowa
8. Mississippi St. at Illinois
9. Minnesota at Northwestern
10. Toledo at Central Mich.
11. Bowling Green at Western Mich.
12. Arizona St. at Southern Cal. '

13. Penn St. at Missouri
14. Florida St. at Nebraska .
15. Maryland at Pittsburgh
16. SMU at Tulane
17. Houston at Baylor
18. Boston College at Navy
19. Slippery Rock at Dayton
20. Detroit Dust Biters at DAILY LIBELS

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STOCK NO. SIZE DESCRIPTION
PL700 700C x 25 Bicycles Using 700C x 25 High Pressure Tires
PL900 27 x 1 Low Profile-High Presure Tire
PL800 r 24 x 1.75 27" High Pressure Tires Or 700C x 28
. PL200 700C x 28 27" High Pressure Tires (85-95 tbs.)
PL10Q 27 x 1.1/4 27" Standard Pressure Tires (50-75 lbs.)
PL300 27 x 1.1/4 26" Standard (EA3) Rims And Tires
k26 x 1.3/8 Except Schwinn And Raleigh
PJ.580 .24 x 1.3/8 Bicycles Using 24" Tires'
PL400 26 x 1.3/8 Schwinn And Raleigh Using 26" Tires
PL600 20 x 1.75 Bicycles Using 20" Standard Or BMX Tires
Except Schwinn%.."
PL1000 26 x 1.75 Bicycles Using 26 x 1.75 Tres
PL1000 24 x 1.75 Bicycles Using 24 x 1.75 Tires
UNDERLINE SIZE
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Advancement De
Not Require An
Advan ced Degree
You can spend another two to three years in graduate
school oryou can turn four years of liberal arts education into
a practical, challenging and rewarding career in just three
months-as an Employee Benefit Specialist.
Benefits today amount from 30 to 35 percent of wages
and salaries. Recent pension legislation has created even
more demand for trained specialists. As an Employee
Benefit Specialist you'll be called upon to excercise your.
own judgement, initiative and intelligence in a challenging,
professional environment with progressive responsibility.
The Institute for Employee Benefits Training is the first and
most prestigious school in the United States, training
Employee Benefits and Pension Specialists. This is a
dynamic, growing career field in which advancement does
not require an advanced degree. Our graduates are in
demand by law firms, pension consulting firms, insurance
companies, banks, and personnel and benefits departments
of corporations. The Institute's Placement Service will place
you too. If not, you will be eligible for a substantial tuition
refund.
Furthermore, you will earn graduate credit towards a
Master of Arts in Legal Studies through Antioch School of
Law for all course work completed at The Institute.
If you're a senior of high academic standing and looking for
a meaningful career, contact your Placement Office for
our catalog and arrange to have an interview with our repre-
sentative.
We will visit your campus on: Thursday, October 9

I
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Scores
Baseball
American League
Chicago 9, Oakland 4
Boston 4, Toronto 1
Minnesota 6, Texas 3
Kansas City 6, Seattle 2
National League
Houston 3, Atlanta 2
NHL Exhibition Hockey
Hartford 4.Detroit -

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