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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1980 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-03

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COUNSELINGSERVICES IS NOW
OFFERING THE FOLLOWING COUNSELING GROUPS:
SOCIAL SKILLS: This therapy group for men and women will focus on
difficulties in initiating and maintaining interpersonal relationships. Such tech-
niques as relaxation, assertiveness training and communication skill building
will be used.
WOMEN WITH WEIGHT PROBLEMS: This group combines discussion, insight,
support and some behavior modification to help women deal with weight
problems.
GENERAL THERAPY: Personal problems, particularly those that appear in
interpersonal dilemmas, will be addressed in a coed setting.
MINORITY ISSUES: This counseling-therapy group is designed for black men
and women to deal with minority concerns such as self-concept, procrastina-
tion, racism and coping with the realities of being a black student.
THE SUPERWOMAN SYNDROME: This counseling group is designed for
women in graduate rograms who are facing the "t-have-to-do-it-all" dilemma.
Areas of focus will be personal values exploration, family and societal mes-
sages, life planning concerns, support systems and models for health living.
FAMILY-CENTERED THERAPY: This is an in-depth therapy group for individuals
who are concerned about family and relationship issues. Emphasis will be
placed on examinin connections between present life situations and relation-
ships and the individual's experiences growing up in his/her family.
PURPOSE. ANOMIE & SELF-DIRECTION-CONFLICTS BEING A STUDENT:
This group will be directed at assisting students who are confused about
academic/vocational/lifestyle goals. Men and women in undergraduate or
graduate programs are welcome.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, WALK IN AT 3106 MICHIGAN UNION OR CALL
ANNE AT 764-312.

Page 2--Friday, October 3, 1 980-The Michigan Daily
Crisler to beef up
security or 'Boss'

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

(Continued from Page 1)
fice for the past year, tickets for a rock
concert have never gone so fast.
Springsteen is regarded by many
University students as one of Ann Ar-
bor's most popular rock musicians, and

the release of a new Springsteen album
has been eagerly anticipated by fans.
"At least 40 people came into the
store yesterday afternoon to ask about
the new album," Will Lovick, an em-
ployee at Discount Records on State
Street said yesterday. He said the
album should be released Oct. 20.
"We've seen a lot of excitement and
enthusiasm for this concert," Young
said. "From the types of people we've
seen come to get tickets, we don't an-
ticipate any problems. People are just
anxious to have a good time."

0

Bill cutting road tests
passes in Michigan House
LANSING-A House bill eliminating road test requirements for persons
passing a driver education course passed this week by a vote of 81 to 13.
The measure, which was designed to save the state an estimated $500,0O
from its ever-tightening budget, has been sent to the governor for approval.
Opponents of the bill, including state Sen. Jack Faxon, say the bill is a:
dangerous one, because there is no proven correlation between successful
completion of driver education courses and driving skill.

I

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION
(Required by 39 U.S.C..3A85)
1. TITLE OF PUBLICATION APUBLICA TION NO. 2. DATE OF FILING
The iohigan Daily .Oct.1 1 098O_
3. FREQUENCY OFiSSUE A. OF ISSUES PUBLISHEDfB. ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION
ANNUALLYPRICE
Daily except onay rg.shool e ___ r 7_ --_- 8,5
a. LOCATION OF KNOWN OFFICE OF PUBLICATION (Street, City. Conty, State and I)P Code) (u oprinter,)
420 1ayard Ann r ,.....1.9
5. LOCATION OF THE HEADOUARTERS OR GENERAL BUSINESS OFFICES OF THE PUBLISHERS INot printers)
4,20 1'anadAmn Arbor MeI.4810
. NAMES AND COMPLETE ADDRESSES OF PUBLISHER, EDITOR, AND MANAGING EDITOR
PUBLISHER (Name and Address)
3o Fo 5r udn ica , 4 Ann Arbor, I. 481 09
EDITOR (Name andt Address)
sark Parrent, 428 inzilton PlaceL Ann Arbor, II. 48104
MANAGINGE OITOR (Name and Address)
Niitchell Gantor, 822 Uakland, Ann Arbor, MI. 4:104
7. OWNER (If toind hr' a (-orfiora(it. fitsranv crd addre'ss mut hetsared anld also, tnlnia l.theI.reunde'r (II-naittes and addresrt of sltck-
holdrs ou-nb or holding jpercent Urenwre of torsd anli tnrt of sht'6. II/nu tolsnd biy a iorlurith oii (n ,rtanitan id< aIsfSt he liIijridnalM
iiN'ersM ust he giren. If mtine'd r a partnership ur other unniurporaed firm. its na, and addre,. as 8 elt as lI aGl ealsh indiidual must he
xiving. If the puhlivation is published hr a nonprofii orcani:atn,. its name and address msthe I sated-1
NAME -ADDRESS
S. KNOWN BONDHOLDERS. MORTGAGEES AND OTHER SECURITY HOLDERS OWNING OR HOLDING 1 PERCENT OR MORE OF
TOTAL AMOUNT OF BONDS, MORTGAGES OR OTHER SECURITIES 1ff trher are nnc eo state)
1111NAME '.-- - ADDRESSI
,. FOR COMPLETION BY NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS AUTHORIZED TO MAIL AT SPECIAL RATES (Section 132 122. PS1)
The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for Federal income tax purposes (Check one)

The word's out on ampus .
If you want to be in the know, you should
be reading The Daily
.. the latest in news, sports, -les affoires
academiques, and entertainment.ssy
CALL 764-0558 to order your subscription today

- 3

I>

J NAVE NOT CHANGED DURING HAVECHANGED DURING
PRECEDING 12 MONTHS Q. PRECEDING 12 MONTHS

(! chiangerd, pa usheair nmust aubmit e cxptaatoioiiof change
wi'ithi this statemnt.)

1. EXTENT AND NATURE OF CIRCULATION
A. TOTAL NO. COPIES PRINTED (Net Pree, Run)
R. PAID CIRCULATION
1, SALES THROUGH DEALERS AND CARRIERS. STREET
VENDORS AND COUNTER SALES'
2. MAIL SUOSCRIPTIONS
C. TOTAL PAID CIRCULATION (Sum of 1631 and 10B2)
". FREE DISTRIBUTION BY MAIL. CARRIER OR OTHER MEANS
'SAMPLES. COMPLIMENTARY. AND OTHER FREE COPIES
E. TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (Smof C and D!
F.CPIES NOT DISTRIBUTED
. OFFICE USE, LEFT OVER, UNACCOUNTED. SPOILED
AFTER PRINTI NG6 _ _
2. RETURNS FROM NEWS AGENTS
G. TOTAL (Sum of . F1 and 2 should equal net press run shown
InAl

AVERAGE NO. COPIES EACH
ISSUE DURING PRECEDING
12 MONTHS
3119. -
E 1568
4487
100
4587
200
50
4, 37

ACTUAL NO. COPIES OP SINGLE
SE PUBLSHED NEAREST TO
P ILING DATE
ID^- -
5173
112
585
S445
4i 70
f 1-1600

1,HTIS WEEI
MONDOY
PIZZA NIGHT
-1
JAM SES
1 ' live music, n
I
I
AF
~1
-I-
-I-

'thy

WEDNESD
BOAT NIGH

(Ou
fly
T
URSDOY
HER NIGHT
SOIT
ON E
no cover
- '
University
I11

LA smog relief expected
LOS ANGELES-Smog over this city is expected to ease as the tempera-
ture cools, following the hottest Oct. 1 in 74 years. Still, people wept and
sneezed yesterday as smog kept its choke hold on southern California for the
third straight day.
Usually only a southern California phenomenon, the smog spread to the
San Francisco area on Wednesday, causing the first Bay area smog alert
since Oct. 2, 1978. Smog in a four-county southern California smog zone had
its heaviest day since 1974 on Wednesday, according to ozone readings by the
state Air Resources Board.
The Air Quality Management District suggested that motorists stay:
home this weekend, and physical education activities were canceled in Santa
Clara County schools.
Reagan woos steel workers
Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan repeatedly mocked
President Carter yesterday in a campaign trip to steel mills in Pittsburgh
and Green Bay, Wis.
Reagan told steelworkers in Pittsburgh that Carter's plan to revitalize.
the steel industry was nothing more than a copy of his own program and
called it "follow-the-leader-politics." In Green Bay, he blamed the president:
for the troubles facing the steel and housing industries, saying lower taxes
and less government are the keys to recovery.

4

01

iPITC

FRI 8
SECTI
live music,

SIGNATURE AND TITLE OF EDITOR. PUBL iH ,BU$fN ESS j
it I certify that the statements made by me MANAGER. DR OWN
above are correct and complete. 3usin
FOR COMPLETION BY PUBLISHERS MAILlNG AT THE REGULAR RATES (Section 132.121. Posta Serder .Manual)
38 U. S. C. 3626 provldes in pertinent part: "No parson who would have been entitled tto mall matter under fornmer settIon 4359 of this title
shalt mail such matter at the rates provided under this subsection unles he Ines annually with the Postal Servco a written requestt or. pernmission
toM olI matter at such rates."
In accordance with the provisions of this statute, I thereby' request permission to mail the publication naried nttern 1 at the-ifated postage
?rtes presently authorized by 39 U. S. C. 3626.
SIGNATURE AND TITLE OF EDITOR, PUBLISHER. BUSINESS MANAGER, OR OWNER

1140S.
668-841

U V

Senate subcommittee votes
disapproval of Billy Carter
WASHINGTON-In a report approved by voice vote with no dissents,
a special Judiciary subcommittee of the United States Senate decided
President Carter was ."ill-advised" to use his younger brother as a go-
between with Libyan officials in an effort to use Arab help to free the U.S.
hostages in Iran.
The Senate investigators also voiced "severe criticism" yesterday of
Billy Carter for his Libyan dealings, and criticized some of the President's
top aides as well, including Attorney General Benjamin Civiletti, for in-
sinuating that "criminal proceedings would not be instituted if Billy Carter
registered as a foreign agent."
Carter refutes Reagan policy
DAYTON, Ohio-President Carter called Ronald Reagan's suggestion
of a stepped-up nuclear arms race silly, yesterday, saying that such a move
would not cause Soviet concession, and suggested it might actually hinder
further arms control negotiations.
The Republican presidential candidate told The Associated Press Wed-
nesday that as president, he would abandon the country's Strategic Arms
Limitation Treaty (SALT II) with the Soviet Union, and that he would pursue
new negotiations with the Russians, while simultaneously building U.S.
defenses.
Carter refuted that idea, saying there would be "no way we or the Soviet
Union would negotiate for future arms control if both sides were madly
building nuclear weapons."
Lawyer swears Vesco paid
to set meeting with Carter
WASHINGTON-Georgia lawyer W. Spencer Lee IV told a Senate
subcommitte yesterday that he was paid nearly $11,000, and promised an
additional $1 million in 1977 to set up a meeting between Carter ad-'
ministration officials and fugitive financier Robert L. Vesco.
Lee said he was instructed to tell government officials that Vesco codld
be instrumental in gaining approval of the Panama Canal treaty Presidert;'
Carter was seeking because of Vesco's influence in Latin America.
Lee denied that Carter administration officials were to receive money,
themselves if they agreed to Isiten to Vesco.

I

0

...

p

01

After working this hard for a degree, it
would be nice to put it to use immediately. A
lot of companies promise the moon in that re-
spect, but not that many follow through.
At Mostek, we're in the unique position
of having highly sought after products and'
technological innovations. As a result, our
employees are challenged to use their knowl-
edge and skills from the day they start
to w rk.
Fast Advancement. Recently, Mostek's
growth rate has been doubling annually. Ex-
pansion provides plenty of room for rapid up-
ward advancement and lateral movement
within the company.
A Creative Working Environment.
Mostek is an innovation-oriented company, so
we understand the importance of a stimulat-
ing working atmosphere. You'll find a relaxed
yet professional environment, with each indi-
vidual striving to achieve both personal and
company goals.
A Widely Respected Company.
There's no doubt that Mostek is recognized
as a leading innovator and manufacturer of
advanced electronic circuits and systems.
Wo' otaki c ssi rlo vrs..sariorchin sin s Se-

components and systems include some of
the industry's most powerful products.
Exceptional Company Benefits.
People are the main resource at Mostek. So
you can be sure they're well taken care of.
Company benefits include very competitive
salaries, group insurance (including dental), a
generous profit sharing/retirement plan, paid
educational benefits and more.
Living In Dallas. You'll find that Dallas
has moderate weather much of the year. So
you can enjoy outdoor sports such as fishing,
skiing, swimming, and camping as well as all
kinds of professional and amateur sporting
events.
Plus, Dallas is a leading cultural center
with symphony, summer musicals, opera and
year round concerts.
A Company That Makes The Grade.
It would be unusual for your first career deci-
sion to turn out to be your last. But with a
company like Mostek, it happens all the time.
That's because here, your major isn't wasted
on minor activities.
Sign up at your Placement Office for
Mostek's on-campus interviews. For more in-

hbe Midtijwu n atid
Volume XCI, No. 26
Friday, October 3, 1980 k
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the Universit'
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through'Sunday mornings during tk '
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109,;
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday,
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ahn
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER-:;
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is o member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press Internationa5
Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Snjdicate and Field Newspaper Syndicate...
News room: (313) 764-0552. 76-DAILY; Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising;
764-0557: Display advertising: 764-0554: Billing: 764.0550: Composing room: 764-0556.
Editor-in-Chief .. .................. MARK PARRENTA'
Managing Editor... . . MITCH CANTOR Business Manager ..... ... ROSEMARY WICKOWIKi.'
City Editor ...................... PATRICIA HAGEN Soles Manager................ KRISTINA PETERSON,
University Editor ................... TOMAS MIRGA Ooerations Manocer............ KATHLEEN CULVEI
Features Editor .............. . ...BETH ROSENBERG Co-Display Manager :.. ..... .... DONNA DREBIII.
Opinion Page Editors ................ JOSHUA PECK - Co-Display Manager ........... ROBERT THOMPSOt4-,
HOWARD WITT Classified Manager ...... . . ........ SUSAN KLING _
Sunday Page Editor .............. ADRIENNE LYONS Finance Manager . .............. GREGG HADDAb,.'
Arts Editor ..M................... MRK COLEMAN Nationals Manager................. LISA JORDAN',
DENNIS HARVEY Circulation Manager ......... TERRY DEAN REDDINGZ.
Sort Eitr-.............:.ALAN FANGER c-1 r_-4;_.- . ...---~ccc r '

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