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October 02, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page 10-Thursday, October 2, 1980-The Michigan Daily
SHARING TAILBACK SPOT WIT H WOOLFOLK
Ricks: super sophomore!

By STAN BRADBURY
Butch Woolfolk was the all-Big Ten tailback last
year. Butch Woolfolk led the conference in scoring
and had 990 yards rushing as a sophomore a year ago.
Butch Woolfolk was a rising star.
But Woolfolk isn't even leading Michigan in rushing
this year; that honor goes to this year's super-
sophomore tailback, Lawrence Ricks.
AFTER THREE GAMES, it is Ricks who has
dominated the Michigan rushing attack, not
Woolfolk. Ricks has led the Wolverines in rushing in
their first outings, averaging an impressive 6.0 yards
per carry, and has 229 total yards to date.
But such a turnabout does not appear to phase the
modest, somewhat shy Ricks. Not much does.
When Ricks was a senior at Barberton (Ohio) High
School, Michigan had three tailbacks on the depth
charts: Woolfolk, Stanley Edwards, and Roosevelt
Smith. Both Woolfolk and Edwards had three years of
eligibility left at the time.
THAT DIDN'T BOTHER Ricks. "All I asked Bo for
was a chance," said the computer science major.
"Bo was very straightforward when he talked about

the tailback position. That impressed me."
So Ricks knew exactly what to expect during his
freshman season: not much. Ricks carried the ball
just 22 times, netting 100 yards, but Woolfolk seemed
firmly entrenched as Michigan's tailback of the future.
That also didn't distrub Ricks who eagerly awaited a
chance to prove himself in spring drills.
When spring blossomed Ricks made the most of it.
Edwards was moved permanently to, fullback and
while Woolfolk was running track, Edwards was ear-
ning himself a starting spot in the Blue-White game.
IT WAS HARD for Ricks or anyone else to imagine
he could be better than Woolfolk after Woolfolk had
proven he was better than nearly every other
tailback in the Big Ten.,
Woolfolk and Ricks are a contrast of styles.
Woolfolk, a 6-2, 207 pound speedster likes to go wide
and beat the defense around the corner, while Ricks
(5-10, 200 pounds), who possesses great upper-body
strength and a low center of gravity, runs at defenses
like a bowling ball. He's also the toughest Michigan
ball carrier to tackle.
"I LIKE THE power style offense attack," said
Ricks, "because I'm a north-south (straight ahead)
runner."

Although Woolfolk started the Northwestern and
South Carolina contests this year, Ricks still came off
the bench to lead Michigan in rushing and started the
Notre Dame game.
The statistical race between Ricks and Woolfolk,
which Ricks leads 229 to 168 yards, although Woolfolk
leads in starts with two, is a healthy one.
"HE'S REALLY HELPED me to come along,"
said Ricks of Woolfolk. "Butch is like my best friend,
really. I go to talk to him a lot at times."
Ricks added that he is finding his situation at
Michigan very favorable. "This is really what I want.
I'd rather be doing this than anything else. I think I
can handle the pressure of starting," he said.
But when the modest Ricks ran out of things to say
about himself, he appeared more concerned with the
team. "If I'm playing or not, I like for us to win. I'm
trying to keep a good attitude about things because
once we stop making mistakes, we'll be good. I know
we can play good ball with anybody.
"WE WERE REALLY down after the (South
Carolina) game. We knew we put our backs to the
wall now," said Ricks. "I think a lot of guys are going
to go after it."

Daily Photo by LISA KLAUSNER
POWERFUL MICHIGAN TAILBACK Lawrence Ricks evades a South Carolina
tackler for part of the 87 yards he picked up against the Gamecocks. Ricks
is this year's offensive find, leading all Michigan runners with 229 yards and
a 6.0 yard carry average despite starting the season behind two-game starter
Butch Woolfolk.

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the University of Michigan in the Sun
Bowl National Golf Championships to
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Morse, a native of Battle Creek, was
a third team All-American and Big Ten
champion last seasor. He was also run-
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ch Play held in Charlevoix, Michigan.
He lost to his teammate Steve Mad-
dalena in the championship round.

By DREW SHARP,
'ABC-TV has yet to decide whether it
will broadcast the Michigan-Ohio State
gridiron clash November 22, a top net-
work executive said yesterday.
"The selection of that week's game is
not a closed issue," said Donn Ber-
nstein, a spokesman for ABC Sports. "I
don't know why everyone up there (in
Michigan) is taking such a negative
look at this situation. There is no way
that we can decide which game we are

going to cover right now because there
is no telling how these teams are going
to play in the coming weeks."
Bernstein said he was angered by a
story that appeared in yesterday's
Detroit Free Press which stated the
game might not be televised for the fir-
st time in more than a decade.
The uncertainty over the broadcast of
the game stems from a scheduling con-
flict, Bernstein said. Oklahoma and
Nebraska, two bitter Big Eight rivals
whose domination of that conference
has paralleled the Michigan-Ohio State
domination of the Big Ten, are also
scheduled to play on that date. Since
neither Ohio Stadium or Memorial

ABC MA Y DROP GAME:

three TV appearances last season
irrelevant to the network's current
plans.
"Exception' games are those games
whose dates have been changed (with
both schools' permission) to help the
network broadcast more "quality" con-
tests, Bernstein said.Four games were
rescheduled this season to assist the
network, he added. The Arkansas-
Texas battle was moved up to Labor
Day, Purdue and Notre Dame played
September 6 instead of September 27,
Pittsburgh and Penn State agreed to
play the Friday following
Thanksgiving, and Southern California@
and Notre Dame worked out a matchup

Coverage shaky for Blue-OSU

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'I don't know why everyone up there (in Michigan) is taking
such a negative look at this situation. There is no way that we
can decide which game we are going to cover right now be-
cause there is no telling how these teams are going to play in
the coming weeks.'
-Donn Bernstein, spokesman for ABC Sports

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Stadium in Lincoln are equipped with
lights, the network eliminated the
possibility of broadcasting a
doubleheader.
Bernstein explained that a team is
granted four television appearances
every two years-either one national
and one regional appearance per year,
or two regional appearances per year.
He added that a team may appear for a=
fifth game during the cycle if it either
plays on an "exception" date, or ap-
pears in the network's "wild card"
game.
Michigan is in the first year of its two-
year cycle, thus making the Wolverines

for the first Saturday in December.
"We got in ┬░touch with the respective
schools and asked them if they wanted
to move one of the games back a week
later to November 29, but neither
school wanted to do it," said Bernstein.
Assistant Athletic Director Will
Perry said he was not aware ABC
contacted the athletic department and
asked to have the game moved back a
week.
"I haven't heard-anything from Don
(Athletic Director Canham) about the
possibility of switching the date of the
game, so I can't honestly say why the
game was turned down," said Perry.

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