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October 02, 1980 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-10-02

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 2, 1980-Page 5
House rushes bill
on abortion funding

WASHINGTON (AP)-Congress,
worried about political fallout over its
letting the government run out of,
money five weeks before Election Day,
quickly resolved a dispute over abor-
tion funds yesterday and passed an
emergency-spending bill.
By voice vote, and without debate,
the House accepted compromise Senate
language on new restrictions for
federally funded abortions and sent the
bill to President Carter for his
signature.
The prompt House action averted a
financial crisis for the government,
much of which was left without
authority to spend money when the new
fiscal year began yesterday with the
stopgap-spending bill tied up on the
abortion issue.
DESPITE THAT impasse, the
federal government appeared to
operate normally yesterday although
some agencies said they were
preparing to shut down in compliance
with a recent ruling by Attorney
General Benjamin Civiletti.
. In an opinion issued when funds ran
out for the Federal Trade Commission,
Civiletti said last April that federal of-
ficials could not legally incur expenses
unless spending was authorized by
Congress.
Although the FTC actually closed
down briefly twice last spring, House
Speaker Thomas O'Neill Jr. said that
normally, agencies continue to operate.
"I NEVER DID see the government
stop," O'Neill said. "The law says you
can't operate at a certain day without
funding and they (federal officials)
always blink at that. . . . I hope they
continue to."
Although almost every year some
federal agencies are threatened with a

shutdown over money difficulties, such
a predicament has never before con-
fronted virtually the entire gover-
nment.
When the new fiscal year started
yesterday without a single regular ap-
propriations bill enacted, some agen-
cies went into neutral-carrying out
only activities needed to protect life and
property-while others operated nor-
mally.
But overall there were few signs of a
government coming to a halt. The Of-
fice of Personnel Management had in-
structed the federal bureaucracy's five
million employees to go to work as
usual yesterday.
And the government continued to pay
its bills as usual. While the
congressional bottleneck meant that
federal agencies, briefly, could not take
on new obligations, the Treasury
Department continued to pay for items
already purchased.
SMETfHING
DIFFERENT?
IN LITERATURE, PSYCHOLOGY,
SEMANTICS, & DRAMA
Three collections of works
of Phil King s.f. short stories
& short musical comedies
$5.00ea
Phil King Publishing
co Carter's Beach
Erie, Pa. 16511

Daily Photo by DAVID HARRIS
PRESIDENT CARTER, flanked by United Auto Workers' president Douglas Fraser (left) and Rep. William Ford (D-
Taylor) speaks in Wayne.
Carter campaigns on birthday
*for labor vote in Michigan

(Continued from Page 1)
try-re-elect President Jimmy Car-
ter."
MANY AUTO workers seemed to
share Fraser's resolve.
"I was with him all the way,"
William Slack, a utilities worker said.
"Ifeel he's capable of doing the job."
*: Reginald Amerson, a maintenance
0'worker, said he would vote for Carter
because "you know what you got. I
don't know anything about Reagan," he
Isaid.
PLANT OFFICIALS shut down the
busy Ford assembly line to allow em-
ployees to hear Carter speak outside
the sprawling Wayne complex, where
he was presented with a four-tier birth-
day cake and a large card signed by
hundreds of employees.
Responding to a faltering chorus of
" Happy Birthday," Carter quipped,
"It's a good thing you can make autos a
lot better-than you can sing."
As the crows responded with laughter
and cheers, one UAW Local 900 com-
mitteeman said, "You won't find no
Reagan fans around here."
BUT a number of workers, even as
they cheered the President, said they
were not completely sold on their
choices in November.
"I'm undecided," said driver Charles
Tipton. "Nobody I know has made up
his mind yet."
Peter Mavridis, a Greek native and
11-year maintenance worker, said he
has become disillusioned with the
American system. "This is a beautiful
country and there's a lot of progress
here," he said. "But I've seen freedoms
taken away from some and given to

someone else. To me, the two parties
seem virtually the same."
-BLAMING much of America's
problems on the price of OPEC oil, Car-
ter told the workers, "We must rise to
meet this challenge."
Carter urged consumers to give
workers, the chance to compete by
buying American cars.
He said the government will buy
thousands of American-made new cars
and trucks in the next few months and
pledged to equip the car companies
with the capital they need to "re-tool,
compete, and retain their rightful share
of the American auto market."
CARTER URGED foreign
automakers to "practice restraint" in.
their U.S. marketing effort and to build
more plants here.
"The United States will not abandon
any portion of our share of the domestic
auto market. I expect our foreign com-
petition to practice restraint during the
time of transition, as I have counseled
them to do," he said to workers' cheers.
Carter said his administration has
asked the International Trade Com-
mission to "give us an early ruling" on
whether Japanese manufacturers were
guilty of unfair practices in exports to
the U.S.
Following the Wayne plant tour, Car-
ter flew to Flint to attend a town
Daily Classifieds
Get Results!
Call 764-0557

meeting at Northern High School.
The President fielded questions on
world events, commenting that the
Iran-Iraq war has neither endangered
the lives of the American hostages in
Iran nor increased the "prospects for
their return."

SENIORSI INTERVIEW NOW
LEARN NOW EASY AND CONVENIENT IT IS
FOR YOU TO INTERVIEW FOR A JOB OR GRADUATE
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL ADMISSION.
EVEN IF YOU ARE GRADUATING IN
MAY
IT IS NOT TOO EARLY TO START INTERVIEWING NOW.
YOU ARE INVITED TO LEARN HOW TO TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF THIS OPPORTUNITY BY ATTENDING:
"THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWING"
DATE: OCTOBER 6th and 7th, 1980
TIME: 4:00-5:00 p.m.
PLACE: CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
3200 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUtLDiNG
A'BRIEFING ON EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
RECRUITING AND ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWING

L '

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Contact your College Placement Office to,
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We'll be on your campus Thursday, Oct. 9.

General Dynamics' representatives
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General Dynamics, a Fortune 100
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we have a wide range of programs in
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For more information on careers in
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sure to pick up one of our brochures at
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Or, if you prefer, send your
resume to:
BILL COLEMAN, Corporate College
Relations Administrator
GENERAL DYNAMICS
Pierre Laclede Center, CN- 4
St. Louis, MO 63105

I

An Eaua~ l Oonortu nity EFrnnoverI

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