100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 28, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Sunday, September 28, 1980-The Michigan Daily

ocks subdue Blue, 1714
(Continued from Page 1 )

Michigan had the first genuine scoring
opportunity with about six minutes left
in the stanza. Rogers, who had moved
the ball out from SC's own 20 to the 31 in
two carries, left the field for a tem-
porary breather, and on the next play,
backup Percy Reeves fumbled and
Bluerlinebacker Mel Owens fell on it at
the 28 yard line.
Wolverine tailback Butch Woolfolk
cut off right tackle for a 20-yard burst
and then added on four more up the
middle to the Gamecock four on the
next play. But on third down from the
one, Wangler fumbled the center snap,
and on the next play, Woolfolk dropped
the pitchout, and Michigan had squan-
dered the opportunity.
With Rogers carrying seven times for
28 yards, South Carolina mounted its
first drive over a five-minute span in
the second period. The Gamecocks ad-
vance the ball from their 25 to the
Michigan nine but stalled there and set-
tled for a chip-shot 26-yard field goal by
Eddie Leopard to take a 3-0 lead.
Wangler tosses of 19 yards to Mitchell
and 18 yards to Carter and the latter's
leaping TD grab in the right side of the
end zone were the big plays in
Michigan's 80-yard march to a 7-3 lead
with 2:54 showing on the clock.

Bo slips below .500
for first time at M'

Michigan got the ball back 1:35 later
at its 32 and quickly pushed into
Gamecock territory. Ricks kept the,
drive alive by tightroping down the
right sideline for 11 yards on fourth-
and-six. After being sacked for a loss of
six, Wangler (who completed 17 of 30
passes on the day for 206 yards and only,
threw one interception) hit Mitchell for
21 markers, Carter for nine, and Carter

See more sports, Page 9

ced on it.
Carolina followed suit with its own
long offensive maneuver. After quar-
terback Garry Harper (who completed
nine of 15 for 118 yards) kept possession
of the ball with a successful fourth-
down sneak over center, Wolverine
safety Tony Jackson intercepted a
Harper pass at the Michigan 26-yard
line. But linebacker Andy Cannavino,
who tackled Rogers after the tailback
had faked through the line, was called
for interference, and Carolina had a fir-
st down at the Michigan 41.
Schembechler was enraged about the
costly penalty. "When a guy carries the
ball 36 times, you have every right to hit
him when he fakes through the line,"
the coach emphasized afterwards. "He
(the official) blew it."
Two Harper passes to Smith for 23
and 14 yards, respectively, took it down
to the nine-yard line, and Rogers
carried it the rest of the way in two
plays.
After Ingram rushed fpr nine yards in
three carries on the next} series, Don
Bracken dropped into punt formation.

But the snap went to Edwards, who ran
to the right side but was stopped well
short of the first down marker.
Schembechler blamed himself 'for
giving South Carolina the ball only 29
yards from paydirt. "Second-guessing
myself, it was a bad call," the dejected
coach admitted. "You're dealing with a
coach that doesn't have any confidence
in his defense, and that's wrong. Our
defense is not that bad, and I've got to
stop playing like we can't stop anybody.
"Our intent was not to run," he ex9
plained. "The intent was to run if they
gave us the run, and they did. We were
trying to run a safe play. However, we
couldn't hear the signals, and two
players at the point of attack didn't
hear them."
Rogers carried the pigskin for 17 of
the 29 yards, and Wright's score put the
Gamecocks in front for the first time.
The squads each traded punts, an*
then Wangler was intercepted by
Perlotte at the Wolverine 35. SC took it
to the five, but Harper gave Wangler
and the Wolverines another chance by
throwing an interception to linebacker
Robert Thompson in the end zone.
But the Maize and Blue came up just
short. Again.

again at the goal line for a three-yard
touchdown. Michigan headed for the
tunnel at halftime with a seemingly
comfortable 14-3 advantage. The
Wolverines took the second half kickoff
and marched at will against SC for
seven-and-a-half minutes, but on first
down from the Gamecock eight,
fullback Stanley Edwards fumbled, and
the pigskin rolled into the end zone,
where SC linebacker Walt Kater poun-

AP Photo
GAMECOCK CORNERBACK Chuck Finney deflects an end zone pass from
John Wangler to Anthony Carter (1) in the final five seconds of yesterday's
clash at Michigan Stadium. Carter hauled in two Wangler touchdown tosses,
but the Blue offense, beleaguered by fumbles at crucial times, could generate
no points after halftime as South Carolina held on to win, 17-14.

BIGGEST WIN IN YEARS FOR SOUTH CAROLINA:
'Cocks can crow louder now

By STAN BRADBURY
Respect. George Rogers has been receiving it for
two years, but until yesterday the South Carolina
team as a whole had lacked it.
The Gamecocks' 17-14 upset of the Wolverines in
Michigan Stadium may well be the most important
game in the 86-year history of the team in terms of
putting Carolina on the national football map. It has
given this team respect.
SOUTH CAROLINA -HAS beaten good teams
in recent years, teams like Georgia and
Clemson. But a win at Michigan represents the first
big win over a team outside the Southeast. It finally
gives the Gamecock program a feeling of national
prominence, something it has never had in a most
meiocre history.
In 86 years of South Carolina football, the
Gamecocks have gone undefeated only once (1907;
3-0) and the most wins they have ever claimed in one
season is eight (1903, 1979). The school's winning per-
centage since football began on the Columbia campus
is .501.
But times are changing at Carolina, and coach Jim
Carlen said he felt his team is a great one. "Nobody

has a better coaching staff than I have and nobody
has kids that try harder than mine," said Carlen. "I
thought we would win today, that's what I told my
players, and we did."
CARLEN HAD SPECIAL praise for Rogers, the
1979 All-American and current Heisman Trophy can-
didte. "He's the best football player in college foot-
ball today," Carlen said. "He had 142 yards and we
consider that to be a bad game for him. I thought that
he was better than Billy Sims was for Oklahoma last
year."
Carlen said that, in his opinion, the only better back
in the country today is Earl Campbell, only because
Campbell is shorter and stockier and thus doesn't
take as much punishment as does the 6-2, 220-pound
Rogers.
Rogers collected his 142 yards in 36 carries,
averaging only 3.9 per carry, but he played three
quarters of the game with a bruised thigh he contrac-
ted in the quarter.
ROGERS IS NOT only the greatest player in his
school's history, but the only really great player the
Gamecock gridders have ever laid claim to. A quick
look through the South Carolina record book reveals a

lack of tradition, the kind of tradition that schools like
Ohio State, Oklahoma, Southern Cal, Alabama and
Michigan have thrived on.
Does anybody really know who Tommy Suggs or
Jeff Grantz are? How about Steve Wadiak, Warren
Muir, and Fred Zeigler? Those five names highlight
Carolina's past, a past which includes only three bowl
games (Peach-1969, Tangerine-1975, Hall of Fame-
1979) all in the last 12 years and all three resulting in
losses.
The Gamecock football program has lacked
tradition. That's the most important reason why
Wolverine fans just couldn't believe what they were
seeing yesterday. Was it really South Carolina that
beat Michigan?
YES, AND IT was not luck. The Gamecocks have a
very good team, worthy of beating Michigan, and as
it proved before over 100,000 fans, capable of doing
the same.
What all those people witnessed was the evolution
of a recognized football organization. The
Gamecocks broke away from its past and into a
hopefully brighter future.
Welcome to the big time.

Alan Fonger
There s more to Blue woes
than just plain bad luck
Excuse me for asking, but is there a gridiron guru in the house?
If there is such a character hanging around these parts, I would like to
ask him (or her) just one question, if I may.
Oh, fair wizard, where hath the Michigan football team gone awry?
To phrase it more succinctly, what is wrong with this team?
The Wolverines have what many coaches consider to be the finest offen-
sive line in the country.
They have the nation's most explosive receiver in Anthony Carter, a pair
of agile tailbacks who can rip into any opponent's secondary, and a pair of
small, yet powerful fullbacks.w
John Wangler has proven he can pass with the finest quarterbacks.
Their defense, though it may be inexperienced, proved yesterday that it
could muffle the effectiveness of adangerous runner, holding South Carolina
tailback George Rogers to less than four yards per carry.
Yet as a team, Michigan has played only three quarters in 12 of solid
football-the final two against Notre Dame and the second stanza against
the Gamecocks.
One might argue that in both losing efforts, the Wolverines were victims
of circumstances. In South Bend, there was the questionable pass inter-
ference call on Notre Dame's final drive, the incorrect ruling that split end
Tony Hunter caught a key fourth-down pass in bounds, and Harry Oliver's
amazing 51-yard field goal. Yesterday it was the inability of two Michigan
linemen to hear signals on an unsuccessful fake punt that was cited as the
main reason South Carolina was able to assume possession far into
Wolverine territory and score the winning touchdown.
But you can only go so far in reducing the outcomes to "special" circum-
stances. Case in point: on three separate occasions, the Wolverines
penetrated inside the Carolina five-yard line, but came away empty-handed.
I guess that if you wanted to be persistent in your argument, you could con-
tend that Butch Woolfolk and Stan Edwards just happened to cough up the
pigskin at an inopportune time.
It seems that during crucial situations, such as third-down plays, one
component of the Wolverine football machine breaks down. Perhaps
Woolfolk and Edwards will fumble; maybe Norm Betts or Craig Dunaway will
let a pass slip out of his hands; a lineman might miss a blocking
assignment. Whatever the specific instances may be, these key miscues
have cropped up on the Wolverins like flies on a light bulb.
I cringe at Wangler's statement that "this team has character, we'll
come back." It would be nice to believe, but that's where the problem lies.
After three games, Michigan has no character, no identity as a football
team. After a second consecutive heartbreaking defeat, even Carter cannot
be considered the almighty savior-the Gamecocks proved it when they
surrounded him with cornerbacks, safeties, and linebackers on the final play
of the game.
Even Bo Schembechler readily admits that his squad is trapped in an
identity crisis.
"If you don't have any confidence in your defense, you can't mount an
attack and effectively play football. And I don't know whether we are
physically good enough to play power football," he said.
"I don't want to be a passing team," he continued. "I don't want to pass

Fumble-itis Final

M
First downs ...................
Rushing (attlyrd)........... 5
Passing (comp/att/int) ........ 17
Passing yrd ...................
Fumbles (no/lost) ...:.......
Punts (no/avg)................ 3.
SCORING
Michigan................. 0 1
South Carolina ............. 0
SCORING PLAYS
Se-Leopard, 26-yd. FG
M--Carter 9 pass from Wangler (H
M--Carter 3 pass from Wangler (H
SC-Rogers 2 run (Leopard kick)
SC-wright 1 run (Leopard kick)
RUSHING
MICHIGAN

IICH
24
0/172
/30/1
206
2/1
/49.3
14 0
3 7

SC
22
55/176
9/15/1,
118
3/1
' I/47

SOUTH CAROLINA
att comp
Harper .................... 15 9
Totals...................15 9
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN

int
1
1

yds
118
118

4,

1/9.. Carter .......................
Mitchell......................
0- 14 Betts ............................
7 17 Woolfolk....................
Ricks .................... .....
SOUTH CAROLINA

no.
8
4
3
I
1
A

Haji-Sheikh kick)
Haji-Sheikh kick)

att
Ricks......................... 17
Woolfolk .....................15
Edwards......................7
Ingram .......................5
Carter......................... 1
wangler ......................5
Totals.......................50
SOUTH CAROLINA
Rogers.... .................. 36
Wright........................12
Harper ......... ............. 4
Reeves ........................ 3
Totals ........................55
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att comp
WandIer................... 30 17
Totals ..................... 30 17

yd
87
66
32
17
0
-30
172
142
33
-3
176
int
1
1

avg
5.1
4.4
4.6
3.4'
0.0
-6.0
3.9
2.8
1.0
-1.0

Scott.......................... 4
Smith........................3
Gillespie ......................
Rogers.......................1
PUNTING
MICHIGAN
no.
Bracken.......................3
SOUTH CAROLINA
Norman........................4
FIELD GOALS
SOUTH CAROLINA'
att
Leopard ......................... 1
RETURNS
MICHIGAN

yds s
94
72
29
7
4
52
56
13
-3
avg lo
49.3 d
47.8
made lo
1

TD
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ
MICHIGAN SAFETY Jeff Cohen, sprawled on the turf, can only watch the
sad proceedings as George Rogers rumbles for part of his 142 yards. Rogers
is the main reason South Carolina's football program has begun to receive
the respect it commanded yesterday. Gamecock coach Jim Carlen calls
Rogers "the best college player in the nation."
NCAA SCORES

South Caroline 17, Michigan 14
Michigan St. 33, Western Michigan 7
Ong Central Michigan 21, Kent St. 6
ng Grand Valley St. 44 ,Michigan Tech 6
Wayne St. 23, Towson St. Md. 14
68 Saginaw Valley 24, Central St. 0. 19
Hillsdale 16, St. Norbert Wis. 7
Adsian 25, Geneva Pa. 14
Franklin Ind; 19, Hope 14
ng Wabash Ind. 43, Kalamazoo 7
26 Depauw Ind. 35, Albion 6
EAST
ept Colgate 38, Cornell 20 -
Harvard 14, Holy Cross 13
Massachusetts 39. Delaware St. 0
North Carolina 17, Maryland 3
Rutgers 44, Princeton 13
Syracuse 42, Northwestern 21
Yale 20, Connecticut 10
SOUTH
Alabama 41, Vanderbilt 0

Florida 21, Mississippi St.15
Georgia 34, Texas Christian 3
Georgia Tech 17, Memphis St. 8
Kentucky 21, Bowling Green 20
Miami (Fla.) 10, Florida St. 9
Tennessee 42, Auburn 0
MIDWEST
Illinois 20, Air Force 20
Iowa St. 10, Iowa 7
Kansas St. 31, Arkansas St. 10
Louisville 17, Kansas 9
Miami (Oh.) 42, Ball St. 9
Missouri 31, San Diego St. 7
Nebraska 21, Penn St. 7
WEST -
Arkansas 13, Tulsa 10
Indiana 49, Colorado 7
Montana St. 18, Boise St. 17
Ohio St. 38, Arizona St. 21
Stanford 31, Oklahoma 14
UCLA 35, Wisconsins0
Southern Cal 24. Minnesota 7

Punts Kickoffs
No/Yds No/Yds
Carter ...............1/26
Thompson ..........
SOUTH CAROLINA

Int'ce
No/Yd
1/0
1/4

Thomas .............1/11
yds Bishop............
206 Smith............
206 Perlotte...........

1/24
I/0

Cifford lad Idana t 97rout
By The Associated Press oo -.A - min the hird niar- deficit. Qr ntL £"I 9A

BOULDER, Colo.-Senior quarter-
back Tim Clifford threw five touchdown
passes, including three to flanker Nate
Lundy, as Indiana blitzed Colorado 49-7
yesterday in a record-setting college
football game.
The victory enabled the Hoosiers to
snap an eight-game losing streak to Big
Eight teams and boosted their season
record to 2-1. Colorado dropped to 0-3.
CLIFFORD, WHO LEFT the game
after three quarters, completed 11 of 14
passes for 345 yards. The 11 com-
pletions enabled him to eclipse the In-
diana career record of 259 and the yar-
dage tied theschool'sssingle-game
mark. The five TD passes were the
most ever by a quarterback against a
Colorado team.
Lundy, whose scoring passes covered
75, 74 and 43 yards, caught five passes
in all for 256 yards, the highest single
game yardage figure in Indiana
history. And tailback Mike Harkrader.

Hawminsits-yarn run i n e innqu 1 A
ter.
Ohio State 38,
Arizona State 21
COLUMBUS, Ohio-Quarterback Art
Schlichter set a school record with
three touchdown passes yesterday,
propelling second-ranked Ohio State (3-
0) to a 38-21 romp over Arizona State (2-
1) in a matchup of college football un-
bea tens.
SCHLICHTER ACCOUNTED for 310
total yards. He completed 14 of 19
passes for 271 yards and ran 15 times
for 39 additional yards.

Ted Sundquist put Air Force back in
the game with a 63-yard touchdown run
in the third quarter, and teammate
Charlie Heath put the Falcons ahead
with a one-yard plunge in the fourth
quarter.
ILLINOIS' LAST REAL chance to
win the game fizzled with an incom-
plete pass in the ebd zone, and Bass
came in to tie the game with his second
field goal of the day.
Iowa State 10, Iowa 7
IOWA CITY, Iowa-John Quinn
threw a touchdown pass to Jim Knuth

,tuioiern Ua t4,
Minnesota 7
MINNEAPOLIS-Marcus Allen
rushed for 216 yards and two fourth
quarter touchdowns and Gordon Adams
passed 29 yards to Kevin Williams as
No. 5-ranked Southern Cal (3-0) turned
back stubborn Minnesota 24-7 yesterday.
Minnesota (1-2) had cut a 10-0 lead to
10-7 on Marion Barber's 16-yard TD run
midway through the fourth quarter. But
Allen, the latest in a long line of great
USC tailbacks, raced 20 yards for ai
touchdown with just 3:30 remaining. Heu
also scored on a 37-yard jaunt with 1:02
left to silence the near capacity crowd
of 56,115 at Memorial Stadium.
Syracuse 42,
Northwestern 21
SYRACUSE, N.Y.-Joe Morris ran
for 172 yards and quarterbck Dave
Warner eanred threet uihdowns a

Big Ten Roundup

Mike Pagel, Arizona State's quarter-
bck, threw for two touchdowns, and

and Alex Giffords kicked a 49-yard field
goal for the winning points to lift un-
t-e o T., - - 4 t - . . i. ,._. ..

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan