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September 24, 1980 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-24

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SPORTS
Wednesday, September 24, 1980

Page 8

The Michigan Daily

Butch bleeds blu
By ALAN FANGER

[)

Wokcontentto place team's

For the love of Michigan ...
Lawrence Ricks is running at a torrid pace and is
pushing Butch Woolfolk for the starting tailback spot
in the Wolverines offense, but Woolfolk says that "as
long as he's doing good, it doesn't bother me."
FOR THE LOVE of Michigan...
Woolfolk doesn't sleep in a bed when his team
travels to road games. The soft, ultra-contoured mat-
tresses that are commonplace in hotel rooms tend to
rebel against his tender back. Woolfolk says that one
night of repose on the floor per week doesn't bother
him.
For the love of Michigan ...
WOOLFOLK IS THE defending Big Ten outdoor
track champion at 300 meters. His commitment to
running track last spring forced him out of spring
practice, much to the chagrin of Bo Schembechler.
He now says he is inclined to end his career on the
cinder and concentrate solely on football. That
doesn't bother him, either.
For the love of Michigan...
Woolfolks believes he possesses the same size and
speed that characterized Charles White and Billy
Sims during their collegiate careers. Unfortunately
for Woolfolk, the Michigan offense "doesn't try and
make superstars out of everyone." While White alid
Sims carried the ball between 25 and 30 times a game
in college, Woolfolk carries the ball 15 to 20 times on a
good day. But that statistic doesn't bother him.
BUTCH WOOLFOLK has placed Butch Woolfolk
second on the Michigan football priority list. No big
deal, he says. It's always been that way, whether he's
played four or 40 minutes of any game. Michigan has

been first in his mind, and will continue to be first,
as, long as he puts on that maize and blue uniform
every Saturday.
Woolfolk does not radiate enthusiasm when he
speaks. His calm, reserved manner reminds one of
the melancholy ministrel who often apperaed in
Shakespearan comedies. But the Westfield, N.J.
junior feels the first two weeks of the 1980 season con-
tained little, if any, comedic value.
He said he still feels "somewhat" responsible for
Saturday's heartbreaking 29-27 loss to Notre Dame.
In that game, Woolfolk fumbled the ball after taking
a pitchout with 7:35 to play in the game and the
Wolverines leading, 21-20. Irish defensive back Dave
Duerson pounced on the ball, setting up the touch-
down that vaulted Notre Dame back into the lead, 26-
21.
"FOR A WHILE, I thought it (the loss) was my
fault. I was running for my life the next time I got the
ball," he said.
"I think I was on the way down (when the fumble
occurred)," Woolfolk recalled. "I had just taken one
arm off the ball. Then the guy (linebacker Bob
Crable) hit his helmet right on the spot."
That mistake, along with the improvement shown
by Ricks, have helped to make the tailback position a
competitive one on the Wolverine squad.
'I CAN'T COMPLAIN about not playing," said
Woolfolk, in reference to the fact that Ricks, despite
his status as a second-string player, has seen more
playing time than his first-team counterpart. "Larry
Ricks is good-the guy is very talented."
Woolfolk said he knew that when he came to

performance
Michigan. that he wouldn't be taking a glory trip. He
knew that Schembechler's grind-it-out philosophy dif-
fered from his concept of a wide-open, free-wheeling
attack.
"We're not using the option as much," he said with
a twitch of disappointment. "The defenses started
knowing exactly what we were doing on options. Back
in the days of Rob Lytle, we could do that type of
thing. Now we're trying to adjust and do some dif-
ferent things, like call audibles."
FOR WOOLFOLK, WHO only two years ago was
heralded by Michigan fans as a freshman breakaway
threat, the scenario has not always been bright. But
that particular scenario is a personal one, he says,
adding that the outlook for the team is just peachy.
"Notre Dame was a non-conference game, so we're
really not worried about the Big Ten championship.
We're not as down as you think. Sure, we suffered a
tough loss, but we're ready for South Carolina.
"I love Michigan," he asserts, after being asked if
he regrets his decision to play here. "It may not be
totally suited for me and my style of running the
ball, but that's okay ... I love it here."
"YES, I'VE HAD a few (disappointments), but I'm
not concerned with that."
As long as he has a floor to sleep on, a few holes in
which to burst through, and some victory-conscious
comrades with whom he can play football, Woolfolk
will continue to wear his armor and cushion himself
against any further disappointments that may crop
up over his final two seasons here.
The work will get done .'.. for the love of Michigan.

ahead of his own

;:

Butch Woo folk

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By JEFF QUICKSILVER
Protests and appeals are not uncom-
mon in the world of sports today and
here at the University, the intramural
and recreational sports department has
developed its own policy for handling
protests filed from competing teams.
"The basis of our policy rests on the
contention that no appeal can be made
on a judgment call by the official, such
as calling a runner out or safe. Teams
may only appeal rule interpretation or
questions of eligibility," said Moby
Benedict, chairman of the Protest Board
and director of officials.
Benedict, a former Michigan
baseball coach, added that the team
must stop play immediately and direct
their appeal to the official before the
next live ball is played. The opposing
team and field supervisor would then
both be notified that the game was
being played under protest.
Finally, Benedict said that a ten
dollar processing fee is required for the
appeal to be considered, and that both

the fee and the team's written statemnt
must be filed to the Protest Board by
the next working day.
"People are usually very hot tem-
pered at the time of the protest, but by
the next day they have had a chance to
cool off and often decide that their
protest is not worth the trouble of the
fee and written statement," said
Benedict.
Earl Edwards, Director of the In-
tramural program, added that any
break in the protest procedure, such as
waiting till the game had ended before
deciding to appeal a rule interpretation
that had occurred earlier, would result
in the rejection of the protest.
If however, the protest and fee are
filed in time and all procedural grounds
are followed then the appeal is guaran-
teed fair donsideration by the Protest
Board. Benedict said that after taking
statements from the official of the
game, the field supervisor, and the
team's manager, he then presents the
information to the two other members

rn prote
of the Board. After considering all the
statements and reviewing the official
interpretation of the rule there is then a
vote to uphold or deny the protest.
"If the appeal is upheld the game will
usually be played again from the point
where the protest was lodged, and the
team's ten dollar fee is refunded.
However, if the appeal is denied the fee
is kept and placed in the Recreation
Sports General Fund," said Edwards.
If the team is unhappy with the decision
by the Board they can appeal the ruling

i policy
to Edwards, whose decision becomes
final.
Unlike rule interpretation, questions
of eligibility are not considered by the
Protest Board. Instead of team's roster
is immediately checked in the in-
tramural ;office and eligibility is
quickly determined. Benedict and Ed-
wards both emphasized that the
eligibility rule had no intention of
keeping students from playing in the in-
tramural program, but only to main-
tain some sense of organization.

0I

*mmmminmmminm m-- ------

YOUR FIRST
CROSS COUNTRY
LESSON COURTESY
OF ROSSIGNOLO
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MAKE SKIS THAT ARE EASY TO
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At Ros'signol wA e make uur re( reational skis
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GRIDDE
PICKS*
This week is another chance for
somebody to win a free one-item pizza
from Pizza Bob's. It's easy, just pick
the winners in the games below and the
score of the Michigan game. Last
week's winner was Dan Meyers who
picked a dazzling 19 out of 20 correctly.
You could be next so get your picks into
the Daily by Midnight Friday.
1. South Carolina at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. Arizona St. at Ohio St.
3. Western Michigan at Michigan St.
4. Minnesota at Southern Cal.
5. Indiana at Colorado
6. Air Force at Illinois
7. Wisconsin at UCLA
8. Northwestern at Syracuse
9. Iowa St. at Iowa
10. Eastern Michigan at Toledo
11. Kent St. at Central Michigan
12. Stanford at Oklahoma
13. Nebraska at Penn St.
14. Arizona at California
15. Tulane at Mississippi
16. Tennessee at Auburn
17. Marylan at North Carolina
18. Temple at Pittsburgh
19. Slippery Rock at California (pa.)
20. DAILY LIBELS at Whatsamatta U.

Coiing up.,
Beginning this Friday, September 26;
and continuing each Friday thereafter;
you'll be able to submit letters to our
Fan-Fare column. But first, a few
ground rules. (1) letters should not ex-
ceed 250 words in length, (2) print your
name, address and phone number at
the bottom (in case we need to contact
you), and (3) address your letters to the
Michigan Daily-Sports, 420 Maynard,
Ann Arbor, )I 48109. We hope to hear
from YOU soon.
BILLBOARD
The Michigan Ticket Department has
announced that student season tickets
for Wolverine hockey games will go on
sale today, at the ticket office at State
and Hoover. Tickets for the 19-home
game season cost $30. The Icers open
their home season October 18 against
Bowling Green.
Alto there will be a meeting for any
male interested in trying out for the
Michigan men's tennis team tomorrow
at 3:00 p.m. downstairs in the large
classroom in the Athletic Ad-
ministration Building, at Hoover and
State streets. Please bring class
schedules and if you are unable to at-
tend, call Coach Brian Eisner at
663,2411, and leave your name and
number.

OUR SIDECUT CAN BE THE
TURNING POINT IN YOUR SKIING.
Al Rosigfnol rer ratiOnal skis hiae/
a dletinite side(ut.
When a slki \Aithi a wide uIt is
mif )\tU ( )R\ard, Iput 01n edge and
'A lI htd it tuirns. naturaNl. Note
ho\ the skier in the photo has
edged and A (ighted his doi nhill

p.--

r1

ski in ord er to turn to the right.

-.

~ 1
/f
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w

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KICK AND GLIDE. OUR SKIS ARE
DESIGNED TO MAKE BOTH
EASIER. HERE'S HOW.
Our skis make kick and glidIe easier
bec aue% n e'e designed them to be in
(onta t thi the s niN) ah. their entire
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S" ()u' l g210't (\<( ellent tra( tin up1t) hills
and n tlat terrain, n ith bo)Mth ur 'vav-
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step cat the vxa\.

. J _

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REMEMBER THE MORE YOU KNOW ABOUT CROSS
COUNTRY, THE MORE LIKELY YOU'LL ENJOY CROSS
COUNTRY WHEN YOU GO.
So ask your Rossignol dealer for our free
brochure. If your dealer is out of bro-
chures send to: Rossignol Cross Coun-
try Brochure Industrial Avenue, Willis-

GET YOUR CAREER OFF
TO A FLYING START
It takes four years to get a college degree. How long will it
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If you haven't settled on a company or corporation yet, why
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