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September 23, 1980 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-23

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 23, 1980- Page 5
the ann arbor film cooperative

210

PRESENTS

po*
P*

COMING HOME

Starring JANE FONDA and JON VOIGHT
7:00 & 9:15-Aud. A
Admission. $2
PUBLIC AUCTION
of
ORIENTAL RUGS
All to be sold for unpaid accounts to our overseas
creditors through First National Bank of Boston;
Ref. No. 323-74544
AUCTION AT:
Holiday Inn/West Bank
2900 Jackson Rd., 1-94 Exit 172 Ann Arbor
Thursday, September 25, 1980
Viewing 7pm Auction 8pm
Our collection includes Kerman, Kashan, Afghan, Princess
Bokhere, silk, Qum, Ardebit, Afshari and many other rugs in.
all sizes and varieties from Pakistan, India, China and Romania.
Sponsor: Oriental Rug Palace of Massachusetts
Auctioneer: A. Adam TERMS: CASH OR CHECK

. THE NUCLEAR WARHEAD that wa
Titan II missile on Friday depart

AP Photo
is believed to have been blown out of a Damascus. Ark. An Air Force flat bed truck carried it from the site yester-
ts from the site of the explosion in" day.
AIR FORCE WON'T ANS WER Q UES TIONS

Warhead allegedly transported

.W From AP and UPI
DAMASCUS, Ark.-As two helicopters hovered
overhead, a nuclear warhead apparently contained in
one of two canisters labeled "Do Not Drop" was
loaded onto a flatbed truck yesterday and removed
from a devastated Titan II missile silo site to Little
Rock Air Force Base.
As usual, the . Air Force refused even to
acknowledge that a nuclear warhead had been in-
volved in the fuel explosion at the silo Friday.
BUT AN OFFICIAL of the government's Pantex
nuclear weapons assembly plant near Amarillo,
gexas, said the warhead would be taken to the plant.
Paul Wagner, the ranking Department of Energy
official at Pantex, said, "I have been told . . the
damaged warhead from the Titan missile accident
will be sent to Pantex for disassembly or analysis. I
do not have any other specifics regarding when."
Since the late 1960s, nuclear material from past

military accidents has been stored at Pantex, the
final assembly point for all the nation's nuclear
weapons.
PENTAGON SOURCES SAID the weapon suffered
only a slight dent and there was no low-level radiation
leakage from the fiery explosion of leaking fuel
Friday that killed one airman and injured 21 others.
Two large canisters-one blue, the other silver and
green and each labeled "Do Not Drop"-were an-
chored by chains to the bed of a flatbed tractor-trailer
in the convoy of eight military vehicles. Two helicop-
ters accompanied the procession.
State police and local law enforcement officers also
followed the convoy on the 90-minute trip south on
U.S. 65 and Interstate 40 to the base near Jackson-
ville, about 12 miles northeast of Little Rock.
IT HAS BEEN a long-standing Air Force policy to
neither confirm nor deny the existence of nuclear
warheads at the silos. The Air Force also refused to

confirm numerous reports that the warhead was
blown hundreds of feet from the launch hole when the
silo blew up about 3 a.m. Friday,
However, a few hours after the convoy got to the
base, the Air Force said that reporters. would be
allowed within several hundred feet of the crater that
was blown into the silo when it erupted.
The blast, which killed a sergeant and injured 21
other men, occurred about eight-and-one-half hours
after a wrench socket was dropped by a workman in
the silo and hit the rocket's first stage, starting a fuel
leak.
Despite Air Force secrecy, a colonel directing the
convoy smiled and gave a thumbs-up sign to an AP
reporter who asked, "Is that what you wouldn't con-
firm or deny?"
An Air Force pickup truck and a security van with
flashing blue lights led the convoy. The helicopters
flew ahead to report traffic conditions.

Jocal experts react to presidential debate

By KEVIN TOTTIS
Although University experts had
milfed 'reactions -to Sunday night's
presidential debates between
Republican Ronald Reagan and In-
dependent John Anderson, they did
agree-there was no winner.
In fact, the debate was not a
debate-or at least not a formal
debate-according to Communications
Prof. William Colburn, who teaches
courses in argumentative speaking.
Colburn explained the forum allowed no
interplay between the two can-
didates and did not permit the six jour-
nalists to respond to the candidates' an-
swers.
"I THINK THE reporters should
have been able to question the can-

didates," he said. Because of the for-
mat, Colburn added, no "winner" or
"loser" could be chosen.
In evaluating the candidates' plat-
form conduct, Colburn said, both did
fairly well.
"Reagan was cool, calm, not troubled
or tense, this was helpful to him,".
Colburn said. "John Anderson,
however, was a little aggressive-but
that's his style," the communications
professor added.
POLITICAL SCIENCE PROF. Ar-
thur Miller said he felt the two can-
didates' speaking abilities were not as
good as they could have been. Miller
said Anderson was nervous and "he
was a bit too hyper-he was not really
in command at times. The independent
candidate may have put some people

off with his actions, Miller explained.
Miller said Reagan's performance
surprised him because "he (Reagan)
didnt use the questions to his full advan-
tages" and his answers weren't broad
enough.
Miller said he was annoyed by the
commentators' pleas for s ecificity.
"There is no reason a journalst should
feel they have to remind a candidate
how to answer," he said, adding it's a
credit to the candidates "they didn't get
upset by them (the journalists)."
MILLER SAID HE was impressed by
the candidates handling of President
Carter's absence from the debate.
"They could have been so much more
critical," he said. "They bent over
backwards to be careful and not attack
him too much."

Political Science Prof. John Kingdon
shared Miller's surprise. "I thought
they'd be ganging up on Car-
ter-besides occasional reference to his
not being there, they didn't."
Political Science Prof. George'
Grassmuck said it was important for
the candidates not to criticize Carter
too much. He said the American public
will not readily accept criticism of the
president. "It is always dangerous for
those who criticize the president."
GRASSMUCK ALSO SAID the
debates could prove helpful to Ander-
son. "It did establish Anderson as a
candidate," he said. By Anderson ap-
pearing with Reagan, the "importance
of image" was stressed and the "im-
portance of party" was downplayed, he
said.
Grassmuck said he helped arrange
the debates between John Kennedy and
Richard Nixon i 1960 and has noticed
improvement since that time-both
technically and in the debates' format.
He said the Sunday debates were
structured better and ran more
smoothly. In contrast with the Carter-
Gerald Ford debates of 1976,
Grassmuck said they answered the
questions "somewhat more directly."
375 N. MAPLE 769-1300

'Students say Anderson bested

Reagan in
ontinued from Page 1
moaned while others performed violin
motions.
THE CONSENSUS OF the Markley
residents was that Anderson won.
0 "Anderson did much better. After his
first response, Anderson was more
defined in his answers," said Anderson
supporter Christa Lane, an LSA senior.
But some students were not im-
pressed by either candidate. "The
debate sounded rehearsed. They never
completely refuted one another," said
LSA freshman Vic Corondon.
VERY FEW RESIDENTS in South
Quad took note of the forum. Only one
*lounge was filled with residents wat-
ching the debate. A check down several
halls found many room sets tuned to
Midnight Express.
In South Quad's Kelsey House lounge,
viewers remarked on Carter's con-
spicuous absence.
"Carter is really losing his ass in
this," resident Paul Spitz said.
"I thought Reagan won because his
policies were more clear and specific.
Anderson spoke in much more general
terms," said Lisa Kaufman, a resident
of South Quad's Bush House.
"I thought Anderson won because he
looks at things on a global scale,"
commented Gil Wilshire. He added
"Anderson is willing to make unpopular
decisions and statements," a quality
which he felt was a favorable one.
"I THOUGHT ANDERSON was hot-
headed and sanctimonious," remarked
Kent Frederick, another Kelsey House

presidentia
policies and plans and those of
Reagan's," explained Smith, 23, a1
commercial artist.
THE DIRECTOR OF Anderson's
Washtenaw County campaign, George
Golubovskis, 20, said, "Reagan came
across as an actor, reciting the same
old formula and the same old
demagoguery. Reagan cannot provide
a real alternative to Carter."
"That is why Reagan cannot appeal
to the young professional, the vanguard

debate
of this country. Anderson will win
because he doesn't use everyday
rhetoric," Golubovskis concluded.
The group in the apartment burst out
laughing when Reagan said a "divine
force" had placed the U.S. between the
two greatest oceans on earth.
"Nobody is going to believe Reagan's
rhetoric. That's why he's going to lose
this election," said School of
Engineering graduate Lisa Anneberg.

TIS WEEK AT
PIZZA
TUE!
JAM S
live muss
WEDN
BOAT
THUl
PITCHE

th
IDfIY
NIGHT
SDAY
ESSION
Ic, no cover
ESDAI
NIGHT
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out
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