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September 18, 1980 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-18

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 18, 1980-Page 9

U.N. seeks food

for

Africa

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1980 at 3 P.M.
RUDOLF STEINER HOUSE, 1923 Goddes, Ann Arbor
A PUBLIC LECTURE ON
"Rhythms In Human Biography"
By Prof. Werner Glas
Director Of The Waldoarf Institute
Of Mercy College, Southfield
Sponsored By The Rudolf Seiner Institute
Of The Great Lakes Area
The Public Is Invited Donation $3 (Students $1.50)

ROME (AP)-More than 150 million Africans face
the specter of famine worse than what was suffered
in the 1973-74 drought unless wealthy countries send
massive emergency shipments of cereal by the end of
the year, United Nations officials report.
In an attempt to stem the starvation gripping 25
African nations, the U.N. Food and Agriculture
Organization will convene a special meeting
tomorrow to launch an urgent drive aimed at
securing enough wheat, rice, and maize to feed them.
"If we do not help they will die quietly, slowly,"
FAO Director-General Edouard Saouma told repor-
ters. Drought and the "man-made disasters" of civil
strife have caused the critical food shortages, he
said.
SAOUMA IS seeking 550,000 tons of cereal to be
shipped quickly to Somalia and Ethiopia-which
shelter a total of more than one million refugees-and
to eight nations of the Sahel area, south of the Sahara.
During the 1973-74 drought in the Sahel, tens of
thousands of people died, along with 3.5 million head
of cattle.

"We hope that the emergency will be over by mid-
1981, but we are not very optimistic," Saouma said.
Saouma said he expects the United States to lead
the way in pledging about 25 per cent of the $125
million FAO is seeking from 35 countries invited to
tomorrow's meeting. Many countries, including some
major oil producers, have not answered the invitation
to the emergency conference.
EMERGENCY HELP is being sought for food-
short areas- stretching from Djibouti in Africa's
eastern "Horn," to Lesotho in the far south, to the
Cape Verde Islands off west Africa. But about half of
the emergency help would go to Ethiopia and
Somalia, two hostile neighbors whose conflict has
displaced hundreds of thousands of people.
The Rev. Salvatore Colombo, bishop of the Somali
capital of Mogadishu, told a reporter that 60 per cent
of, those in Somalia's 26 refugee camps are children.
Many have been injured in the fighting, he said.
Zimbabwe, formerly called Rhodesia, comes next
on the list. It has 660,000 refugees or people just
returning to the country after years as refugees from

the Rhodesian guerrilla war. Sudan has 400,000
refugees and poor crop prospects.
THE UGANDAN province of Karamoja-where
U.N. officials say hungry men often snatch food from
children and old women-is another target for food
distribution.
Uganda suffers from the same kind of civil strife
that has made other countries, such as Chad, near-
impossible destinations for grain deliveries. Ship-
ments are often pillaged, stolen, or left to rot while
awaiting transport on potholed tracks.
Saouma estimates 2.4 million tons of cereal will be
needed for the year 1980-81, but the amount of aid this
year was only 1.3 million tons, fallin far short of
FAO goals.
In a speech prepared for delivery tomorrow, the
FAO chief says: "The present crisis must be regar-
ded as unique and not as the start of a new cycle of
emergencies.
"Political events and aberrations of nature may be
uncontrollable, but the basic problems of African
agriculture can be solved and must be solved."

Welcome Studentsl.
The University Activities Center cordially
invites you to a wine and cheese open house
introducing the NEW STUDENT LOUNGE
AND STA FF OF THE Michigan Union.

Reagan
From AP and UPI
Ronald Reagan called on President
Carter yesterday to change his mind
and join Sunday's debate with himself
and John Anderson.
'There is still time for him to reverse
his decision not to debate and to par-
ticipate in discussing publicly the great
issues facing America and the world,"
ithe GOP candidate said at a news con-
ference at Dulles International Airport
in suburban Virginia.
AND AT ONE point on his Texas trip
Tuesday, Reagan said the unoccupied
seat in Baltimore. Will not truly be em-
pty, but "will be filled with the unkept
promises of Jimmy Carter."
The League of Women Voters recon-
sidered yesterday, however, and will
not place the empty chair on the stage
as it had planned.
"we do not intend to let the 'empty
chair' controversy overshadow the op-
portunity of the American people to
focus on the candidate's discussion of
the issues," said Ruth Hinerfeld, chair-
person of the league's Education Fund.
SHE, SAID THE league's attorneys
also had warned of "legal questions."
On several occasions during his cam-
paign trip to Texas this week, Reagan
responded to Carter attacks by saying
the president should be willing to
debate those issues if he feels strongly
about them.
"I just doh't know how much farther
he'll go," he said in Harlingen, "to try
and divert attention from the fact that
he can say all these things to a nation-
wide audience."
"IT LOOKS LIKE he prefers the Oval
Office and the Rose Garden to a debate,
and with his record, I'm not sure I can
blame him," Reagan said in Corpus
Christi.
Meanwhile, the president's forces
continued their assault on Reagan's
civil rights record yesterday, calling on
the GOP candidate to support a major
fair housing bill and chiding him for
what they said was his opposition to
similar legislation in California.
White House press secretary Jody
Powell said that in light of Reagan's
statement that he would like to see civil
rights laws strengthened, "We call
upon him to state his position on, and to
support, the fair housing bill which is
now in the Senate."
"THE GOVERNOR'S POSITION is
also -relevant in light of his record as
governor of California, which shows he
advocated repeal of the California fair
housing law, known as the Rumford
Act," Powell said.

urges Carter

to debate

Hope to sae you
on September 18
4:30-6:00

The Carter camp focused attention on
Reagan's record in the battle between
the two major parties for black support
in the pivotal South, Carter's native
territory.
Standing before a black audience at
the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in
Atlanta, Carter noted Reagan cam-
paign references to "states' rights" and
the Ku Klux Klan, and said: "Hatred
has no place in this country. Racism
has no place in this country."
AN INCENSED BUSH railed against
Carter in a speech yesterday to the Ohio

Association of Realtors in Cleveland.
He said the president's statement
"was mean, it was small, it was ugly,
and I don't think the American people
are going to cater to this kind of cam-
paign."
"To anyone who watched and listened
to Mr. Carter's inflammatory, divisive
remarks in Atlanta, his intent was un-
mistakeable," Bush said, adding:
"Yesterday, in what has got to be a
new low by a man who holds the highest
office in the land, Mr. Carter made the
suggestion in Atlanta that Governor

Reagan is a racist," he said.
Reagan said when he discussed
states' rights in Mississippi, he was ex-
pressing his longstanding belief "that
we've gone a long way toward eroding
our federal system of sovereign
states."

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GOLI
GOLD JEWELRY ON SILVE
REGARDLESS OF CO ntDO
sting in any uwne
10K or 14K Ch
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0 raeets * EarringsI 1K

FINERS
METALS
unwante'd
D and,
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ass Rings-..
or 14K. Bring a high return because of
weight. They can easily bring you up to
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ding Bands OK-14K-18K are
le. They can be worth up to $150.00 each.j

FREE GOLD TESTING
If you have unstamped merchandise and are uncertain
whether or not it is Karat gold, we will test it free of charge.
If the test is positive, we will make an immediate offer.
PREMIUM PRICES
PAID FOR
"BALFOUR," "JOSTEN," "ARTCARVED"
BRAND NAME RINGS
SPECIAL PRICES PAID
For
"Sterling Silver" such as, "International,"
"Towle," "Rogers," and "Gorham,"
ALSO BUYING.
old pocket watches
also collector coins
BUYING SILVER U.S. COINS
1964 and Before
Dimes.. $1.20 to $1.60
Quarers 3.00to $.00Silver Dollars . .. $15 and
Halvers $3.00 to $4.00 up depending on condition
"-s . $6.00,.to$8.06
(Prices Depend Upon Market Fluctuations)
ALL PRICES ARE COMPUTED BY TROY WEIGHT. PRICES IN AD ARE INDICA-
TIONS ONLY-SPECIFIC ITEMS MAY BE HIGHER OR LOWER, DEPENDING ON
PRECISE WEIGHT AND CONTENT. PRICES FLUCTUATE ACCORDING TO DAILY
MARKET CONDITIONS.

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" Necklace"
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L B ,c ryesthe!

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1. Sterling silver spoons and forks up to
$35.90 each.
2. Silver bowls, trays and service pieces
quickly add up to hundreds of dollars.
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MOST WANTED
ITEMS THIS WEEK:
Check Out All New Prices!
3. Silver coins-1964 and before; silver dollars
1935 and before.
4. Franklin and Danbury mint items plus dental
gold.
5. 10-K and 14-K class rings, up to $150 each.
6. 10-K and 14-K and 18-K wedding
bands up to $150 each.

5 DAYS ONLY!

Fri.
Sept. 19
11 am-6 pm

Sat.
Sept. 20

.Sun. Mon.
Sept. 21 Sept. 22
11 am-4 pm 11 am-6 pm

Tues.
Sept. 23
11 am-6 pm

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