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September 18, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-18

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 18, 1980-Page 3-.,

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'Legal aid
bucket drive
Snts$.2,200

By PAM KRAMER
It ranks behind accidents and heart attacks, but domestic
violence-persons initiating physical violence against their
spouses or sexual partners-causes a great deal of injury and
human suffering. Nearly 50 volunteers, money buckets in
hand, were trying to do something about it Tuesday.
The volunteers stationed at the Engineering Arch, the
Michigan Union, and Kresge's raised almost $2,200 that will
go to the Domestic Violence Legal Assistance Project to help
cover the court costs of low income battered women.
THE LEAGAL ASSISTANCE Project is a division of
Feminist Legal Services, a service of the University Law

School.
"Some of the women have been getting beaten for a long
time, and for others it's a new problem," says Molly Reno, a
supervisory attorney for the project.
"The Assault Crisis Center of SAFE (Shelter Available
For Emergency) House refers them to us," she said.
The Assault Crisis Center, located on Main Street, offers
information and aid to battered women. SAFE House
provides housing to battered women who have recently left
their homes.
"We're very pleased with the bucket drive," said volun-
teer Carole McCabe.

POETRY READING
With
E. Bobbe Atkins
and
Mark Prejsnar
Reading from their works
Thurs., Sept. 18
7:30 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE

NOON LUNCHEON
Soup & Sandwich 754
Elizabeth Schwartz, Attorney:
"Ethics in Law
Enforcement"
Friday, Sept. 19 Noon
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
(662-5189)

Alternative phone service
ecuts long distance costs

..... isi: i:":::::.::::::::::::::::: :::::.::::::::::"::::::::::::.:.._:._::;:..:;.::,:::.;":..::>::...;...:;.

i

OUR APOLOGIES

By JOYCE FRIEDEN
Lately, radio audiences in the greater
Detroit area have been hearing adver-
tisements for a new phone service. "Cut
your long distance phone charges
anywhere from 30 to 50 per cent," the
announcer's voice purrs. "Stop
blaming yourself for talking too much
and start blaming Ma Bell for charging
too much."t
SThe had is part of a campaign to in-
troduce residential customers to
Microwave Communications, Inc., a
communications company that now of-
fers long-distance phone service to and
from 70 metropolitan areas across the
United States, including the Detroit
area. .
FOR A SMALL monthly fee, Bell
customers can get their calls put
through by MCI and save what MCI of-
ficials claim is a substantial amount on
!he long distance charges.
"If a customer is now, making at least
$25 per month in long distance calls, he
could save from 30 to 50 per cent on his
"long distance bill by using our service,"
:explained MCI Public Relations
Manager Andrij Bilyk.
Although Bell Telephone employs
;some microwave equipment in tran-
'smitting long distance calls, MCI's
microwave operations are more up to
date, according to Dan Dennis, MCI
'opeations director for the company's
;Southfield office. "All our equipment is
.the new state of the art, and is more
-productive," Dennis said. "Also, we,
;iemploy fewer people and have a more
*efficienit operation. That's why our ser-
,vice is so affordable."
To get the service, subscribers must
'first convert all their phones from
regular dial to Touch-Tone. Once the
proper equipment is installed, using
'MCI to make the call requires nothing
more than dialing 22 digits.

THE RELATIONSHIP between MCI
and Bell's parent company, American
Telephone and Telegraph (through
which MCI must contract for local ser-
vice) has been tense. "AT&T tried to
put us out of business," Dennis said. A
1971 decision by the Federal Com-
munications Commission allowed for
the entrance of competition in the
telecommunications market. However,
Dennis said, AT&T still made it difficult
for MCI to operate, so MCI sued AT&T
for refusing to give the corporation
local service.
"We were awarded $1.8 billion.
That's the largest anti-trust settlement
in history," Dennis said, adding that
AT&T is currently appealing that
decision.
Although MCI has existed since 1963,
it did not begin offering service until
1972, and then only to businesses. Ac-
cording to Bilyk, MCI started serving
the Chicago and St. Louis areas, but by
1978 it had service to 20 metropolitan
areas.
SINCE MCI started offering service
to residential customers in March,
Bilyk said, the response has been
"tremendous. In Houston, our largest
market, we drew 21,000 phone calls and
5,000 sales in our first two weeks of ad-
vertising," he said.
Dennis said his office has been
receiving approximately 100 calls per
day since the radio blitz ;started.
Employees in the Ann Arbor office of
Michigan Bell said they "knew nothing
abut.the service" when they were con-
tacted by' telephone last Friday. But
Len Singer, Michigan Bell's News
Relations Representative, said, "We at
the Bell System recognike that com-
petition in the telephone business is a
way of life and we stand fully ready to
compete. We intend to continue to give
good service to all our customers."

TO

ALL

HIGHLA

D 1

Nd

PLOYN-ES.

We've decided to celebrate
our 47th Anniversary with
one of the biggest sales our
customers have ever seen. To wit,
we've cut every price in every
Highland store.Of course, this means
our stores will be busy with
customers for the last 3 days.
Sorry about that.
LAST THREE SALE DAYS - THURS., FRI. & SAT. - 10 to 9

-HAPPENINGS
FILMS
Audio-Visual Services-Anyplace But Here, 12:05 p.m., School of Public
Heaalth II Aud.
AAFC-Giant, 6,9:30 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
AAFC-The Phantom Chariot, 7, 9p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Mediatrics-Seduction of Joe Tynan, 7, 9:15 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Cinema Guild-Blow Up, 7,9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
MEETINGS
University Rowing Club-Open meeting, 7:30 p.m., Henderson Rm.,
League.
Department of History-Undergraduate History Association meeting,
7:00 p.m., 3615 Haven.
Ann Arbor Tenants Union-Meeting, 7 p.m., 4109 Union.
Revolutionary Communist Youth Brigade-Panel discussion, "What
Are The Prospects of World War in the 1980's," 7:30 p.m., Pendleton Rm.,
Union.
SPEAKERS
Center for Japanese Studies-William Maim, "Japanese Music and the
Theory of Relativity," noon, Commons Rm., Lane Hall.
Office of Ethics and Religion-John Dinges, "Assassination on Embassy
Row: Chile's Terrorism in Wash., D.C.," 8 p.m!, Wesley Foundation (State
and Huron).
National Hispanic Heritage Week-Reynaldo Ruiz, "Vista Panoramica:
Historia y Cultura Chicana," 3 p.m., 228H West Engin.
WUOM-Douglas Fraser, "American Industry: Is It Competitive and
Productive Enough?," 10:30 a.m., 91.7 FM.
PERFORMANCES
Canterbuy Stage Company-"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," 8 p.m.,
Canterbury Loft.
The Ark-Bosom Buddies, 9 p.m., 1421-Hill.
MISCELLANEOUS
University Skydivers-First jump course, 7 p.m., 1042 East Engin.
The 12th Annual Michigan Oktoberfest-Polka Contest tryouts, 6-10
p.m., Fowlerville Fairgrounds, or call 1-517-223-3474.
To submit items for the Happenings column, send them in care of: Hap-
penings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109.

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You Are Cordially Invited
To A Presentation On
"The World Conference
of the UN Decade for Women"
Held In Copenhagen, July, 1980
Policy Address By
REGENT SARAH GODDARD POWER
Deoutv Assistant Secretary of State for

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