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September 16, 1980 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-16

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SPORTS

The Michigan Daily

Tuesday, September 16; 1980

Page 9

ANONYMOUS IN ANN ARBOR, FAMOUS IN TRACK CIRCLES

Heikkinen

By JOHN FITZPATRICK
He's broken a school record. He
alost was a member of the 1980 U.S.
rtpipic team. He's won a Big Ten
championship in track. Yet if you men-
tion his name as one of Michigan's
great athletes, more often than not the
response will be a puzzled look or an
inquisitive "Who?".
]an Heikkinen, though not the most
widely-known sports figure on campus,,
is one of the most accomplished mem-
bers of Michigan's sports teams.
THE THIN steeplechase runner (the
Wsteeple" is an almost two mile long
race run in outdoor track over three-
foot high barriers) with the fluid stride
has come from relative obscurity as an
8:37 steepler last year to being one of
the very best this country has. His sixth
place finishes in the NCAA trials and
the Olympic's testify to that.
In addition to his national accom-
plishments, the race which was a por-
nt of Heikkinen's world-class status
" runner was last Fall's NCAA cross-
country meet in Bethlehem, Pa., where
the underrated Heikkinen finished 18th,
bettering many well-known distance
men of international stature. "I'd like
to be in the top ten this year," notes
Hei~inen. .
liikkinen is also a top-notch middle
distAnce runner. After coming close to
breaking 4:00 for the mile indoors (his
b4 t was 4:02), Heikkinen exploded this
past outdoor season, as he started off by
ising more than a few eyebrows by
'uxiiing in three races at the Big Ten
Chainpionships, and doing superbly in
all of them. A first in the 10,000
(39:05.6), second in the steeple (8:39.5),
and -third in the 5,000 (14:13.5), left
Heikkinen exhausted and Michigan
with 24 points, which proved essential
to'its 162-136 title victory over pre-meet
favorite Indiana.
"'THE 10,000 was pretty easy. In the
eeple I was running for second-why
iljt'myself? Randy Jackson (of
Wisconsin, who won the steeple, was
the also NCAA champ) took it out so
fast I wouldn't have won, anyway.

"In the 5,000 I didn't fe
Before I was passed by Ran
diana's Jim) Spivey, I too
which really surprised them
At the NCAA meet, held in
eat of Austin, Texas inE

makingj
el too bad. 8:33.8-despite the unaccustomed
idy and (In- climate and an unforeseen race delay.
k the lead, "I DIDN'T feel good the whole
1.'.' day-it was really hot, in the 90's. They
nthe stifling were going to run the race at 6:30, and I
early June, got to the stadium at 5:30; then I found
out about the delay, so I had to wait for
two more hours."
Heikkinen laid back during the early
laps, but burst into the lead with 21/2
laps to go, in a seeming attempt to steal
the race. "I could only hold it for a lap,"
he said ruefully. "I didn't really think
I'd win.''

In the Olympic trials in June, held at
Eugene, Oregon, Michigan's two
greatest steeplers, Greg Meyer (Class
of '77) and Heikkinen, raced for the first
time over the barriers.
MEYER CAME to the meet with a
long list of credentials; he'd won the
national cross-country meet in '78, run
a 3:59 indoor mile, and set several
national road-racing records.
But Heikkinen, who says he "doesn't
get scared by big names," raced with a
furious aggression. He won his heat in a
fast 8:30, then beat Meyer soundly in

mark in track world

the final, almost catching arch-rival
Jackson(8:28.87) at the line with an
8:29.46 for sixth place; Meyer was ninth
in 8:40.7. "That was nice," commented
Heikkinen with quiet pride on his finish
over Meyer. "He's a great runner."
Once again he was racing under ad-
verse conditions, his trouble this time
stemming from an injured right knee.
"I was on crutches the day before the
race; I didn't think I'd be racing the
next day. As race time neared, though,
it cleared up. I was pleased running an

8:29 with a screwed-up knee!"
STILL, HE was convinced he could
have run faster; "I could have done an
8:25"-and without his knee ailment he
probably could have, for this was the
fastest steeple race in U.S. history, as
Henry Marsh of Athletics West set a
new U.S. record of 8:15.68,;and many of
the top finishers came close to the old
record of 8:19. Track and Field News
called it "the best race ever held on
American soil."

ADMITS BLUE MUST IMPROVE:
Bo credits Wildcats

By STAN BRADBURY
Bo Schembechler took the Alfred E.
Neuman approach to yesterday's
media luncheon concerning Michigan's
17-10 win over Northwestern-'What,
me worry?'
"I don't have as negative of a feeling
as everyone else does about the game
(against the Wildcats)," said Schem-
bechler. "I think a lot of the credit
should go to Northwestern. They're a
better Northwestern team than we have
played in the last few years."
All in all, Bo sounded calm in the
wake of facing a very tough Fighting
Irish squad next weekend in a zoo of
rowdiness known as Notre Dame
Stadium. The Irish blew off the Mark
Herrman-less Purdue Boilermakers 31-
10 ten days ago in their season opener.
"Anyone who saw the game last
Saturday realized that we were not
using everything available to us in ter-
ms of our offensive and defensive
thinking," Bo said, trying to downplay
the margin of victory. "We'll play a dif-
ferent kind of game this Saturday. It
will be a different ball of wax."
Notre Dame coach Dan Devine
agreed that the Northwestern contest
did not show what Michigan was really
like and that the films of the game are

Heikkinen earned a niche for himself
among the steepling elite with an
8:28.91 performance for sixth place,
breaking Greg Meyer's school record of

not really as valuable as they normally
are. "I don't think they'll (the films) do
us much good because of the conditions
of the field," said Devine. "What we
have decided is we're going to try to wet
down the things here as much as
possible."
Schembechler said that one reason
that Northwestern was able to stay so
close throughout the game was that,
"they played to overcommit their
defense to protect against the run. It
kept them in the game, but in the end it
killed them," Schembechler explained.
"We threw two long passes for touch-
downs, they threw two for intercep-
tions. That was the difference. We did
not overcommit the defense for the
weather like they did by bringing the
cornerbacks up to the line," said
Schembechler.
Schembechler said he only had two
criticism of his teams performance.
First, was that the Wildcats were able
to run up the middle too easily and
second was poor blocking by the offen-
sive backfield.
"This ended up being a very tough
football game, but in the long run it
might help the squad realize that they
have to be prepared to play all the
time."
PART-TIME
EMPLOYMENT
NIGHTS
The College of Literature,
Science and the Arts is cur-
rently interviewing students
interested in participating in
an alumni fund-raising tele-
thon. LSA alumni across the
country will be called from
campus. The telethon runs
five nights per week, Sunday
through Thursday, October 5
through November 20.
You have the option of work-
ing a minimum of two nights
per week to a maximum five
nights.
HOURS: 6:30 to 9:30
Pay: $3.50 per hour
LSA students preferred
Call 763-5576

Sept.
21

vi

I

f OP

ICIA

There Exist Vacancies on the Following Committees:
INTERNAL MSA COMMITTEES
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
BUDGET PRIORITIES COMMITTEE MICHIGAN
COMMUNICTIONS COMMITTEE STUDENT
LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS COMMITTEE M S A ASSEMBLY1
MINORITY AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
PERMANENT INTERVIEWING COMMITTEE
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS BOARD
SPECIAL PROJECTS COMMITTEE
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS COMMITTEE
EXTERNAL UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES
ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
RESEARCH POLICIES COMMITTEE
REVIEW PANEL FOR CLASSIFIED RESEARCH
STUDENT RELATIONS COMMITTEE
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE
CIVIL LIBERTIES BOARD
ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON RECREATIONAL SPORTS
LIBRARY COUNCIL (One must be Grad student)
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
U-CELLAR BOARD
COMPUTER FACILITIESAPLTO
COMPTER ACILTIESMichigan Student Assembly
OTHER POSITIONS AVAILABLE 3909 Michigan Union
EDITOR OF THE MAIZE P on Nm ber: 763U3241
UNION EXECUTIVE BOARD Phone Number: 763-3241
INSURANCE COMMITTEE

STIQUES

IHT1RRMANN, YOUNG KEY ATTACK:
Purdue's fortunes up in the air

°V By MARK MIHANOVIC
Editor's note: This is the eighth
in a series of nine articles examining
the 1980 Big Ten football season.
The series was written by Daily
Sports Editor Alan Fanger and
Executive Sports Editor Mark
Mihano vic.
When Purdue quarterback Mark
# errmann drops back.in the pocket and
pcks his right arm, "it's up in the air,"
so to speak, as to whom he will throw
tie football to. It might be flanker
Stever Bryant, the swiftest Boiler-
maker since Olympian Larry Burton
wore the gold and black. Or maybe split
end Bart Burrell, who hauled in 13
tosses for 190 yards in Saturday's 12-6
Purdue win over Wisconsin.
But it is just as likely that the aerial
will reach the sure hands of 6-6, 242-
pound senior Dave Young. And stay
here.
YOUNG, WHO combines his
awesome size with good speed, paced
Purdue receivers last season with 55
receptions, ten of which crossed op-
position goal lines. Those numbers ear-
ned him All-Big Ten and second team
All-American honors. If he isn't the best
college tight end in the country, a lot of
football people are mistaken.
As more and more Big Ten teams
tilize the pass to a greater degree in
their offenses, the tight end's ability to
catch and run with the football has in-
creased in importance. And Purdue
coach Jim Young has no qualms about
expressing an opinion about his tight
end.
"DAVE YOUNG IS a great tight

end," the fourth-year Boilermaker boss
(with a 19-4-1 record over the last two
years) said. He has great speed for a
tight end. We'll continue to throw to him
as many others are throwing more to
their tight ends."
Young has encountered criticism in
the past for a deficiency in the blocking
department, but he has shored up that
phase of his game to improve his
marketability for next January's
professional draft.
"They want to know if you can
block," the tight end explained. "That's
what they keep telling me, so I'm
working on it. My blocking's coming
along fine, for what I have to do."
HAPPILY FOR YOUNG, he will once
again be working with Herrmann, the
thin 6-5 Heisman Trophy candiate from
Indianapolis. As he enters his senior
year, Herrmann ranks as the Big Ten's
all-time leading passer with 6734 yards
and 48 touchdown passes.
Coach Young calls him "the greatest
passing quarterbck in college football.
There's no way to measure the con-
tfibutions he's made to Purdue football
over the last three years."
Experience abounds behind Herr-
mann, as four veterans return at tailb-
DISTINCTIVE
HAIRSTYLING FOR
MEN AND WOMEN
Try a 1980 NEW LONG or SHORT STYLE
THE DASCOLA
STYLISTS
Arborland ........ 971-9975
Maple Village .... 761-2733
Liberty off State .. 668-9329
East U. at So. U.... 662-0354

ek and senior John Macon (who rushed
for 913 yards in 1978) is the incumbent
at fullback. Pete Quinn and Henry Feil
are the 1979 holdovers on the offensive
line.
AS BORNE OUT by the Boilermakers
thrashing at the hands of Notre Dame,
the defense is the real trouble spot. All-
American lineman Keena Turner and
Ken Loushin graduated, as did stan-
douts Kevin Motts (linebacker), Mar-
cus Jackson (tackle), and Wayne Smith
(cornerback).
Tackle Calvin Clark and outside
linebacker Tom "Kamikaze"
Kingsbury provide the foundation for
an otherwise inexperienced defense.
TOMORROW: Wisconsin

SUNDAY
September 21 st
EMU's Bowen Field House

4 AM-7 PM

Sept. 21,
Oct. 19

Nov. 9
Dec. 7

Early birds will be welcomed at 4 AM to hunt for that special
treasure. You will find much furniture, such as early country,
Victorian, oak, Queen Anne, folk art, textiles, silver, porce-
lains, glass, china, special collections, pocket watches, minia-
ture lamps, stoneware, pewter, clocks, buttons, pistols and
guns, jewelry, paper, advertising, art glass, dolls, toys,
American Indian Baskets, early oils and prints.

N. EASTON, Mgr.

482-2326

M E D

I

C A L

S

C H O O L

Coming:
Tues. Sept. 23 &
Wed. Sept. 24
the original
MUGSY

Take the money worries out of medical school with an Armed Forces Health
Professions Scholarship. Full tuition. Books. Fees. Necessary equipment. And
$485 a month.
Once selected for a Physician scholarship-available from the Army, Navy or
Air Force-you are commissioned as a second lieutenant or an ensign in the
Reserve. Serve a 45-day active-duty period annually while in the program. And
agree to serve on active duty after graduation. You will serve one year for each
year of participation in the scholarship program (3-year minimum commitment).
You receive excellent salary and benefits. More importantly, you get invaluable
experience working beside dedicated medical people.

Pr'cam WF(KI'.HT FNJTFRTAIKIAAIKIT

Arrrrnr^i [:nrr no Crhnlorchinc Pn Pnv l 177F Hi tntinntnn gtatinn NIY 117AR

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