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September 16, 1980 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-16

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 16, 1980-Page 3
ONE IN SEVEN GET LUMP SUM OF $255
Study exam iesdeath benefts

WASHNGTON (AP)-A General Accounting
"ffice slidy indicates that one worker in seven who
dies colbcts nothing more from Social Security than
the $255.ump sum death benefit
The other six or their survivors get back more than
they pail in Social Security taxes, the GAO found.
THE GAO, A research and auditing arm of
Congress, issued a short report on the lump sum
death benefit, which the Carter administration
proposedin 1979 to do away wih.
Social Security has paid more than $6 billion in
death benefits since 1940, including $332 million on
Jehalf of 1.3 million workers or retirees who died in
1978,.the GAO noted.
The agency studied a raniom sample of 1,078 of the
death benefits paid in 197t It found 822,or 76.3 per-

cent, went to person who had gotten Social Security
while living. Their average age at death was 74.
THE 256 OTHERS, who were not on the Social
Security rolls, died at age 50 on average. But 103, or
9.5 percent, left survivors eligible for Social Security.
The remaining 153-14.2 percent-had no survivors
eligible for Social Security in July 1979, when the
GAO checked the records. -
It is possible that some of those 153 left widows or
other relatives who might collect Social Security on
their records in the future, Elliot Bushlow, a GAO
supervisory auditor, said yesterday.
THE SOCIAL SECURITY Administration
acknowledged the GAO's figures appeared accurate.
The agency itself checked death benefits in 1974 and
found that for 13 percent of insured workers, the lump

sum was the only payment they got back.
Some 8 per cent definitely left no survivors, but for
5 percent the possibility remained that a survivor
would collect in the future, the agency said.
Jim Brown, a spokesman for Social Security, noted
those who collect nothing but the death benefit also
were insured while they lived against disability and
toward retirement.
"IF A PERSON doesn't collect, he doesn't need it,"
said Brown. "That's the whole idea of social insuran-
ce."
The GAO said the original concept of the death
benefit "was to guarantee that individuals covered
by Social Security would receive some return on their
contributions." The concept has since changed to
providing help toward death and burial expenses.

ANNUAL COMPETITION FOR
OVERSEAS STUDY TO CLOSE SOON
The 1981-82 competition for grants for graduate study abroad offered
under the Fulbright Program and by foreign governments, corporations,
universities and private donors will close on October 31, 1980. Only a few
more weeks remain in which qualified graduate students may apply for one
of the approximately 511 awards which are available to 52 countries.
Most of the grants offered provide round-trip transportation, tuition
and maintenance for one academic year; a few provide international travel
only or a stipend intended as a partial grant-in-aid.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens at the time of application, and must
generally hold a bachelor's degree or its equivalent before the beginning
date of the grant and, in most cases, should be proficient in the language of
the host country. Except for certain specific awards, candidates may not
hold the Ph.D. at the time of application. Candiates for 1981 -82 are ineligible
for a grant to a country if they have been doing graduate work or conducting
researach in that country for six months or more during the academic year
1980-81.,
9 Creative and performing artists are not required to have a bachelor's
degree, but they must have four years of professional study or equivalent
experience. Social work applicants must have at least two years of profes-
sional experience after the Master of Social Work degree; candidates in
medicine must have an M.D. degree at the time of application.
Application forms and further Information for students currently
enrolled in The University of Michigan may be obtained from the
Pulbright Program Adviser, Mary H. Jarrett, who is located In Room
160 Rackham. The deadline for filing applications on this campus Is
September 29, 1950.

Grad student brutally murdered;
link to 2 other killings feared

(Continued from Page)
didn't believe that anyone eard noises
Sunday morning.
"OUR BEDROOM winow is right
there. I can't believe thatwe wouldn't
have heard anything i there was
noise," Kahn said. She aded, "I have
tlat 'mommy radar' thatets me up at
the least amount of noise.
Another neighbor sai she thinks
people might have been onfused about
#lihe timing. She explainechat earlier in
the morning-about 2 a.i.-she heard
s)outs and confusion froi outside. She
attributed the witness sports to con-
fusion over the exact tir.
Dohrman Byers, a rn who lives at
the other end of the emplex, said he
got up around 4 a.m.ind saw a man
wearing shorts jog b. He explained
thlat he didn't think aything of it until
he saw the man run to car.
"Then I saw the ta-lights of the car
gh on and saw the ca take off at a fast
clip," Byers said. H explained that he

couldn't see the man or the car very
well but he did notice that the man was
about six feet tall and thin.
The car was "sporty, maybe like a
Trans- Am," he added.
WILLIAM HUFF, the murdered vic-
tim's father, said, "What we know
about the case is what the police have
told us-that there's been three of them
(murders) in Ann Arbor recently.
What else can I think besides the fact
that the murderer is a psychopathic
killer?"
He added that his daughter received
a degree in art at Vanderbilt University
in Nashville, Tenn. and was a flight at-
tendant for six years before entering
the University of Michigan business
school.
While working as a flight attendant,
William Huff continued, his daughter
took classes in math at Harvard and
Boston Universities.

The Ann Arbor Police Department is
requesting that anyone who has
knowledge of these crimes or anyone
who believes he or she is witnessing an
assault in progress to notify the depar-
tment at 994-2875.
The department is also requesting
that unescorted females travelling af-
ter dark be especially alert for persons
following them or for prowlers as they

Center for Russian
and
East European Studies
is sponsoring a Colloquium:
"Has There Been a
Revolution. in Poland?!r'
Participants are GITELMAN, PRAVDA, SZPARLUK
Wednesday, September 17
arown-eag

ENERGY PLUS+FUEL SAVINGS

-HAPPENINGS

FILMS

Cinema Guik-Ivan the Terrible (Pt. 1), 7,9:05 p.m., Lorch Hall.
MEETINGS
Women in Cnmunications-7 p.m., Welker Room, Union.
GEO-genell membership meeting, 8 p.m., MLB 3.
Research (ub in Language Learning-4 p.m., East Conference Rm.,
Rackham.
Society of nristian Engineers-Luncheon Meeting, noon, League.
Bicycle Cb-1084 E. Engineering, 7:30 p.m.
Human Stuality Office-7:30 p.m., 814 Monroe.
MichiganL-5 Society-Meeting for space colonization, 7:30 p.m., 4202
Michigan ion.
SPEAKERS
Deparient of Geological Sciences-Prof. V. J. Wall, "The Structural,
.Metamephi, and Lithological Setting of Broken Hill (N.S.W.)
Minerapation", 4 p.m., C. C. Little.
Ann irbor Democratic Socialist Organization Committee-Michael
Harrinton, noon, 602 E. Huron.
Hispnic American Student Services-Emma Navajos di Ritting, "Puerto
Rico: ulture and History," 8 p.m., Rackham East Conf. Rm.
Int(national Center-Prof. Alan Whiting, "Prospects for Peace in Asia,"
12 p.t.
MAC-C. A. Patrides, "The Art of the Acropolis," 1408 Mason, 4 p.m.
Cbmistry-Colloquium, G. Hief je, "New Correlation-Based Approaches
to Tne-Resolved Spectroscopy," 4 p.m., 1300 Chemistry.
MISCELLANEOUS
cience of the People-Slideshow. "Machines, Migrants, and Monopo-,
lied' 7:30 p.m., Ann Arbor Public Library.
1UOM-New Dimensions: "Linus Pauling," 10 a.m., 91.7 FM.
,chool of Music-Piano Recital, Gwen Beamish, 7:30 p.m., Rackham
Asembly Hall.
'o submit items for the Happenings column, send them in care of: Hap-
piings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109.
UM~

+ADD A HEAT PUMP
TO YOUR PRESENT
FURNACE AND
TAKE THE HEAT OFF
YOUR FUEL BILLS
TNIS WINTER.
Now you can have one of
the new energy-efficient add-
on heat pumps wired to your
present forced-air furnace.
And let the heat pump heat
your home part of the time.
The dual heating system is
programmed to take advantage
of the highest efficiency factor
of both electricity and your
heating fuel.
Two heating systems can

more and more homes
constructed by builders
concerned about high fuel
costs.
With traditional fuels
becoming more scarce and
expensive, two heating
systems for two kinds of
weather-cold and colder--
make a lot of sense.
THE NEAT PUMP USES
NATURAL NEAT TO WARM
YOUR NOME.
Even in winter there's heat
in the outdoor air that can
help keep you warm. The trick
is to move that heat inside
where you can use it. That's
what the heat pump does.

IT WORKS SOMETNING LIKE
YOUR REFRIGERATOR.
Imagine the cold air in your
refrigerator as the cold winter
air outside your home. The
hot air you sometimes feel
being blown into your kitchen
is actually being extracted
from the cold air inside the
unit. This is how the heat
pump warms your home.
The heat pump is also an
air conditioner. In summer it
reverses automatically to
move heat out of your home.
THE ADD-ON HEAT PUMP
HELPS YOUR FURNACE
SAVE FUEL.
The heat pump provides the
first stage of heating. When
the nutdonr temnerarthur-

ELECTRICITT IS A PLENTIFUL
NEAT SOURCE
IN SOUTHEASTERN MICH6AN.
Chances are, electricity
already is helping to keep
your homewarm and '
comfortable in winfer. For if
you have a forced-air furnace,
electricity runs the blower.
With hot-water systems,
electricity operates the pump.
Fortunately, there's plenty
of electricity available to help
keep people warm in Detroit
Edison's 7,600-square-mile
service area. And it doesn't
depend on OPEC oil.
That's because Detroit Edison
generates more than
80 percent of its power from
coal, the nation's most

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