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September 14, 1980 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-14

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 14,l980-Page 7

Turkish military raids party offices

From UPI and AP
ANKARA, Turkey-The new military
regime seized the headquarters of
&urkey's extreme right and moderate
y P tpolitical parties yesterday, and
d to crush terrorism in nationwide
on leftist and rightist hideouts.
In a move to reassure Turkey's allies,
the ruling National Security Council of
. Kenan Evren said the strategic
NATPO nation would honor all foreign
liabilities and payments-debts amoun-
ting to a staggering $16 billion.
THE PRE-DAWN Friday coup,
friging to a blookless end th* political
infighting that had paralyzed the.
civilian government, prompted no ap-
parent public dissent. The mood here
and in Istanbul was one of relief.
!' Tanks and soldiers guarded major in-
tersections. Turks jammed shops that
had been closed in the takeover, and
hufried home before the night curfew
Weht into effect.
"'Curfew was relaxed ',until 8 p.m.,
taroks were thinned out from the capital
ahd' slum residents began
0whitewashing their walls of political
Jra'fiti.
THE RULING FIVE-man National
ecurity Committee, headed by Gen.
j enian Evren, 62-year-old chief of staff
aid; leader of the coup, restored inter-

national communications, reopened the
airport to international traffic, and an-
nounced banks would be operating
tomorrow.
Evren has promised Turkey will
remain friendly to the West and main-
tain its commitments to the North
Atlantic-Treaty Organization. Turkey,
traditional guardian of the strategic
Dardanelles dividing Europe and Asia,
anchors the southern and eastern
flanks of the NATO alliance.
It serves NATO in the crucial role of
buffer to the Soviet Union to the north,'
the troubled Mideast to the south, and'
revolutionary, fundamentalist Moslem
Iran to the east.
U.S. AMBASSADOR TO Turkey
James Spain spent the day denying1
charges that the United States was
behind Friday's military coup or knew
about it in advance-allegations that1
were fueled by the fact that Air Force1
Chief of Staff Gen. T hsin Shahankaha
returned from a vi t to the United
States Thursday night, only hours
before the coup that ousted Prime,
Minister Suleyman Demirel.
Evren, the armed forces chief-of-
staff, said he staged Turkey's third'
coup in 20years to stamp out terrorism,
end political bickering, and stem aE
rising tide of Islamic fundamentalism

Terrorist leader escapes
despite pleas to surrender

divided neighborhoods into spheres of
leftist or rightist control.
"The soldiers came and told me to
paint out the slogans, and I was happy
to do it," said one middle-aged worker.
"I did i, and I liked doing it.'
"Last night was the first night I

wasn'.t afraid to sit next to the window,"
another resident_ said
In the Ankara slum of Esertepe, an
army commando dressed in
camouflage fatigues and toting a sub-
machine gun hopped on a skate board
belonging to a local youngster and went
careening down the street-gun and all.

that he said was pushing Turkey to the
brink of civil war.
On the second day of martial law, his
troops raided targets of both the left
and the right-including Moslem fun-
damentalists-and uncovered an un-
disclosed amount of machine guns, ex-
plosives and material used for making
bombs, reports said.
ARMY TROOPS SEIZED control of
the left-leaning Republican People's
Party headquarters, whose leader,
Bulent Ecevit, was reported sharing a
prison island with Demirfl, his long-
time rival.
"You must leave," a soldier politely
but firmly told one foreigner. "This is
no headquarters, there is no political
party."
Unconfirmed reports said as many as
120 parliamentary deputies as well as
other politicians also were arrested.
But Alparslan Turkes, leader of the
extreme right National Action Party
blamed for much of the rightit terror,I

eluded capture. Turkish Radio broad-
cast an appeal to Turkes to surrender.
ABOUT 40 TURKISH leftists oc-
cupied the Turkish consulate in West
Germany for several hours yesterday
to protest the military coup in their
homeland, police reported.
They said the invaders, who carried
placards and draped the offices with
political banners, left the building
peacefully and there was no violence.
Leaders of the group delivered a
petition to consular officials protesting
the military takeover, demanding
Turkey's withdrawal from the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization, and
calling for the banning of a right-wing
Turkish group known as the Gray
Wolves, a police spokesman said.
USING PAINT SUPPLIED by
soldiers, Anakara's slum dwellers
whitewashed their walls to obliterate
the political graffiti that had long

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REPOR TS REVEAL CONTINUED CORRUPTION:

GSApractie
N WASHINGTON (AP)-The drumbeat of publicity has
epded. The flood of indictments has slowed to a trickle. The
scandal that rocked the General Services Administration ap-
4rs to be fading into history. ,
But some investigators, from both Congress and the GSA
itself, are wondering whether any real lessons were learned.
. THE SCANDAL EXPLODED into public view in 1978 with
4blished reports about contractors being paid to paint
>vernment wall space that did not exist and federal stock-
les being pilfered.
The 'disclosures' made the letters "GSA" almost
4nopymous with government corruption, and President
arter personally pledged a thorough investigation into
problems that dated back several administrations.
But two recent reports by Congress' watchdog arm, The
eneral Accounting Office, found continued
ismanagement of two of the most abused areas of GSAac-
t vities: The self-service stores and so-called "multiple
ards schedule" that allows officials to shop by catalog for
r*illions of different items, ranging from typewriters to party
vars.
i PERSONALLY DON'T see any significant im-
rovement in GSA," said Howard Davia, GSA's top auditor.
"The same opportunity is there, the same players are there."
D Davia said GSA's new leadership has shown little deter-
nination to punish officials who waste money and has not
significantly reformed abused GSA programs.
"There is just not the inclination to get tough," he said.
MORE THAN. TWO ears after the scandal surfaced,
)some of those most deeply involved in the investigation
nueston whether it ever got close to the bottom of corruption
at the government's multibillion-dollar buildingand supply
agency.
The investigation has led, by GSA count, to the convictions
f 143 low- and middle-level federal employees and gover-
ment contractors. Not a single high-ranking government of-
icial was indicted.
Liberal Party
NEW YORK (AP)-The Liberal Par- carrying New Yor

es under fire
Officials currently directing the probe say they have pur-
sued the evidence aggressively. However, two former top
GSA officials said they suspect a political decision was made
not to press the investigation.
"MY ONLY JUDGMENT is that somebody didn't want
the investigation to be continued," former GSA Ad-
ministrator Jay Solomon said in a recent interview.
Solomon, a Carter appointee who helped bring the scandal
to light but left in early 1979 apparently under White House
pressure, refused to say who he things might have wanted the
investigation stopped.
In a separate interview, William A. Clinkscales Jr., the
GSA's former top investigator, said, "There's no question in
my mind that if the administration had supported the GSA
investigation it would have led to higher-level officials, who
at minimum allowed the offenses to continue."
THE SUGGESTION, HOWEVR, that the investigation has
not been energetically pursued brings angry denials from of-
ficials currently in charge of the probe.
"If the implication is that we have set our sights at the
lowest level ... I resent that suggestion," said Muellenberg.
"I would be tickled pink to get the so-called big fish."
Clinkscales, although still working at GSA, was re-
assigned "early this year because of differences with his new
superior, GSA Inspector Genral Kurt Muellenberg.
Both Solomon and Clinkscles said the problem with the in-
vestigation can be traced back to Solomon's firing in mid-
1978' of former GSA No. 2 man Robert Griffin, a friend of
House Speaker Thomas O'Neill Jr.
From that point on, Solomon said his relations with the
White House cooled and the investigation began to "go
downhill."
Although Solomon said at the time that Griffin was being
dismissed because of management disagreements, not
because of the scandal, the firing outraged O'Neill, who com-
plained publicly that his friend had been treated "shabbily."
OKs Anderson

k in November."

ty followed the lead of its policy com-
mittee yesterday and backed the in-
dependent presidential candidacy of
John Anderson, breaking a 36-year
tradition of support for the Democratic
nominee.
The party chose Anderson by a vote
of 85,590.5 to 9,896 for President Carter.
Anderson, campaigning on the West
Coast, said in a statement released by
,his campaign office that he was
} "delighted" by the action.
"Once again the traditionally Liberal
Party has shown that it is willing to put
principles above politics," he said, ad-
ding that he and his running mate,
i Patrick J. Lucey, "look forward to

The vote for the Republican
congressman came after two and one-
half hours of factious debate although
the party's backing was considered a
foregone conclusion after its executive
committee decided the week before to
recommend that Anderson's name ap-
pear on the party's line in the Novem-
ber general election. Also appearing on
the Liberal line will be the name of Sen.
Jacob Javits, who on Tuesday lost the
Republican Party's nomination for
another term in office.
Carter, who had the Liberal backing
in 1976, had courted it this year. The
party's decision to back the Illinois
congressman was seen as a blow to the

Carter efforts to win New York's 41
electoral votes.
The party's leadership contended
that Carter had ignored the party and
its liberal principles.
"The Liberal Party is not just a ling;
it's a cause," said party chief Raymond
Harding at yesterday's session. "By
nominating John Anderson, we reaf-
firm that cause."

MEET CAPITOL RECORDS' RECORDING ARTISTS THE MOTELS
MONDAY, SEPT. 14-3 pm at Schoolkids' Records
(Records)
523 E. Liberty
994-8031

FRIDAY, SEPT. 19

SATURDAY, SEPT. 20

SUNDAY, SEPT. 21

r

7:15
PLAN NINE FROM
OUTER SPACE(1959)
dl IZA

1:30
THE TERFEOR OF
TINY TOWN(1938)

3:30

7:15

BRIDE OF THE
MONSTER(1953)
&2.50~

THE ATTACK OF THE
KILLER TOMATOES(1978)
tn

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