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September 13, 1980 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

V 9

MW

-W

AW

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, Sept

Page 16 -Saturday, Septernber' 13, 1980-LThe Michigan Dciy
A lot of weapons for mystery QB

(Continued from Page 2)
both 6-6, 270-pounders line up at the
tackles.
There is no lack of depth for the
Wolverines up front, either. Tony
Osbun (6-5, 253) and Rich Strenger (6-7,
245) push Muransky and Paris at
tackle, Mark Warth (6-6, 248) and Tom
Garrity (6-4, 245) are the backup guar-
ds, and Jeff Felten (6-2, 227) is the
number two center, although he will be
out of action for a few weeks with a
strained knee.
"This will be the biggest line we've
ever had," Schembechler enthused.

"We figure we got 11 guys, from tackle
to tackle, ready to play."
SPEED IS ABUNDANT at the wide
receiver spots. Sophomore sensation
Anthony Carter, who suffered a slight
shoulder injury in last Saturday's in-
trasquad scrimmage, averaged 27.2
yards per catch last season and crossed
the goal line seven times (including the
last-play miraculous score that beat
Indiana, 27-21). Alan Mitchell (6-1, 185)
is slated to line up at the other wide
spot, with Rodney Feaster, Kenny Geer,
and Zeke Wallace right behind him.
Junior Norm Betts (6-5, 230) is
Schembechler's choice to replace the
graduated Doug Marsh at tight end.
"He does not have great speed, but he
gets the absolute maximum out of his
ability," the coach explained. "He's
kind of a mistake-proof guy, he's a
smart kid, and I feel very comfortable
with him there." Senior Chuck
Christian and sophomore Craig
Dunaway are his backups.
Possibly the biggest area of concern
for those Blue football followers who
languished through last season's
frustratingly close losses is the kicking
game. Bryan Virgil, who became a
household name in the Ann Arbor area
(albeit not a popular one) as a result of
his 1979 performance in field goal at-
tempts and four blocked punts, elected
to bypass his final year of eligibility.
The heir apparent, Ali Haji-Sheikh,
wasn't very effective himself (0-6),
although most of his misses were from
long range.
With an offense as explosive as
Michigan's, Haji-Sheikh may not have
to worry as much about long-range field
goals as much as he might worry about
chip-shot extra points.
That is, depending on the effec-
tiveness of the guy barking signals
behind Lilja. Whoever the mystery man
may be, he'll have ample offensive
weaponry at his service.

George Lilja
Help prevent
birth defects
SUPPORT
MARCH
OF DIMES

IN A SIGHT that became familiar to Wolverine fans in 1979, freshman star
Anthony Carter makes a leaping touchdown catch versus Northwestern in
the opening game. Carter dazzled opposition defenses by averaging 22.7 yards
per reception last season, and coach Bo Schembechler looks for more of the
same from him in '80, although he is listed as doubtful for today's game with
a bruised shoulder.

THE LINES ON HIS FACE have drawn more distinct, but the man still
remains. Bo Schembechler enters his 12th season as Michigan's head coach
and finds himself in an unusual situation. The Wolverines have been picked
to finish as low as fourth in the Big Ten and Schembechler is determined to
win the close ones this season-Michigan lost four games by a total of 10
points in 1979.
Big TwoLAitle Fight
m ythvamsesas
Purdue, Indiana
vie for league title

WEL COME
A DELICATE
How long has it been since y
homemade chicken soup with
lighter than air? How long since
corned beef sandwich on h
Jewish rye? With must
Or maybe Russian dres
A side of chopped liver made v
And finally cheesecake - thici
topped with fresh fruit and s
Well, welcome to a really gc
THE MARKET PLA(
Like any good deli, we offer ca
so you can enjoy our delicaci
at the office, or on a p
Visit The Market Place at Detro
We're open Tues.-Fri. 11am-9
7am-9pm.
~TE MARKET I

Year
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979,

Bo 's teams
in the polls
AP
.................. 9th
.................. 9th
...................6th
8 th
.~6th
.................. 3rd
..................3rd
.8th
3rd
........... . 9th
... . ... . 5th
... . . .. . . . . 18th

UPI
7th
7th
4th
6th
6th
5th
8th
3rd
8th
5th
19th

1979 'M'
Player honors
MOST VALUABLE PLAYER-Ron
Simpkins
BOWL GAMES-Hula (Doug Marsh,
Curtis Greer, Simpkins); Senior
(Ralph Clayton; Japan (Mike Harden,
Dale Keitz, Mark Braman); East-
West (Mike Jolly).
NFL DRAFT-Curtis Greer (1. St.
Louis); Doug Marsh (2. St. Louis);
Ralph Clayton (2. N.Y. Jets); Mike
Jolly (4. New Orleans) ; Mike Har-
den (5. Denver); Ron Simpkins (7.
Cleveland).

A

REBRIGHT .
Turn out
the light!
(and save electricity)

As anyone who has followed Big Ten ;
football should know, neither Michigan nor
Ohio State has cakewalked to a conference
title in recent years. And now, with the
resurgence of Purdue and Indiana, title-
chasing becomes an even harder game to
play. In the following article, Daily Sports
Editor Alan Fanger and Exec tive Sports 1
Editor Mark Mihanovic take a brief look at1
each of the other nine Big Ten teams. The ]
stories are listed in alphabetical order, not in
order of predicted finish.
Illinois
The name of the game is change for 1
the Illini, as new coach Mike White
assumes the unenviable task of turning ]
around a team that has won only one
conference contest in the past two Big
Ten campaigns.
White, former head coach at Califor-
nia-Berkeley and a respected offensive
tactician, plans on improving Illinois's
woeful attack (ninth in the Big Ten in
yardage per game last season) through
implementation of, as he calls it, "the
off-balance theory."
WHITE'S PROBLEM is that of fin-
ding the right person to direct his wide-
open, multiple-formation offense. Rich
Weiss, a scrambling-type who has been
injury-prone throughout his college
career, and two junior-college tran-,

sfers, Dave Wilson and Tony Eason, are
the candidates.
In Wayne Strader and Calvin
Thomas, Illinois has two strong-
blocking fullbacks, but White isn't set-
tled as to who will be his "big-play"
man at halfback. The Illini are solidwat
the receiving positions, but they will
have to overcome a lack of depth in the
front wall to move the ball on Big Ten
defenses.
All-American candidate Kelvin
Atkins heads a strong corps of
linebackers, but the defensive line and
backfield pose major question marks.
For the Illini to significantly im-
prove, good kicking will have to play a
major role.
Indiana
Lee Corso, the man of 1,000 jokes,
can now pin the ultimate crack on his
colleague Bob Schembecher-his In-
diana team won more bowl games than
did Schembechler's Michigan team
during the past decade. No big deal,
other than the fact that Corso suc-
ceeded in his first attempt at post-
season play, while Bo came out a loser
in all seven tries.
See HOLY, Page 10

i a

delicates.,..

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