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September 13, 1980 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-13

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, September 13, 1980-Page 3
A2 STRIKE CONTINUES
Board makes offer

Daily Photo by DAVID HARRIS:
PART OF THE Ingalls Street pedestrian mall is done, but the completion of the walkway between MLB and the
Michigan League won't be finished until funds become available.
First Stage of In gaS
Mal project comp leted

By JULIE BROWN
Ann Arbor's eleven-day old school
strike continued yesterday, with school
board negotiators making a contract of-
fer early yesterday morning.
According to Assistant Superinten-
dent of Schools Robert Moseley,
negotiators for the school board put for-
th the formal proposal shortly before
negotiations ended at approximately
1:30 a.m. Negotiations were originally
scheduled to resume at 3 p.m. yester-
day.
MOSELEY, CONTACTED shortly af-
ter 9 p.m. last night, said negotiations
were not taking place at that time.
"We're waiting and waiting," he
said. "We've been here since 3 o'clock,
and no one has come in from the
education association to indicate a
willingness to talk."
Ann Arbor Education Association
spokesman Dan Burroughs, contacted
at 10:15 p.m., said, "I would say, as far
as I know at this time, our team is in-
volved in negotiations. They may not be
sitting at the table, but I'm sure they're
at the site."
BURROUGHS SAID he spoke with
teachers' association President
Richard Taylor at approximately 6
p.m. yesterday at which time Taylor
indicated that he was at the
negotiations site. He also said that the
teachers still intended to respond to the
school board offer following discussion
amongst themselves.
According to Burroughs, the
teachers' association negotiating team
requested the break in negotiations for
purposes of rest and discussion.
"It wasn't just for the purpose of
talking it over," he said. Teachers'
association negotiators were concerned
about responding to the proposal during
It's
SEIILCEITZ
at
1140 South University
668-8411

the marathon session, he said, because
of fatigue.
ASSISTANT Superintendent Moseley
declined to discuss specific aspects of
the school board offer, but noted that it
included a salary settlement and
provision dealing with all other issues
on the table.
Major non-salary issues in the strike
have been assessment of teacher
qualifications in determining layoff
procedures, assignment of homerooms
to intermediate school teachers,
elementary school class size, racial
composition of the system's staff, and
teacher transfers within the system.
The manner in which missed school
days would be made up has also been a

Woman thwarts attacker

An 18-year-old Ann Arbor woman
reported an attempted criminal sexual
assault Thursday morning at 5:00,
police reported yesterday. Police said it
was still unkown if the woman was a
student but the attempted assault oc-
curred in the 800 block of Oakland, a
campus-area residence. The woman

said she was awakened when the would-
be assailant placed his hand over her
mouth and told her he was going to
sexually molest her. She grabbed hi
knife, screamed, ,and struggled. Her
roommate came in response to the
screams and the suspect fled. The case
is still under investigation.

subject of concern, as evidenced by
questions put forth by students at a
student-organized rally Thursday af-
ternoon at Pioneer High School.
Yesterday's contract offer from the
school board marked the culmination of
a virtual marathon session, which
began at 10 a.m. Wednesday and, ex-
cept for meal breaks, continued
throughout Wednesday night, Thur-
sday, and ended early yesterday. A
nine-hour negotiating session Tuesday
was the first since talks broke off early
in the evening of Friday, Sept. 5.
The St. ike, involving some 1,061 per-
sonnel, is the largest of 18 school strikes,
statewide.

By JOHN SPELICH
zAlthough the first stage of construction on the Ingalls
Mall is complete, University architects are not sure where
the project will go from there.
At present, only half of the west side of Ingalls St., which
runs between the Modern Languages Building and the
Michigan League, has been closed and replaced with grass
land walkways.
THE REST OF the project-including closing both sides
f the street and replacing the area with grass and brick
walkways, and expansion of the pool around the fountain-is
expected to be completed over an unspecified number of
ears as money becomes available, according to University
pa.ers .
Part of a master plan drawn up in 1963 for University
reconstruction, the Ingalls Mall project has been modified
+everal times and will likely undergo further changes up un-
til the time of completion, Landscape Architect Ken Wanty
Said.
Another major facet of the plan is the construction of a
walkway on East University Ave. between the C.C. Little
Building and South University Ave.

"WE'RE CHIPPING AWAY a little each year, but it will
be some time until the East University walkway is finished,"
University Planner Fred Mayer said.1
According to University architects, a large sum of money
was saved by starting the construction projects during the
summer. Mayer said the budget for the first stage of the
Ingalls project was $90,000, but a University architect who
asked not be identified said the actual cost was far below that
figure.
"Contractors are eager to work and this has created a
good bidding climate," the architect said.
LAST YEAR MICHIGAN League Facilities Manager
Patricia Lawson resisted the Ingalls Mall project becaue of
the resulting loss of parking spaces on the street for visitors
to the League.
Lawson now, however, appears to have softened her
position. "The University has responded quite well. They have
listened to our board, which has been involved with the plan-
ning committee," she said.
Both the Ingalls and East University properties were ob-
tained by the University from the city of Ann Arbor.

There Exist Vcencies on the Following Committees:
INTERNAL MSA COMMITTEES
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
BUDGET PRIORITIES COMMITTEE A NCMHGAN
COMMUNICTIONS COMMITTEE STUDENT
LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS COMMITTEE ASSEMBLY
MINORITY AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
PERMANENT INTERVIEWING COMMITTEE
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS BOARD
SPECIAL PROJECTS COMMITTEE
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS COMMITTEE
EXTERNAL UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES
ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
RESEARCH POLICIES COMMITTEE
REVIEW PANEL FOR CLASSIFIED RESEARCH
STUDENT RELATIONS COMMITTEE
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE
CIVIL LIBERTIES BOARD
ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON RECREATIONAL SPORTS
LIBRARY COUNCIL (One must be Grad student)
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
U-CELLAR BOARDAPLTO
COU TER FARILITIES A PPLY TO:
COMPTER ACILTIESMichigan Student Assembly
OTHER POSITIONS AVAILABLE 3909 Michigan Union
EDITOR OF THE MAIZE Phone Number: 763-334
UNION EXECUTIVE BOARD
INSURANCE COMMITTEE

if

Fear of losing revenue
'U' factions against Tis

Continued from Page 1)
But the soldiers have to be careful.
egally, University officials can inform
Or educate, but they can't urge a "no"
vote on the tax-cut proposal.
The Tisch tax-cut plan is named after
the Shiawassee drain commissioner
who authored it. It is often referred to
as "Tisch II" because Tisch proposed
his first tax-slashing plan in 1978. It did
pot pass.
IF ADOPTED, THE Tisch plan would
reduce state revenues by about $2
billion. The state generally spends
aoubt $10 billion each year, but after the
part of the budget that's committed to
local governments and other in-
stitutions through federal plans is gone,
there's just over $3 billion left. The $2
billion Tisch cut would come from that.
With what's left over, the state would
have to support higher education, state
employees, and all social services.
Tisch doesn't see that as necessarily
ad. Part of his plan says that state
support for education won't drop
bgecause of the property tax cuts. But
his foes want to know from where the
money will come. That's part of the
reason Tisch is still fighting in court to
get his proposal on the ballot. (The
state Supreme Court is expected to rule
on that by Monday.)
Another part of Tisch's plan that
worries higher education officials is his
interpretation of tuition as a tax. Under
his plan, 60 per cent of the state's voters
would have to approve any tuition in-
crease.
BUT IF THE University loses most of
its state revenues and it can't raise

tuition unless the voters approve it, the
University will be caught up in a real
Catch-22, University administrators
say.
Two other tax reform proposals will
be offered on the November ballot: The
Smith-Bullard and the Legislative
Coalition plans, Proposals A and C,
respectively. Both of these plans offer a
shift from property taxes to either in-
come or sales taxes and would not in-
volve a significant loss of state revenue.
The University does not have a position
on either tax plan.
"I literally think we can scare people
into (voting against the tax cut)," MSA,
President Marc Breakstone said
yesterday during a meeting of Univer-
sity leaders.
MAL BAROWAY, DIRECTOR of
state and community relations, jumped
in, "It is a real scare."
In a short bnainstorming session, the
group members pondered tax-cut
fighting tactics.
James Thiry, University director of
personnel, thought that giving staff
members the chance to "brown bag"
their lunches and learn about what
they'd be voting on-all at once-was a
good idea.
Former MSA. President Jim Alland
said students could be educated on
Tisch II in conjunction with MSA's
voter registration plan.
DENTISTRY PROF. RICHARD Cor-
pron suggested realtors be informed
that the property tax cut would hurt,
rather than help, in persuading
businesses to come to the state. In-
dustries would look at a state's

unites
ch plan
educational system-not just its low
property taxes-in making decisions
about location, he said. Corpron, like all
the others at yesterday's meeting, is
convinced that Proposal D would ruin
the state's educational system.
Be that as it may, University General
Counsel Roderick Daane told the crowd
of almost 20 that the University could
"inform (voters) but not exhort"on the
tax plan issue.
Through publications such as The
University Record and the alumni
magazine, the University plans to "in-
form" parents, the entire state alumni
population, "friends" of the Univer-
sity, and the general public of the tax
cut's impact on higher education, ac-
cording to Baroway.
THE SLIDE PRESENTATION,
which will be used in some form by
every college and university in the
state, will be lugged anywhere an
audience can be found.
Some groups, such as the campus
chapter of the American Association of
University Professors (AAUP) will
sponsor forums on the various tax
plans.
How else might the Tisch plan be
fought? A debate sponsored by
Viewpoint Lectures, perhaps?
"The last I heard, Tisch was charging
$750 for an appearance,"LSA Student
Government President Dan Solomon
said.
"But who would we put up against
him?" Assistant Vice-President for
Student Services Tom Easthope asked.
"Easthope," suggested Alland.
But Easthope, said Easthope, doesn't
"do public forums."
The Ann Arbor
Film Cooperative
Presents
atML B4:
Alfred Hitchcock
Night with
FRENZY, a stylish film about
a necktie strangler and a falsely
accused young man who runs from
the police in pursuit of the real

Hewlett-Pack ard.
?4
The Ace in a
Winning Hnd
the HP- 34 C
"*38 SCIENTIFIC FUNCTIONS
-UP TO 20 MEMORIES
'UP TO 210 PROGRAM LINES, USING ALL 20
MEMORIES FOR PROGRAM STEPS
SOLVES FOR REAL ROOTS OF AN EQUATION
SOLVES NUMERICAL INTEGRATION
*LIST PRICE $150.00 Our Price $122.90

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-HAPPENINGS-
FILMS
UAC Mediatrics-"The Rose", Nat. Sci. Aud., 6:30,9:00, and 11:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-"Tree of Wooden Clogs," Lorch Hall, Aud., 7 and 10:15
p.m.
Ann Arbor Film Cooperative-"Frenzy," MLB 4, 7p.m. and "Family Plot,
MLB 4, 9p.m.
Cinema II-"Bang the Drum Slowly," Aud. A, 7 and 9 p.m.
Alternative Action-"Monty Python and the Holy Grail", MLB 3, 7 and 9
'p.m.
cL A I7 V T;"

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