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September 04, 1980 - Image 48

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-04

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!age 14-A-Thursday, September 4, 1980-The Michigan Daily
U' hospital p1
.4Regents OK n
By MITCH STUART the Detroit-based Albert
University Regents unanimously ates told the Regents.
selected a general architectural design The design calls for an
x for the $210 million-plus University unit, a diagnostic and tr
Hospital replacement project and an ambulatory care unit,
authorized planners to begin develop- and administration un
ment of schematic drawings. parking structures.
The plan chosen, described by ar- HARO CITED THE pla
chitects as a "modified pavilion" and relative economy as
< design, calls for six separate but in- vantages. The pavilion is
tegrated structures to house the essen- than other designs in boti
tial hospital units. and usage, Haro said,
THE PAVILION design (designated various units can be adz
as Block Plan "C") was chosen over struction proceeds andz
two other plans presented to the Board. field changes over the yea
Block Plan C "really responds to all The pavilion desig
the criteria," architect John Haro of economical than the oth

an chosen;
ew facility

Kahn Associ-
inpatient care
eatment unit,
an education
it, and two
an's flexibility
its major ad-
more flexible
h construction
because the
apted as con-
as the health
rs.
n' is more
ers because it

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can easily be built in separate phases,
utilizing ~many different contractors,
and following several separate sets of
building codes, Haro explained.
One consultant told the Regents the
cost for the very complex construction
required in some of the medical units is
more than double the cost for the office-
type construction that would be used in
other units.
THE TWO DESIGNS not chosen by
the Regents both called for a single
"monolithic" building to house most or
all of the hospital's essential units.
The Regents also discussed a con-
struction method known as "fast-
tracking" that would allow construc-
tion on some units to begin before all of
the working drawings for other .units-
are completed.-
Consultants have said if fast-tracking
is used, construction could begin as
early as 1982 and be completed as early
as 1985.
SEVERAL MEMBERS of*the Board
expressed concern over the dangers in-
volved in commiting University funds
before full plans are finished and before
the exact amount of the state's ap-
propriation for the replacement
hospital project is known.
"There is no way on earth that any of
us are going to expose (the University)
to a high degree of risk," said Regent
Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor).
But Regent Thomas Roach (D-
Saline) later said, "Everything we (the
Regents) do is a risk. If we started
playing the 'what if' game . . . we'd
never get anything done. I think this
Board is absolutely committed to get-
ting this hospital built."
Regent Robert Nederlander (D-
Birmingham) said he wantead to set
down a list of priorities right away, so
that if program cutbacks are later
necessary, there will be no indecision
on which programs to cut.
University President Harold Shapiro
assured Nederlander that work on just
such a priority list was underway.
Shapiro informed the Regents that
Governor William Milliken informally
agreed that the state would fund up to
79 per cent of the project, with a ceiling
of $200 million on the state's portion 01
the project cost.
An additional $35 million to $50
million is expected from hospital
revenues, and $20 million more is ex-
pected ing ifts; Shapiro said. That puts
a tentative limit of $255 million to $270
million on the project.
The remaining steps in the hospital
replacement program are: preparation
of schematics (expected to take ten
months and cost $5 million); final state
approval of the program; preparation
of working drawings; acceptance of
bids and awarding of contracts; and
construction itself.

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
THIS SCALE MODEL of the medical campus, as seen from the north, was presented to the Regents last April. The road in
the foreground will be constructed to allow better access to the new hospital that will be built on the north side. The old
main hospital, which can be seen in the upper right corner, will eventually be demolished.
'U' may create health

plan for county

By MITCH STUART
University officials are currently
contemplating a plan to institute a
University-sponsored health main-
tenance organization in Washtenaw
County.
A health maintenance organization.
or "HMO," is an alternative to major
medical plans offered by insurance
companies like Blue Cross/Blue Shield.

The HMO provides both health insuran-.
ce and health care for its paying mem-
bers.
IN A REPORT submitted to the,
Regents at their June meeting, an HMO
study committee recommended the
establishment of a county-wide HMO
sponsored by the University.
"The Study Committee has concluded

06

esidents
that the best way for the University
provide HMO benefits to its staff
through a University-sponsored HMO is
through an HMO open to all the people
in Washtenaw County and several ad-
jacent communities," the report stated.
The HMO report sparked heated
debate at the Regents meeting over the
University's role in the Washtenaw
community.
Regent Deane Baker was furious that
the University had lobbied to change a
state law to make establishing anH
easier.
University officials assured the Ani
Arbor Democrat that they had been ac-
ting in the University's best interest,
but Baker said he was "deeply offen-
ded" that the administration had lob-
bied on the state level without approval
from the Regents.
Baker said the University was con-
sidering a "fundamental change"in its
role as an educational institution
contemplating an HMO for all
Washtenaw County.
University administrators explained
to Baker they were trying to economize
on health insurance for University em-
ployees, and for that reason were ex-
ploring the possibility of an HMO.
The study committee recommended
to the Regents that the University
establish an HMO rather than offer ar
HMO option to employees through
another institution or company.
"Many universities offer the H1
option to their. employees throug
existing community-wide HMOs, by
payment of all or part of the premium
required to these community-wide
HMOs," the report stated. "That option
is currently not available to the- great
majority of University employees on
the Ann Arbor campus, since no HMO is
functioning in Washtenaw County
Establishment of an HMO that wouk
serve the entire community, as well
University staff, would be recognize
as an important contribution to the
community by the iUniversity. It is
however, entirely possible to wait unti
one of the HMOs functioning in Wayne
County decides to expand service tc
Washtenaw, or until an existing
Washtenaw County entity might for it
own reasons organize an HMO. The
Study Committee feels there is mqre tc
be gained for the University by moving
ahead than by waiting."
The Regents will consider moving
the planning phase for an HMO at their
September meeting.

I Lbet 'splay

Daily Photo by
CYRENA CHANG

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