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September 07, 1980 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Hoffman recalls exploits

(Continued from Page 3)
public television station in Boston and
he police grabbed his car. He fled to
Walifornia and there "I started to know
I was cracking up.",
HE DECIDED TO go to Las Vegas
because "I thought it was the safest city
in the country to crack up in." When he
got to his hotel he told Johanna: "Don't
Stat
pri-marites
From United Press International
Thirteen states hold primaries Tues-
Oday with Sens. Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.)
Wand Richard Stone (D-Fla.) and Ab-
scam Congressman Frank Kelly of
Florida all fighting for their political
lives.
Former Sen. James Buckley (R-
N.Y.) is trying to get back in the
Senate, but not from New York. This
tine he is running from Connecticut,
where he is favored to win the
Republican primary.
Also on the comeback trail is former
*New Hampshire Gov. Meldrim Thom-
son, the fiesty conservative who is
favored to win the GOP nomination for
his old post and face the man who beat
himnx two years ago, Democratic Gov.
Hugh Gallen.
LOUISIANA HOLDS its primary next
Saturday, when Senate Finance Com-
mittee Chairman Russell Long,
perhaps the Senate's most powerful
man, has four challengers offering little
dompetition in a primary. Long is spen-
ing $1 million and wagaing an all-out
campaign as if he were not the latest
and strongest of the Long family
plitical dynasty in Louisiana.
Incumbents on the safe or unopposed
list Tuesday include Sens. Gary Hart
(D-Colo.), Sen. Paul Laxalt (R-Nev.),
Sen. John Durkin (R-N.H.), and Gaylor
Nelson, (D-Wis.).
Javits, 76, has served 24 years in the
Senate. He faces his fgst primary
Sehallenge ever-from Alphonse
D'Amato, presiding supervisor of the
Long Island town of Hempstead.
DI'Amato is a conservative and has at-
tacked Javits for his liberal voting
record, his age, and health. Javits has a
progressive muscular nerve disease.

let me out of the room. Don't let me
near the tables."
He pointed to the hotel lobby ceiling.
"See the holes up there," he said.
"They're watching. They don't care
what we do in the rooms. We can rip up
the beds; we can throw lamps. Down
here, we make one wrong move and we
end up in jail."
Hoffman winced and furrowed his
brow as he recalled this.
IN 1976, PLAYBOY magazine blew
Hoffman's cover and he immediately
left Mexico. He lived in the Southwet for
a while and then went to Montreal.
There, he worked as a laborer, lived
in a "wino hotel" and was so "strung
out, I didn't know which neighborhood I
was in." Finally, he got help from a
Marxist psychiatrist.. "We used the
knowledge we both had and it worked
itself out."
Later that year, Hoffman and Johan-
na moved into a turn-of-the century cot-
tage in Fineview that had been in Miss
Lawrenceson's family for years.
THERE, POSING as Freed, he
organized a campaign to stop the

dredging of the St. Lawrence to open it
to winter shipping. The. community
feared this would destroy the ecology of
the area.
He worked 10 to 15 hours a day,
testified before a congressional com-
mittee, received letters of commen-
dation from Gov. Hugh Carey and was
appointed to a federal water com-
mission.
"That's where my heart is," he said.
"That's where the struggl$ was. That's
where I took the most risks. That was
the meaning of my underground
existence."
AT 43, ABBIE HOFFMAN says he is
a wiser and less impulsive person than
he was six years ago. He is still trying
to cope, with "the controlled
schizophrenia" of living two lives.
"I don't even consider myself Abbie
Hoffman. I consider myself Barry
Freed," he said.
"The woman I love loves some othere
person-she loves Barry. Because of
that, the decision to come back was
more difficult than the decision to
leave."

FOR THE LAST 20 years, Hoffman's
major passions have been Yippie
pranks and community organizing. His
goal now is to train community
organizers like another of his heroes,
the late Saul Alinsky, who ran a school
for political dissidents in Chicago.
"Citizens can get together and they
can win," he said. "They don't have to
be afraid of fighting city hall. The
essence of democracy is a healthy
disrespect for authority and that is not
taught."

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 7, 1980-Page 5
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