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September 06, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Saturday, September 6, 1980-The Michigan Daily

THE
ELEGANT
CITIZEN'
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City teachers
ask for binding
arbitration

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N rS IME QUESTION

By JULIE BROWN
Ann Arbor's public school teachers
continued their strike yesterday, with
no immediate settlement in sight.
Members of the Ann Arbor Education
Association proposed to the city's
school board yesterday afternoon that
the dispute be settled by binding ar-
bitration.
Teachers' association members
voted by a 4-1 margain Tuesday to
remain off the job, primarily for higher
wages. Classes were to begin Wed-
nesday, with teachers reporting for
work Tuesday.
Ann Arbor Superintendent of Schools
Harry Howard said at a press con-
ference early yesterday evening, "I
don't anticipate any change in the
position. We stand ready to negotiate at-
any hour of the day or night, over the
weekend, to resolve this issue."
ACCORDING TO AAEA President
Richard Taylor, negotiations between
the teachers' association and the school
board ended at approximately 6:40
p.m. yesterday, with no negotiations
scheduled for today. Both sides met
yesterday with a mediator from the
Michigan Employment Relations
Commission.
The school board has offered the
teachers a proposed salary schedule
which would include raises varying
from 9 to 15.2 per cent, based on length
of teaching and academic degrees. The
board and the teachers' association
disagree on whether annual incremen-
tal increases-granted as teachers ac-
cumulate teaching experience in the
district-should be included in salary
schedule figures.
Other issues divide the school board
and the teachers' association, including
elementary school classroom size,
layoff procedures, assignment of
homerooms to intermediate school
teachers, racial composition of the
staff, and teacher transfers.
At 11:35 a.m. yesterday, AAEA
proposed to the school board that
agreement be made on several non-
salary issues - racial composition,'
class size, and involuntary teacher
transfer. The board responded verbally
at approximately 1 p.m. that they were
in agreement on those issues, but said
salary negotiations must continue.
IN THE AFTERNOON, AAEA
proposed that no salary would be
negotiated at the school board's level.
AAEA later submitted a proposal that
all unresolved issues be submitted to
binding arbitration. Teachers would
return to work on Monday, provided
that the following conditions, among

others, be met:
*no retribution would be made again-
st AAEA members;
ethe arbitration panel will be selected
in accordance with procedures
established by the American Ar-
bitration Association;
efive persons shall represent each
side;
-both parties agree to be bound by
arbitration;
earbitration fees shall be shared
equally by the parties; and,
eall arbitration hearings shall be
closed to the public.
, Howard said binding arbitration is
not desirable at this time. He noted that
94 per cent of the school system's
budget comes from local taxes, and
said arbitration by an outside party
would deny taxpayers representation
by elected officials.
"I'd like to reaffirm again that they
(the school board) are elected to those
positions by the people," he said.
According to Taylor, the board had
not indicated any answer to the
proposal last night at 8 p.m.
"If they would propose to continue
negotiations, we certainly would," he
said.

'

Daily Photo by MAUREEN OMALLEY
MARY KELLY, a striking Ann Arbor school teacher, brings her dog Marcie
along during a protest yesterday afternoon.

Egyptian sources claim

-

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summit date has

l

From the Associated Press
Authoritative Egyptian sources said
yesterday a U.S.-Israeli-Egyptian
summit meeting will be held in
Washington Nov. 20, but the White
House and the State Department denied
a date had been set.
The summit proposal emerged
during U.S. envoy Sol Linowitz' suc-
cessful Mideast mission to break up a
deadlock on Palestinian autonomy
talks. All three parties have expressed
interest in holding the summit, but the
United States insists a date has not been
set.
LINOWITZ, RETURNING to
Washington, said "there is a reason for
hope" in the upcoming autonomy talks
and that both Israel and Egypt had
made a commitment to the Camp
David peace accords.
The Egyptian sources, who declined
to be identified said the United States
proposed the three leaders get together
16 days after the election to try to con-
clude th~e deadlocked negotiations on a
plan for autonomy for the 1.2 million
Palestinians in territories Israel cap-
tured in the 1967 war. The sources said

Begin and Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat agreed to the date.
In Washington, President Carter's
press secretary Jody Powell said "no
date has been set" for a Mideast sum-
mit, and he was not aware of any dates
being discussed.
ISRAELI PRIME MINISTER
Menachem Begin, who is to be in the
United States on a private visit shortly
after the U.S. presidential elections,
has accepted an invitation from
President Carter to private talks at that
time.
State Department spokesman John
Trattner told reporters, "I think you
should separate the private visit in your
minds from the summit... 'A date for a
summit, as far as I understand it, has
not been set."
Linowitz' Mideast mission had been
regarded as a nearly hopeless attempt
to restart autonomy negotiations that
Sadat had broken off a month before to
protest Israel's new Jerusalem law.
In a surprise announcement Wed-
nesday the U.S. envoy said Israel and
Egypt had agreed to resume the talks

within a few weeks and to hold a sum-
mit meeting with Carter after the U.S.
election.
The suspension came after the Israeli
parliament adopted a controversial law
declaring unified Jerusalem the eternal'
capital of the Jewish state. Sadat com-d
plained that the law blocked his plans,
for Israeli-Egyptian negotiations even-
tually on the future of predominantly
Arab East Jerusalem, which Israel an-
nexed after capturing it from Jordan in,
the 1967 Arab-Israeli war.
Linowitz, in a brief news conference
at Andrews Air Force Base, said the
Egyptian and Israel leaders have made,
a new commitment for peace.
Asked when the negotiations would,
take place, Linowitz replied that it
would be before the end of the year, but,
he gave no specific date.
Rebel bishops from throughout
Cristendom assembled in Pisa, Italy, in
1409 to settle the politico-religious crisis;
of the two popes, at Rome and Avignon,:
The assembly repudiated both.

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995-1717

309 S. State

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