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September 05, 1980 - Image 150

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-05

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Lra ation Procedures
PLNNNG TO GRADUATE1N MAY98?
Students are encouraged to submit their Diploma Application
and Senior Concentration Release Form (AB/BS Candidates) or
BGS Check Form (BGS Candidates) the term preceding the
one in which graduation is expected.

Page 16-A-Friday, September5, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Local Democrats face
sparse Union crowd

Financial aid bill

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May 1981 Graduates should s
the following place and time:
TO: 1221 Angell Hall
BY: FRIDAY, NOV. 14,
FRIDAY, FEB. b
MONDAY, APRIL 20

submit Graduation Materials at
Materials submitted by this date will be
auditied and the results mailed to the
students before the end of the Drop/
Add period in January 1981.
DUE DATE FOR ALL GRADUATION
MATERIALS.
This will ensure that your name appears
on the TENTATIVE DEGREE LIST and in
the COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM.
LAST DAY TO SUBMIT GRADUATION
MATERIALS..

1U
THIS IS ONLY 25%
OF OVER 150 MENU ITEMS
TO CHOOSE FROM
24 HOURS A DAY
AT THE NewPntree Resurant
Breakfasts
Breakfasts are available every hour of the day
Egg dishes are cooked in pans and served with
hash browns and toast or muffins
Eggs American - two eggs any style . 1.45
with a generous portion of ham, bacon, sausage or beef . .. 2.65
Eggs Rancheros - crisply fried tortilla layered with refried beans, two sunny-side up
eggs. our tangy Spanish sauce and cheddar cheese . .. only 2.95
Eggs Lorraine - two poached eggs covered with sour cream and mushroom sauce on
Swiss cheese. Canadian bacon. English muffin ... 4.50 1/2 order . . . 3.50
Eggs Benedict - two poached eggs on Canadian bacon and an English muffin, covered
with our delicious Hollandaise sauce . .. 4.50 1/2 order . . . 3.50
Eggs New Orleans - A distinctive combination of delicate crabmeat and two
poached eggs on an English muffin, accented with Hollandaise
sauce . .. 5.25 ' 1/2 order . . . 4.25
Swiss Omelette - a perfect balance of mushrooms and cheese sauce with
fresh fruit . . . 3.10
Copenhagen Omelette - an original version of a great delicacy. Avocados, turkey and
Swiss cheese, blended with eggs and served with fresh fruit . . . 3.50
Pantree Omelette - this healthy food omelette combines fresh eggs. zucchini, eggplant
and other vegetables. Served with fresh fruit . . . 2.95
Omelette Deluxe - an extraordinary Denver omelette combining ham, bell peppers,
onions, Spanish sauce and American cheese garnished with fresh fruit . . . 3.50
Ham and CheeseOmelette = chunks of ham and American cheese.
served With fresh fruit . .. 3.25
Sonora Omelette - seasoned chicken with guacamole and sour cream, topped with
Spanish sauce and scallions, and served with fresh fruit , . . 3.50
Light Buttermilk Pancakes.. . 1.25. . . with choice of blueberries, or apple and
cinnamon filling ... 2.15
Pancake Sandwich - an egg cooked any style on top of three buttermilk pancakes,
with bacon or sausage . . . 2.45
French Toast, New Orleans style-deep-fried egg bread dipped in a
spiced batter . . . 2.15 1/2 order . . . . 1.35

By ALISON HIRSCHEL
Speaking to a gathering of fewer than
30 persons last night, Democratic can-
didates for several county positions,
state representative for this district,
and the 2nd District House of Represen-
tatives seat stressed the need to defeat
Republican presidential candidate
Ronald Reagan and to retain a
Democratic majority in Congress.
In her short speech in the Michigan
Union, Kathleen O'Reilly, Democratic
candidate for the Congressional seat
held by Republican Carl Pursell of
Plymouth, said, "Democrats have not
only a serious responsibility but an ex-
citing challenge to bring home to voters
what a Republican majority (in
Congress) would mean to them."
O'Reilly criticized Pursell for 'being
an ineffective spokesman for students
and a wishy-washy representative.
BEFORE RETURNING to this area.
to run for; Congress, O'Reilly was
executive director of the Consumer's
Federation of America in Washington.
O'Reilly said it was a "natual and com-
fortable transition" from her position
with the Consumer's Federation to her
candidacy for Congress.
State Representative Perry Bullard
who is running for reelection echoed
O'Reilly's concerns over the possibility

of a strong Republican showing in
November.
BULLARD ADDED, "It is up to all of
us to do what we can to stop Reagan.'
Bullard favors an increased com-
mitment to solar power. He sponsored a
moratorium on nuclear power and said,,
"I am so incredibly concerned that
Reagan's election will lead to an in-
creased possibility of nuclear war."
Lucien Salyer, Democratic candidate
for Washtenaw County Sheriff, said he
believes the most important issue is
cutting down the response time to
emergency calls. "Even if I have to
ride road patrol and every member of
my staff has to ride road patrol, we'll be
there in a matter of minutes," Salyer
promised is he is eleeted Sheriff.
JAMES MURRAY, candidate for
Washtenaw - County Drain Com-
missioner commented that his op-
ponent "doesn't have a lot of creden-
tials," and cited his own five years of
experience in county government.
Democratic candidate for
Washtenaw County Prosecuting Attor-
ney Betty Schwartz, who at one time
taught at the University School of Law,
said she decided to run after observing
blatant disregard for civil liberties in
this County.

scrapped
WASHINGTON (AP)-A b
authorizing $49.7 billion in aid
higher education over the next fi
years narrowly failed yesterday
win final congressional approval.
The Seante, by a vote of 45-43, tt
ned down the measure that pass
the House a week ago. Later in t
day, an attempt to put the bill up f
another roll call failed by a sing
vote, 44-43. There is a likelihood t
sponsors will try to revive t
legislation again next week. x
THE MEASURE would extend t
government's major high
educationaid programs throu
1985.
It makes important changes
various aid programs, mainlyi
creasing ceilings on grants a
loans and raising some inter(
rates on education loans by one p
centage point.
Opponents of the bill were unha
py that Senate members of a HOW
Senate conference. committee h
bowed to the wishes of the House
many points in dispute between t
two chambers.
SOME SENATORS were up.
over the elimination of proposalsf
stricter controls to recoveri
money on government-back

bySenate
bill student loans.
to The bill would increase the
ve maximum grant under the Basic,
to Educational Opportunity Grant
program from $1,800 to $1,900 for the
ur- 1981-82 school year, rising in annual
ed steps to $2,600 by 1985-86.
he Maximum loans under the
for Guaranteed Student Loan Program
gle would go from $2,500 to $3,000 with
he aggregate limits of $12,500 for un-
he dergraduate students and $25,000 for
graduate students.
he INTEREST RATES under the
ier student loan program for new loans
Igh would increase from 7 per cent to 8
per cent. A new parent un-
in dergraduate loan program would
in- allow parents to borrow up to $3,000
nd per dependent student at 8 per cent
est interest.
er- Under the National Student Direct
Loan Program, aggregate minimum
ap- loan amounts would go from $10,000
xe- to $12,000 for graduate or
iad professional students; from $5,000to.
on $6,000 for those who have completed
the two years of undergraduate study
and from $2,500 to $3,000 for all other
met students.
for Interest rates for the direct loan
ng program would increase from 3 per
ed cent to 4 per cent for new loans.

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"now

Dry cereal...,
Fresh-baked muffins........
Toast ....................
English muffin.
Garlic toast.. . . . . . . .
Ham or Canadiar Bacon.
Bacon 14rashers)..........
Sausage (4 links),. .........
Jumbo Baked Potato-avail
O No substihuadn pleas
PaoTree Specialty

A la Carte s.t..4
75 6 oz choice steak......... ... .....4.50
751 One egg (any style)l.............70'
.45 Twoeggs (any style).................
Hashbrown potatoes..................65
..60 with cheese .....................85
1.75 French fries.........................5
.,.. 1.45 Potato salad ........................ 75
1.45 Cottage cheese....................75
able 5 p.m.-10 p.m . . 1.25 Melon-in season. 1.50

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* 5
cords &
denim
boot cut,
straights.

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$5\
Bo i u u nn' \

Frosh
discover
dorm rites
Continued from Page 3)
"I can't wait to get my loft straight
I can worry about everything else,
said one student.
In contrast to incoming freshpersons,
many of the students returning to the
campus seemed less excited about their
revitalization of campus life. "I'm
looking forward to Christmas
vacation," said sophomore Anthony So.
And probably the hardest people to
surprise on campus this time of year
are dormitory maintenance worke
like Ernie Campville.
"I'm anticipating a few fire ex-
tinguisher water fights and sinks off the
walls," Campville said unen-
thusiastically.
The U.S. imported more' meat-
nearly 1.38 million metric tons-than
any other country in 1979, according to
the Department of Agriculture.

A

Pan~ tee

* " 'minimum per person " No
separate checks between midnight
and six a n
" We do not accept personal checks

Hours: Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat.,

el

10:00-5:30; Thur. & Fri., 10:00-8:00
\' \

330 E. LIBERTY

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