100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 05, 1980 - Image 143

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 5, 1980-Page 9-A
Cit teachers out for better pa

By JULIE BROWN
Ann Arbor's public school teachers
remained off the job yesterday, the
esult of a 4-1 strike vote Tuesday by
members of the Ann Arbor Education
Association to strike for higher wages.
Classes were to begin Wednesday,
with teachers reporting for work
Tuesday.
According to Dan Burroughs, a
spokesman for the teachers'
association, 680 members voted in
favor of the work stoppage and 181
voted against the proposal.
ROBERT MOSELEY, assistant
superintendent of the Ann Arbor school
district, said both sides are scheduled
to meet tomorrow morning with a
mediator from the Michigan Em-
ployment Relations Commission. The
mediator may make recommendations,
but these would not be binding on either
side, he said.
Wendy Barhydt, president of the Ann
Arbor Board of Education, said the
school tbard has offered the union a
12.1 per cent wage increase. Burroughs
aid the group is seeking a 16.8 per cent
wage increase spread across the
salary schedule rather than concen-
trated at the top.
"Generally, in this school district we
have had a 10- to 12-step (salary)
schedule," Burroughs explained. "A

step means a teacher moves from one
pay level to the next with each year of
teaching (in the district)."
ACCORDING TO Barhydt, the school
board offer would provide different
salary increases for teachers with dif-
ferent levels of experience. Under the
board offer, which includes experience
levels beyond the twelfth year of
teaching, teachers would receive wage
increases varying from 9 per cent ot
15.2 per cent, based on length of
teaching and academic degrees.
Other issues also divide the teachers
and the school board, including
classroom size, layoff procedures, and
the assignment of homerooms to inter-
mediate school teachers.
"At the intermediate schools, the
board would like to give a sixth assign-
ment called homeroom," Burroughs
said. "That's quite an addition in
workload as far as we're concerned,,"
he added, noting the homeroom's fun-
ction has not been well-defined.
ACCORDING TO school board
president Barhydt, the board reached
an agreement with the teachers'
association two years ago to implement
a homeroom system. The agreement
was unsigned and thus unenforceable,
she said. The school board, she added,
agreed to a 25-minute cut in the inter-
mediate school day.(since implemen-

ted) in exchange for the homeroom
agreement.
"The attempt is to have kids not lost
in the intermediate schools," Barhydt
said. In that sense it is an extra
assignment, she added, but not suf-
ficient to merit widespread dissent.
The present agreement mandates
that class size shall not exceed 30
students, Burroughs said. He added the
administration should make an effort
not to overload classrooms, and also
should assign only 26 students to
classrooms when planning class size in
the spring in order to accommodate
new students moving into the district.
"CLASS SIZE is something that's
impossible to disagree with," Barhydt
said. "They (the teachers' association)
want us to budget four (students) below
the maximum in the spring."
The teachers' association is also op-
posed to the use of race as a criterion
for teacher transfer within the school
system, Burroughs said. "A teacher
could end up getting shuffled around
indiscriminately in that kind of
system," he said.
In 1972, 13.2 per cent of the district's
teachers belonged to minority groups,
Barhydt said. Under the current
agreement, this percentage would be
maintained in the event of teacher
layoffs. The teachers' association
would like to see the figure increased to
In 1970, just over 18 per cent of the
paper consumed by paper mills and
manufacturers was wastepaper.
Today, it is about 20 per cent.

14.5 per cent, while the board favors the
present figure, she said.
THE SCHOOL BOARD also seeks the
right to use teacher qualification, based
on program need, in determining layof-
fs. Under the current system, a teacher
with greater seniority would be kept
over a less-experienced teacher who
may have other qualifications.
According to Burroughs, the
teachers' association is concerned over
the definition of qualification, and the
question of who will evaluate such
qualifications.
Approximately 1,056 teachers are out
on strike, Burroughs said. The last
teacher strike in Ann Arbor was in 1974.
Ann Arbor teachers were among
some 4,300 teachers in 23 Michigan
school districts striking yesterday,
providing an extended summer
vacation for nearly 86,000 students.

MISATOMISATOMISATOMISATOMISATOMISATOMISATOMISAIOMISATOMISATOMISATOMISATOMISATOMI
For the Finest in
Japanese Food; at an
Affordable Price, try Misato
You Won't Have to Beg in
0
e StreetstoEatwit s
oJapanse Restaurant
a 1321 S. University
_ Downstairs at the Village Bell
: Tel: 665-6918
Rvsiwoivsiwoivsiwo.VSIWOivsiWoivsIwoIvsIwoivsiWoivsiwoivsIwoivsIwoivsiwoIvsiw-4

Not to worry....
Discount Course Books

Bursiey residents

protest N.

Camp us

bus hour reductions

(Continued from Page 1)
-but rather to bars.,
Apcording to Gold, Sunstad, who was
Pnavailable for comment, said it was
not the University's responsibility to
providea "bar bus" for students.
But Breakstone noted that "just to
cut (the bus service) out eliminates
these people's (Bursley residents')
need to go to the library, and that's a
realissue."
GOLD AGREED WITH Breakstone's
assessment. "It's a fact that drinking is
a part of this University," he said, ad-
ing that by cutting back on the bus
ours, the University was depriving
him and other North Campus residents
of, access, to academic, cultural, and
social life in Ann Arbor.
But Brinkerhoff also maintained that
operating the late night-early morning
buses - was not economical. He ex-
plained that the University budget
allowed for an eight per cent increase in
costs for operating the buses, but the
cost was greater than anticipated.
He explained that during the normal
*us service hours, it costs 20 cents per
person to run the buses, and 70 cents
per person during the extended hours.
He added that operating the buses
during the late hours cost $11,000 per
year.
"Something had to be given up," he
said.
BRINKERHOFF SAID he recom-
mended to Gold that the students come
up with alternatives to the cutbacks
hich would be given "serious con-

sideration" by the executive officers.
Also, he said, "In the event they are
unable to come up with recommen-
dations, the issue could go to (Vice
President for Student Services) Henry
Johnson to reevaluate the priorities."
He said Johnson could finance the ser-
vice out of "student program funds."
But Johnson said yesterday he has
neither the funds nor the -power to
reverse the executive officers' decision.
"The bus service is a University ser-
vice administered from Mr.
Brinkerhoff's office," said Johnson.
"The question of reevaluation would
fall on his shoulders."
NEW PRODUCTS
.WILMINGTON, Del. (AP)-A fear
of failure causes many business owners
to drag their feet in getting a new
product to market, according to the
President's Letter, a publication for
chief executives.
The journal says there is a
widespread impression that up to 90 per
cent of the new products introduced are
flops. However, it reports that only one-
third of the products actually in-
troduced in the past five years have
failed.
The main reasons a*new product
fails, it says, are inadequte market
research and blunders in timing the in-
troduction of a product.

THE SUMMER'S No. 1 W
OF MOUTH MOYIEf/
HAS NOW5EoO~
HA O EOTHE MOST
IAMEOU4

- --
}

MOVIE IN
ANN ARBOR

If they've really got w
it takes, it's going to t
everything they've g

ORD
WE
hat
ake
;ot.
1LMI

5% Off list
prices on all
New course
b .

(.,......., ,,, E,,, "I r , .E E . 11...

Books for

1

JUUU1 S ...... .
OORS** * *N. Campus
25-50% Off available
list prices o only at our
Use s .Camnpus
UseOCKS.... o m on s
-15% and

all

taught on

more offt t
list prices Yrob an
on brand
name Art
Photographic
supplies.

di(,. E'irytj;~ .r"I"a < : ..I1.. r.. < i .Il.o...h..
+F ' w.. .rrr .l..rr allrr.rr., al". :r.ll",..la I..... il.. .(. r..
^ "."...i.". "Ir .,,,il. ."t..rl.. ..Ilrair.. "il.."" .Ir.. ..i.
..I.. lli rl 1,
"Ii ,
.., , . .. ilii. 1, aii. rall.r".I<I rrr <
.....1.,...I..".rilr ..I..r 1,..r1 1 a lt.. ,11, ~
.rir. ali"I i I i . I II r ..< 1 ")
r.r al. .I.... "Ilr.rrrlr air x .11....1.
..r...ir.. .,I. r"".II. ..l.,,i.. ..II rla..
rrr. il " "I""ri alirr.r"I.alr"
I".r.r.l".. .,1r i."rll. ."ir"Irr
..1.. 111 ir.r I (rr ".....rl""
r"II."r ."tr .I Irr rr.. ..I"r

courses

.OU R REGU A RFALL
HOURS
3i -BEG IN ON
SE PT.2
MONDAY THROUGH
THURSDAY 9-5:30
SATURDAY 9-1

SINCE 1876
Bass Shoes fit
lyourstyes

MGM United Artists

1

Are our Specialty!

rr
K

Saint Mary's Student Chapel
331 Thompson Street 0 Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

SAINT MARY'S MISSION STATEMENT

Saint Mary's is a predominantly student community of Christians at the University of Michigan.
We seek to live the Christian life through worship, study, celebration, service, and bearing
witness. We acknowledge the dynamic Tradition of our faith and seek to enrich this Tradition
in our constantly changing community. Therefore, our primary responsibility is to foster Chris-
tian maturity by taking risks and providing nurturing support and challenge.

When you go from a day at the desk to a
night on the town you need shoes that go
with you. That's why Boss fashions are
designed to fit your life-style. Soft
leathers make them hard to resist.
And Bass craftsmanship makes
them easy to wear all
through the day. Or night.

Sunday Mass Schi
7:30
9:00
10:30 upstairs
911 A - . - . I-

edule

Pastoral Team-
Fr. Frank Cambria, O.P.
Fr. Nick Hubble, C.P.
Fr. Robert T. Kerr

Address: 331 Thompson
Phone: 663-0557
F:a'c

I~ AN A . I

I inrrv V'ta .1 11-L - I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan