100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Friday, December 12, 1980-The Michigan Daily
BUT DON'T COUNT ON A BIRD'S EYE-VIEW'

' Rose Parade:

By ALAN FANGER I
The Southern California sun rises at around 6:30
a.m. early in the month of January, and sends pulses
of warmth through the bodies of thousands of parade-
hungry atrons who have camped-for as many as
three nights-along the sidewalks lining Orange
Grove and Colorado Boulevards. It marks the begin-
ning of a day that will surely linger in the memories
of the thousands of Michigan fans who will travel
west to see the Wolverines play in the Rose Bowl New
Year's Days
Slightly more than 106,000 fans will pack into the
Rose Bowl Stadium at 2 p.m. PST to watch the
Wolverines square off against Pacific-10 champion
Washington in the 67th annual game in this classic.
On the other hand, 15 times as marly people will line
the steets of downtown Pasadena to see an event that
is 25 years older than the game itself-the 92nd an-
nual Tournament of Roses Parade.
THEY WILL VENTURE into Pasadena along about
Monday-three days in advance of the parade-and
stake their claim to tiny, roped-off plots of land that
separate the sidewalk from the street. They will
bring grills, ground cloths, blankets, frisbees, picnic
baskets, and just about anything that will keep them
reliably warm.and entertained for the next 72 hours.
The sidewalk :population should remain fairly
stable until Wednesday afternoon, when all the
perennial one-night campers will arrive and occupy
the grassy knolls immediately behind the sidewalk.
When the overnighters are packed in and ready to
celebrate the new year in the dark, their population

shall have swelled to nearly half a million.
The bottle rockets and firecrackers will sound
vociferously two times during the festive evening. At
9 p.m. PST, Wolverine fans will show fervent
allegiance to their homeland and celebrate
simultaneously with their friends back in-the snowy
Midwest. Then at midnight (3 a.m. EST), the West
Coast contingent will pop the corks and make mirth
as 1981imakes its grand debut.
WHEN DAYBREAK ARRIVES, the tour buses and
automobiles will clog the freeways surrounding
Pasadena, creating havoc for the paradegoers who
desire a decent view of the street-wise happenings.
Some once-eager voyeurs will dall it quits, return
home, and watch the parade on television. Others will
remain merely in earshot of it.
By 8:30 a.m., the floats \vill have taken on their
riders, band instruments will have been tuned, and
the horses will have been groomed in meticulous
fashion. The cameras will be aimed at the large
grandstand on Orange Grove Blvd., just two blocks
south of Colorado Blvd., and ready to transmit pic-
tures to the CBS and NBC networks.
Moments later, the Tournament of Roses Parade,
with actor Lorne Greene ("Bonanza," "Battlestar
Galactica") as Grand Marshal, will begin a 5/2-mile
trip that will wind its way along the streets of
Pasadena to its conclusion at Victory Park, just south
of the Rose Bowl. The Parade should last roughly two
hours.
THE THEME for this year's parade is "The Great
Outdoors." Moving at a precise, 2 -mile per hour

Everybody
pace, it will feature 61 floats, 23 marching bands (In-
cluding both the Michigan and Washington bands),
and 250 equestrians. The parade is expected to draw
125 million viewers from around the world.
The Tournament of Roses Committee, which coor-
dinates the New Year's Day activities in Pasadena,
several years ago established minimum requiremen-
ts for the number of roses that must be attached to
each float. Most floats today sport tens of thousands
of red and pink roses, along with chrysanthemums,
carnations, and other flowers that are commonly
called "annuals."
If you are planning to attend the parade but have
not yet purchased a ticket, your best bet may be an
advance arrival and subsequent overnight campout
along the street. Nearly all grandstand seats were
sold months in advance, and Los Angeles-based tours
that include a parade ticket among their package
deals are usually not worth the offered price.
Arriving at the parade one or two hours before it
begins does ensure one of a bird's-eye view.
One final piece of advice: bundle up. Pasadena's
higher elevation makes it vulnerable to chilly nights.
Overnight lows range from the low to mid 40s, while
the mercury should hover around the 50-degree mark
at parade time.
The weather at game time? If it holds true to
form-as has been the case for the past five
years-skies should be sunny, and with a light breeze
blowing off the San Gabriel Mountains, the tem-
nerature should be 65-70 degrees.

loves it

4

The most famous of all the holiday parades, the Pasadena Tournament of
Roses, featured both of these floats two years ago when the Wolverines last
made the trip to the Rose Bowl. The Rose pageant started in 1890, 12 years
before they added football to the day's events as'just a sideshow.

Bo in search of biggest victory

I

x

Date
9/13
9/20
9/27
10/4
10/11
10/18
10/25
11/,8
11115
11/15
11/22

2
2

MICHIG"AN'.
I -,Opp. Att
7 Northwestern 10 10
7 at NOTRE DAME 29 5

tend.
D0,824
9,075

Mr v " a"

14 SOUTH CAROLINA
38 California

27
37
45
35
24

Michigan State'
at Minnesota
Illinois
at Indiana
at Wisconsin

17
13
23
14
14
0
0
0
3

104,213
104,621
105,263
56,289
105,109
52,071
69,560
105,831
88,827

26 Purdue
9 at Ohio State

WASHINGTON

Citizen
Schembechler:
The camera moves past the moonlit
fence, over the mounting landscape
which leads to one dimly lit window
located in the mansion at the top. In-
side, a tight close-up of an anguished
face. The lips move and a raspy
voice painfully and slowly gasps,
"Rose Bowl." It is followed by the
sound of a shattering heart.
This has never really happened,
yet it happens every day. It has to
haunt the man like the living dead.
Winning the Rose Bowl is the one
thing that has separated Bo from
coaching greatness. It is the all
illusive, and the one thing Bo
Schembechler wants more than
anything in his career.
And a great career he has had. At
Michigan, Bo has a 12-year regular
season record of 113-14-3, best in the
nation for that time period. But Bo
has an 0-7 b'owl record, five of those
losses in Pasadena's New Year's
Day classic.M Although Schem-
bechler is still considered one of the
great coaches of the country, think
what his reputation would be had
Michigan won all seven of those bowl
games.
Butit didn't. And the tarnish on
the Wolverines' good silverware, put
out for all to see, has overshadowed
Bo's accomplishments at Michigan.
Make no mistake about it, Bo
Schembechler wants this Rose
Bowl, and he wants it badly. Like
every other year, Maize and Blue-
clad fans feel this is going to be the

Grandstand
View By Stan Babr

year, that their fayorite sons will
breikthe jinx.
Why shouldn't they? This year
things are different. This year is
special. The 1980.Wolverines are the
most balanced TEAM Bo had ever
had.
Schembechler has had teams with
better talent, but never one that
works as well together and gets as
much out of their talent as this
year's squad. In the past, it has been
the story of too many chiefs, not

weather practices before they leave
Ann Arbor.""The team is also
leaving Christmas Day, a week later
than in past years, and staying a
couple-of days past Jan. 1. In past
games it was felt that the team was
out in California too long before the
game and all they could think of was
playing the game and getting back
to Michigan.
The game itself should be a great
one. Michigan should take command
early but they will not be able to turn

Pass interference at midfield.
Stark realization. The Wolverines
are going to lose, just accept the
fact. Michigan is going to lose just
like they have every other year. The
inevitable. You figure God must
have gone to Ohio State, or a Pac-10
school, or his SAT's weren't high
enough to get in.
Michigan-something like that.
Long completion near the 20.
The nightmare begins to haunt Bo
on the sidelines. He feels four in-
visible walls closing in on him and he
can't do anything about it except
hope, pray if he must, bargain for a.
different outcome.
Quarterback Tom Flick scram-
bles to the three yard line.
A pain strikes deep in his heart,
fear of dying in discontent. Fear of
never reaching a fulfilled
career-couldn't win the big one
scratched on his tombstone. Over
250 wins as a coach, but no national
championships, no bowl wins. It is a
sickening feeling.
Final play of the game. The
Huskies need the touchdown. Flick
rolls right ..
Someday far in the future,.
historians will be left to sift through
the estate of the legendary Glenn
'Bo' Schembechler to prepare it for
the local archives. In the search, they
will record hundreds of awards and
other memorabilia and they will
stumble across one comparatively
insignificant championship ring, on
which is inscribed, 'Rose Bowl,
1981.'

Date
9/13
9/20
9/27'
10/4
10/11
10/18
10/25
11/1
11/8
11/15
11/22

W
50
45
10
24
41
27
10
25
45
20
30

Air Force
Northwestern
OREGON
at Oklahoma State
at Oregon State
at Stanford.
NAVY
Arizona State
Arizona
at USC
at Washington State

Opp.
7
7
34

18
6
24
24
0'
22
10
23

Attend.
44,999
49,975
56,282
48,200
33,000
60,066.
41,211
48,000
46,279
55,512
34,557

enough indians. Now, only one man
wears the full-length head dress of
feathers-Bo himself. sI
The Washington Huskies are a
formidable opponent for the tribe.
Some people even call them the
outright champions of the Pac-10,
but those folks fail to see that both
USC and UCLA were playing
without any incentive of going to a
bowl game..
The Wolverines will go into the
game as solid favorites over the
Huskies, just like they were when
the two teams met in the Rose Bowl
three seasons past. But Schem-
bechler's preparation tactics have
changed.
First, the indoor football building
was just completed for those cold

the game into a rout. The Wolverines
just don't go for the jugular vein,
they only playnwhen they have to.
In only one game all Year has
Michigan really put away an op-
ponent early (Indiana) and that was
largely due to the Hoosier quarter-
back giving the game away through
the first quarter. Leave it to the Ohio
States and Purdues to run up the big
scores.
The Wolverines will hang tough
through the second and third quar-
ters but then the Huskies will make a
last charge. Not again, you say to
yourself, not again.
You remind yourself this year is
different. Michigan just has to win,
don't they? How unlucky can one
team be?

LOSSES IN CAPS

And now,somefearlessforecasts...

fIlan Fanger

Stan Bradbury

Mark Mihanovic

A

Finally - a bowl we can look back
on with fond memories.
Michigan, a team that has risen
from the depths of inconsistency and
last-minute despair, is too good and
too geared up to throw it away once

Washington, while amassing some
impressive wins over USC and
Arizona State, needs its strongest of-
fensive effort to date, and some new-
found consistency on defense to hand
the Wolverines and Bo Schem-

In a comparison of Michigan and
Washingtom, the Wolverines have
the better defense, offense and
specialty teams. So then why is the
game in doubt?
One reason is you never know how
a team is going to be able to play af-
. r :nina lpfr nv m fe w aek

State and not been invited to a bowl.
With an 0-7 bowl record (five
Roses, one Orange, one Gator) it
seems like Michigan is cursed. But it
can't go'on forever. The Wolveines
are just bound to slip up one year
and win a bowl game.
This is that vear Thev have a new

There's no doubt about it, the
Michigan Wolverines were
devastating as the Big Ten cam-
paign drew to a close. Three
shutouts and three points to the
Buckeyes lends credence to the
current rumor that defensive coor-
dinator Bill McCartney is a
magician.

team as an overwhelming favorite
should step back and look at a few
Huskie scores. Washington 50, Air
Force 7. Washington 27, Stanford 24.
Washington 25, Arizona State 0. And
Washington 20, USC 10.
This Huskie bunch is far from a
dog, a much stronger club than the
one which knocked Bo off his perch
--XT - .- 1, . of '1,,.

Ad

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan