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December 09, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9

Page 10-Tuesday, December 9, 1980-The Michigan Daily

-Michel
elected
House
minority
leader

WASHINGTON (AP) - House
- Republicans elected Rep. Robert
Michel of Illinois as their leader in the
next Congress and Rep. Trent Lott of
Mississippi to the No. 2 leadership
position.
House Democrats, meanwhile, re-
elected their current leaders, House
Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill of
Massachusetts and Majority Leader
Jim Wright of Texas. And the leader-
ship, in turn, appointed Rep. Thomas
Foley (D-Wash.), as Democratic whip.
Named as chief deputy whip was
Rep. Bill Alexander (D-Ark.). He suc-
ceeds Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.),
who is expected to be the next chairman
of the Ways and Means Committee.
REP. GILLIS Long (D-La.), was
elected chairman of the Democratic
Caucus, succeeding Foley in that
position.

Foley, who will have to give up his
chairmanship of the Agriculture Com-
mittee, will replace Rep. John
Brademas of Indiana as whip.
Brademas was defeated for re-election.
The elections held by the two parties
were in sharp contrast. Republicans
voted on their leadership jobs in open
session. Democrats, however, met
behind closed doors with the first word
on the new leaders coming when they
appeared together for pictures.
Republicans, riding the conservative
tide that swept Ronald Reagan to the
presidency, picked up 33 seats in the
Novemnber elections, cutting the
Democratic margin to 243-192. And with
congressional reapportionment moving
nearly a dozen Democratic seats from
the North to the more conservative Sun
Belt area of the South and West, they
are optimistic about taking control of
the House in 1982.

Soaping spurs
student boycott

Michel
... a Republican reigns

a

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ALBANY, Ga. (AP)-Many black
students boycotted school for a second
day yesterday and hundreds of people
marched on school board offices to
demand that a teacher be fired for
washing a black student's mouth with
soap.
State Rep. John White (D-Albany),
who is heading the protest as well as a
boycott of Albany businesses, said 1,500
blacks were involved in the march.
Reporters at the scene, however, said
about 500 people took part.
THE INCIDENT that sparked the
protest occurred Oct. 8, when teacher
Jean Dozier allegedly had 7-year-old
Sophia Davis wash her mouth out with a
solution of water and liquid detergent
for writing a note containing obscene
language.
Neither Doughtery County school of-
ficials nor White were able to say how
many children remained out of school .
yesterday, but Friday, when the
boycott began, school officials reported
30 percent absenteeism-about twice
the normal rate.
"This soap deal just brought many,
many other injustices to a head," said
White, who added he expected about 500
people, including teachers and studen-
ts, to attend last night's school board
meeting.
PROTESTERS have several deman-

ds, he said, and "most pressing was th4
termination of the teacher who ad-
ministered the soap to the child."
The teacher received a two-day
suspension, but protesters claim the
punishment was insufficient.
White said student groups also were
sent to set up picket lines at six
locations around this southwest
Georgia city of 75,000 people. The
locations, were an insurance company
and bank owned or operated by school
board members, the school -board ad-
ministration building, and three shop-
ping centers.
"THIS THING has been blown com-
pletely out of proportion," school
Superintendent Paul Robertson said
yesterday. "It should have been solved
at the level of teacher and parent, but a
politician got a hold of this and has
blown it sky high."
Robertson said the whole matter has
been taken out of context.
"It was not and is not a racial issue at
all. We're open for discussion at any
time but the mother has flatly refused
to discuss it. I think the politician
(White) is using this child and this in-
cident in promoting himself and his
position," Robertson said.
WHITE SAID that more than six
black teachers had been fired for doing
less and without proof.

I

0

Campus larcenies rise
with holiday season

(Continued from Page 1)
memory chips to a 99 cent can of tuna.
Director of the University Depar-
tment of Safety Walter Stevens said the
recent number of thefts seems to be
higher than usual. "Every year when
we approach the holiday season there is
a surge in the crime of larceny," he
said.
Stevens, who called the property thef-
ts "our major crime on campus," cited
the state's poor economic situation, the
large amount of money being cir-
culated by holiday shoppers, and
student carelessness with personal
property as possible reasons for the
larceny upsurge.
THE SAFETY director said his
department has notified the state police
of the situation and is "pulling all the
extra foot patrol we can" to help com-
bat the problem.
Undergraduate Library Head
Librarian Rose-Grace Faucher blamed
three successful larceny attempts at
the UGLI on student carelessness.
"The main problem here is people
leave their things and walk away," she

explained. Some $300 worth of wallet
and backpack contents were stolen
from the UGLI during the 12-day
period.
"The UGLI, unlike the Graduate4
Library, does not have a security guard
service," Faucher said. "It (security)
might deter somebody. I don't expect
the money for it, though," she added.
Stevens said students living in
residence halls can take advantage of
electric engraving tools provided by the
University Housing Office to identify
their valuables with names and iden-
tification numbers.
West Quad Building Director Leon
West, however, said "maybe two"
students have taken advantage of the
engraving equipment at that building.
West Quad, from which nearly $900
worth of goods-including $700 in stereo
equipment-were stolen during the 12-
day period, has "more security
problems than hill dorms because the
doors are unlocked all day," West ex-
plained. He said he hopes the problem
"will lessen when the holidays are over
with."

NO PAY
til
ON,
HIGHLAND F
CHARGE A

Graduating law students
receive favorable verdict

Sale Wednesday Only. 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.i
THESE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY "12 HOUR SALE" BARGAINS

(Continued from Page 2)
The judge, who has an honorary law
degree from the University, also told
the future attorneys that they must be
careful to ensure equal rights to all,
specifically women and minorities.
"Judges must be aware of injustice as
it occurs daily in our society," he said.
HolidaySpecie I
SOFT AND HARD
CONTACT LENSES $178.50
Includes All Professional Fees
DR. PAUL USIAN,
Optometrist
545 Church Street
764-1222
Offer Expires December 23

KEITH SAID the issue of civil rights
has long been out of the hands of the
legislature and has been placed in the
laps of judges. With this in mind, he
said, tomorrow's judges and lawyers
must not be afraid to tackle the issue
head on, even if it means making an
unpopular decision.
"Fear breeds hatred that leads to
violence," he said. "I hope you will
conquer ignorance and fear and have
the courage to do what's right."
Keith also told the law students they
must look toward history to gain a
proper perspective on inequalities suf-
fered by women and minorities.
"Because racism was at one time the
official policy of the federal gover-
nment, there simply weren't any boot-
straps to pull yourself up on," Keith
said. The judge attacked sexism,
saying, "no intelligent human being
can ignore the great contributions of
women throughout history."

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TECHNICS DOLBY
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4-track, 2-channel stereo record
& playback. Auto-stop. While 180
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Five-band per channel equal-
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IJ

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