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December 09, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Residents object to city
sidewalk assessments

By ELAINE RIDEOUT
City officials say they have learned a lesson from-mistakes
made while carrying out a city-wide sidewalk repair
program approved last February-the first special sidewalk
assessment to be levied in 150 years.
Two Ann Arbor residents objected to the city's special
assessment process at a public hearing last night before City
Council.
"I OBJECT VIOLENTLY to this process," Robert Borer, a
University Hospital physician told Council. Borer was
charged $363.38 for repairs on sidewalks in front of his South
University Street home. He said, "I had not received any
notice prior to construction saying I was to be charged for
it."
Borer added he first became aware, of the special
assessment on Nov. 25 when he received a letter from City
Engineer Leigh Chizek apologizing for the oversight.
"We totally missed his address," Chizek explained, adding
that large volumes of paperwork had complicated the
assessment process.
BRENDA HERMAN, property manager of McKinley
Properties, said her firm was charged $1,345 for sidewalk
repair on Geddes Road after receiving a job estimate of $750
from the city. "I got a bill for $1,350 when I was only planning
on spending $750," Herman told Council.
In addition, she said her firm had notified the city prior to
the construction that they desired to have the repairs made
by a private contractor.
"We granted permission, but another segment of the
engineering department was not aware of it," Chizek ex-
plained.

"THIS IS THE worst mistake we have been able to un-
cover," he added. He said the original estimate for sidewalk
repairs at the McKinley property only covered repairs for 300
square feet. The engineering department later re-calculated
that 570 square feet of walk needed to be replaced at the site.
"To the best of my knowledge, all other people have been
reasonably assessed," Chizek said.
But Borer said he was not sure whether he had been
reasonably assessed. "I never knew which plaques needed to
be replaced. I may have been overcharged without being
aware of it," he said. He suggested that in the future the city
send specifications for proposed sidewalk replacement and
an explanation of the repair program to assessed residents.
COUNCILWOMAN LESLIE MORRIS (D-Second Ward)
said repairs in her neighborhood, seemed to be designated on
an arbitrary basis. "Our inspectors need to use some general
criteria," she said. "On my side, two different repair
programs were going on simultaneously - neither knew of
the other and both cited different squares which needed to be
replaced."
Coluncilman Louis Senunas (R-Fourth Ward) suggested
the city initiate an audit program to insure that recommen-
ded sidewalk repairs are necessary.
In other business, City Attorney Bruce Laidlaw said the
city has settled a lawsuit with the engineering firm of Ayres,
Lewis, Norris & May out of court. The city filed suit against
the firm last January for defective design work on im-
provements to the City Water Treatment Plant.
Laidlaw said the firm has agreed to correct the problems
caused by the design defects at no extra charge to the city. "I
think it is a reasonable settlement," he said.

Police
notes
Thieves take liquid
assets
Maybe they were going to a party.
Thieves kicked in a back door
panel and entered a home in the 2500
block of Parkwood Saturday night,
and then stole 12 bottles of Strohs
*beer, police said yesterday.
Beer was also the goal of thieves
who smashed the window of the Quik
Pik in the 600 block of S. Maple Road,
early Sunday. The robbers got away
with $84 worth of beer, including two,
cases of Miller, two cases of
Heinekin, and a case of Michelob.
Good Samaritan' robs
man
An offer of a ride home turned into
a holdup Saturday night for a Man-
chester resident, police said yester-
day. After striking up a conversation
at the University Hospital emergen-
cy room, a young man offered to
drive the 52-year-old Manchester
resident home. The pair left on the
pretext of walking to the younger
man's car, the victim told police, but
when they reached Fifth Avenue and
Summit Street the good samaritan
stuck a gun in his back and deman-
ded his wallet. After taking $90 the
gunman fled on foot.

r

with psychi
(Continued from Page 1)
"This is an extraordinary experience
and one I have never encountered
before in the whole of my career. There
is certainly no medical explanation or
medical solution to the problem."
WESTBURY SAID the twins are ar-
ticulate and of normal intelligence and
were not suffering from mental illness
but from a "personality disorder."
In addition, a senior psychiatrist who
asked not to be identified said: "Their
total parallel identity, particularly
their constant oneness in speaking,
takes them far beyond any other sets of
identical twins known to psychological
medicine. This must be the nearest
thing the world has ever seen to a daily
unrehearsed dazzling display of
telepathy."
The magistrates deferred sentencing
and said meantime they must stay
away from Iveson. From the dock the
twins replied in unison: "We have lear-
ned our lesson. We have been to prison
and we won't bother him again."
BUT WHEN they appeared Nov. 4,

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, December 9, 1980-Page 3
Twins baffle experts

behavior
eachwearing one pink mitten and one
brown woolen glove, police said they'd
broken their promise by again
following Iveson to work and standing
outside his factory.
BUT OFFICIALS have given some
details of their life, described by York
social worker Jean Oglethorpe as "one
mind in two bodies."
The twins' parents dressed them
identically and encouraged their
closeness to the extent that they
screamed if parted. They lived with
their parents until they were 27, when
they moved x into an apartment in a
hostel run by the York council's social
services department.
SEVERAL YEARS ago they were
sent to different hospitals in a bid to
establish more separate identities.
They refused to eat or talk to doctors,
and arranged secret meetings by
telephone.
'Today they're so plose that they sleep
in a double bed, cook breakfast while
both hold the frying pan handle and use
identical soap.

alEmEd novellas... i

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,,

SLibrary
employee
assaulted

(Continued from Page 1)
but security officers managed to ap-
prehend one man. All property was
recovered from a stairwell, police said.
Capt. Hicks said the incident "ap-
peared to be a strong-armed robbery."
There were no weapons involved in the
assault, he said. '
Police had not yet positively iden-
tified the suspect in custody, but said
the three men were not University
students.

-;l

LECTURE ESTABLISHED
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP)-The
"George Pal Lecture on Fantasy in
Film" has been established in memory
of the science-fiction and fantasy direc-
tor by the Academy Foundation.
The foundation is the educational af-
filiate of the Academy of Motion Pic-
ture Arts and Sciences.
James M. Roberts, executive
secretary of the foundation, says "each
lecture will feature a producer, direc-
tor, writer or other creative person who
will discuss the making of science-fic-
tion or fantasy films.

Don't miss
FACULTY
SALARIES
in WED., DEC. 10
MICHIGAN DAILY

THE ARBOR HOUSE TREASURY OF GREAT
SCIENCE FICTION SHORT NOVELS
compiled by Robert Silverberg and
Martin H. Greenberg
Includes more than a dozen rarely available
works by Isaac Asimov, James Blish, Arthur C.
..----Clarke, Robert A. Heinlein, Damon Knight,
flST Theodore sturgeon, and others. "Treasury
ILISHED Is the right word... holds gems of a high
grade....a natural cornerstone for any SF
collection" (Publishers Weekly). 769 pages.
THE ARBOR HOUSE TREASURY OF
MODERN SCIENCE FICTION
compiled by Robert Silverberg and
Martin H. Greenberg
39 landmark short stories by the brightest stars
in the SF galaxy make this "hefty collection as good
an introduction to contemporary SF as one could
wish" (Publishers Weekly). 754 pages.
To your bookseller or direct to:
' ARBOR HOUSE. 235 E. 45th St., NY 10017,
Please send me:
THE ARBOR HOUSE TREASURY OF GREAT SCIENCE FICTION
SHORT NOVELS
I- copy(ies) 04i $19.95 (deluxe clothbounid library edition)
* copy(ies)1( $9.95, Priam paperback
'THE ARBOR HOUSE TREASURY OF MODERN SCIENCE FICTION*
I-copy(ies) (i $19.95 (deluxe clothbound library edition)
*-copy(ies' (a $8.95, Priam paperback,
Please include $1.50 per book to cover postage and handling.
IBUY BOTH VOLUMES & SAVE $2.00! Deduct from total order
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-HPPENING-
FILMS
CFT-Day for Night, 4, 7, 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Cinema Guild-Requiem for a Heavyweight, (Nelson), 7, 9 p.m., Lorch
Hall Aud.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music-Trombone Students Christmas Concert, noon, Recital
hall.
School of Music-Chamber Messiah, University of Michigan Collegium
Musicum Chorus, Ars Musica Baroque Orchestra, conductor Edward Par-
mentier, soprano Eilna Kirkby, countertenor Rene Jacobs, tenor Marius
von Altena, bass Max von Egmond, 8 p.m., St. Andrew's Episcopal Church.
School of Music-Campus Orchestra, conductor Charles Gabrion, 8 p.m.,
Hill Aud.
School of Music-Jazz Band, conductor Edward Smith, 9 p.m., Rackham.
School of Music-Saxophone Recital, Mario Bernardo, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall.
SPEAKERS
Ann Arbor Public Library-Martin Overhiser, "Ann Arbor in the 1980s:
from Growth to Revitalization and Reuse," 12:10 p.m., Main Library
meeting room.
Chemistry-Coll., David Ballou, "Rapid Kinetic and Structural Studies on
Protocatechuate Dioxygenase: A Nonheme Iron Protein Involved in
Aramatic Ring Degeneration," 4 p.m., 1300 Chem.
Bioengineering-Sem., Hans Berliner, "What We Have Learned from
Computer Games," 4 p.m., 1084 E. Engin.
Dev., Pers., Soc. Psych.-Coll., Douglas Jackson, "Personality and the
Employment Interview," 4 p.m., 6006 ISR Founders' Room.
Geology-Leo Laporte, "Paleoecology of Higher Primate Evolution," 4
p.m., 4001 CCL.
MEETINGS
Academic Women's Caucus-Phyllis Ocker, reports on Title IX review by
Dept. of Ed., noon, 3050 Frieze.
Botticelli Game Players-noon, Dominick's.
Biological Research Review Comm.-4 p.m., 3087 SPH I.
Graduate Employees Org.-8 p.m., Rackham Conf. Room.
Mi. International Relations Society-7 p.m., Union Anderson Room.
U.G. Pol. Sci. Ass'n.-Meeting and election, 7 p.m., Union Kuenzel Room.
W. European Studies-Informational meeting for Summer Programs in
London and Florence, 7 p.m., 3227 Angell.
His House Christian Fellowship-7:30 p.m., League rooms D and E.
HSO-Lesbian/Gay Male Health Professions, 7:30 p.m., 802 Monroe.
MSA-7:30 p.m., Constituents' Time, 9 p.m., 3909 Union.
PIRGIM-Energy Task Force meeting, 7:30 p.m., Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Computing Ctr.-Word Processing Sem., Jim Fry, Jon Reinke, 4 p.m., 1016
Paton Bus. Ad.
Studio Theater-Workshop, Milan Stitt's Playwriting Class, 7 p.m., Frieze
Arena Theater.
UAC-Workshop, Impact Dance, 7 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Rec. Sports-Clinic, "Circuit Training Programs," 7:30 p.m., CCRB small
gym.
TM Program-Intro. lec., 8 p.m., Ann Arbor Public Library Muehlig
Room.
Meekreh-Felafel Chanukah party, 10:30 p.m., Couzens Living Room.
Dratman Theatre Co.-casting for production of Shepard's "The Curse of
the Starving Cross," appointment necessary , Frieze Bldg.
Museum of Art-Exhibition, "From the Winston-Malbin Collection:
Various Media and Formats," Univ. of Michigan Museum of Art.
Alumnae Council-Applications for 1981-82 Scholarships available to un-
dergrad. and grad. women, Alumni Association, Michigan Union.
Washtenaw Comm. Coll.-Registration for winter calsses, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
second floor WCC Student Center Bldg.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109.

Way to Go,
WOLVERINES!

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AFTER THE GAME,
BE SURE TO TOUCH DOWN AT
T'bicnes~lnnAl

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