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January 16, 1981 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-16

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 16, 1981-Page 5
SWEDISH DIPLOMAT SAVED 20,000 JEWS FROM NAZIS
Hero believed alive

STOCKHOLM, Sweden
(AP)-Foreign Minister Ola Ulisten
said yesterday Sweden has never ac-
cepted Soviet declarations that Raoul
Wallenberg, the diplomat credited with
saving 20,000 Jews from Nazi execution
in World War II, died in a Moscow
prison in 1947.
In a statement to an international
hearing on the Wallenberg mystery,
Ullsten said that although the Soviet
Union says Wallenberg died, "the
Swedish government has never accep-
ted this as the final answer in this
case."
The hearing seeks to shed new light
on the fate of Wallenberg, who fell into
the hands of the Red Army in Hungary
in 1945. After denying for 12 years any
knowledge of Wallenberg, the Soviet
Union in 1957 claimed that Wallenberg
had died in a Moscow prison.
BUT THERE HAVE been persistent
reports that Wallenberg was still alive
in the Soviet Union at age 68. In
November, Wallenberg's sister said she
had "recent evidence he is alive and
fairly well."
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In Moscow, the Soviet news agency
Tass called the Stockholm hearings
"provocative" and said "there is and
can be nothing new in this matter."
A Tass commentary on the hearing
said the Soviet government carried out
a thorough investigation and deter-
mined Wallenberg died in 1947. Reports
that he has since been seen alive "were
at variance with reality," Tass said.
Ullsten said that "in the last few
years new information has prompted
the Swedish government on two oc-
casions to direct inquiries to the Soviet
government" in the case.
"The unhelpful Soviet attitude is all
the more unacceptable when we con-

sider the humanitarian mission which
Raoul Wallenberg performed so splen-
didly in saving the lives of thousands
and thousands of human beings from
Nazi concentration camps," Ullsten's
statement said.
The hearing is led by a panel of 28
lawyers, politicians and scientists from
eight Western countries and sponsored
by the Swedish Raoul Wallenberg
Association.
Wallenberg arrived in Budapest in
p944 on a U.S. sponsored mission to save
Jews from the Nazi gas chambers. lie
and his aides managed to save some
20,000 Jews by issuing them special
passports or Swedish papers.

APP noto

MARTIN LUTHER King III places a wreath on his father's grave, while his mother, Coretta Scott King (center), looks
on. The late King would have been 52 yesterday.
Thousands gater for
Kings 52nd birthday

I

From AP and UPI
Tens of thousands of admirers of
Martin Luther King Jr. celebrated the
slain civil rights leader's birthday
yesterday, marching for brotherhood in
snowy Washington, going forward as
"apostles for peace" in Atlanta, and
vastly outnumbering a few neo-Nazis in
Buffalo, N.Y.
A proposal to make King's birthday a
national holiday was introduced in
Congress yesterday-just as it had been
every year since King's death in 1968.
Every year, it has been turned down..
The latest measure was introduced in
the Senate by Sen. Charles Mathias, (R-
Md.), Sen. Edward Kennedy, (D-
Mass.), and eight others.
WHAT WAS BILLED AS a "white
civil rights" rally in Buffalo drew, only
four or five people, one of whom got into
a brief scuffle with counter-demon-.
strators that was quiekly stopped by
police. The Nazi leader was escorted
away, uninjured.
The show of force by 500 anti-Nazi
demonstrators was followed by an of-
ficially-sanctioned memorial that drew.
some 5,080 people to commemorate the,
2nd anniversary of King's birth.
In the nation's capital, marchers
from 30 cities walked Pennsylvania
Avenue from the Capitol to the
Washington Monument, carrying signs
that read: "Let's Make This a Day of
Celebration-Happy Birthday to Mar-
tin Luther King" and "I Have a
bream-March for Peace," a referen-
ce to King's merhorable speech in
Washington.

3

AN ESTIMATED 15,000 people
gathered on the Mall at a rally
organized by pop singer Stevie Wonder
to further King's goal of "unity and
peace and brotherhood." Organizers
said 300 buses brought marchers to
Washington to seek a national holiday
for King, who led historic demon-
strations and protests to call attention
to discrimination against blacks.
Among those bused to Washington
were around 400 residents of Memphis,
where King was assassinated almost 13
years ago. One group, as it climbed
aboard a bus, chanted, "We won't let no
Reagan turn us around. . . We're going
to keep on a'walking, keep on a'talking
till we get this legislation passed."
In another Washington. tribute, hun-
dreds of Justice Department em-
ployees., most of them black, crammed,
the department's "Great Hall" for a
commemorative ceremony. Attorney
General Benjamin Civiletti said King's
name was one of the few in modern
history that served as an immediate
symbol of peace and the betterment of
mankind.
AN ESTIMATED 5,000 people joined
the family of the late Martin Luther
King Jr. in Atlanta in an emotional
ceremony at the slain civil rights
leader's gravesite.
King's widow, Coretta Scott King,
and other family members attended a
rally at an Atlanta high school and then
marched about three miles to place
wreaths at his tomb, ringed by a silent
crowd.

Mrs. King received a standing
ovation at the rally. She told her
audience: "When we march down to the
crypt today, I want you to do it just like
Martin Luther King, Jr. did it. And
when we get to the crypt, we're gonna
be silent and dignified. Let's get serious
...We must let the world know we mean
business."
To keep unbroken egg yolks from
spoiling, store them in a small bowl,
cover them with water and refrigerate
them.

FEBRUARY 18
Tickets are $8.50 reserved and are on sale

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