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January 15, 1981 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-15

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Page 10--Thursday, January 15, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Riegle outlines

auto,
By DAVID SPA
U.S. Sen. Donald Riegl
:alled upon the nation's au
urers and the federal1
yesterday to take "a mor
ole" in the revitalizationw
:ially ailing industry.
The senator said "a busine
pproach. to the auto
problems would be disaster
the old examples ar
nymore." Riegle adde
inuing along the samep
:onsign ourselves to a seca
'ole."
RIEGLE, SPEAKING to
.,300 auto industry represe
guests attending a Japan
lustry forum held in the
Power Center, said co
neasurers must be taken
he problems facing the n
nakers and their employe
Riegle called upon Congr
efundable tax credit law
lividuals and businesses
he current auto industrys
>ack on their feet. "But ev
enough without majorp
>onents" needed to save 1

proposal
K The senator said a new influx of
capital, an improvement in produc-
to manufach. tivity, a spirit of cooperation between
tormanac- labor and management, and a humane
government policy aimed at "the tens of thousands
e aggressive of workers being premanently
of the finan- displaced" by the current industrial
ess as usual,, backslide were necessary parts of any
industry's revitalization package.
inustry'as THE UNEMPLOYED worker
rous because assistance proposal was the most im-
en't useful portant of the group, Riegle said, but he
d that con- added, "We haven't even begun to deal
path "would with that. We have no strategy for
ndary world dealing with the unemployment
problem. It's hard to see advances in
Smore thatesand the near future."
ntatiuts and The senator said another crucial
ese auto in- problem facing the industry is
University's "digesting the transition" from the
tprehensive type of cars being produced today to the
to alleviate downsized cars of the future. "We can't
nation's auto let ourselves bleed to death" during the
es. current transition period, he said.
essto passa Riegle said the starting point in the
b to help i- rebuilding process is the recently
battered by published domestic auto industry
slump to get report released by the U.S. Department
ven that isn't of Transportation earlier this week.
policy com- The report, he said, marks the con-
'he industry, tinuation of a new era of more positive
relations between the government and
the auto industry.
Dealing with the auto industry will be
one of the toughest tasks for the in-
coming Reagan administration, he
said, but it still is not certain which
direction the new administration will
take.

Cabinet
official
challenges*

U.S.

auto

industry
Continued from Page 1)
industrial policy that picks winners and
losers versus marketplace economics."
GOLDSCHMIIT SAID THE debat0
finally must rest on the nation's con-
sideration of self-interest-a self-
interest that refuses to let its industries
suffer in a world market where foreign
competitors have advantages because
of more favorable government
regulations, greater productivity, and
lower wage rates.
Japanese automakers hold a $1,000 to
$1,500 per vehicle comparative advan
tage over U.S. produced cars, after a
2.9 percent import duty, the transp4
tation department study reports.
Suzuki, meanwhile, refused to accept
blame for the U.S. auto industry's
problems.
"JAPANESE manufacturers do not
believe that the current automobile
problem in the U.S. is an issue of impor-
ts versus domestics," the executive
said, "but rather a question of small
cars versus large cars."
In addition.to an import restrain
agreement, the transportation depar-
tment's report on the U.S. auto industry
recommends:
* Revision of tax laws to help the in-
dustry, government reform of
regulation, and antitrust law revisions.
" Wage restraint by unions and adop-
tion of worker incentive plans by in-
dustry management.

. MIDDLE EAST ISSUES, CHURCHES IN THE
USA, AND U.S. NATIONAL POLICY
FRIDAY, JANUARY 16th
at the ECUMENICALCAMPUS CENTER
12 NOON: LUNCHEON DISCUSSION
"ISLAM AND THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD OF THE MIDDLE EAST"
Speaker: Dr. Bryon Haines, Chairman of the Task Force on
Christian Muslim Relations of the National Council
of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.
8 P.M.: "ISLAM AND CHRISTIANITY IN THE MIDDLE EAST WITH PARTICULAR
REFERENCE TO IRAN'
Speaker: Dr. Haines
TUESDAY, JANUARY 20th, 12 Noon
Luncheon Discussion at the international Center
"IRAN, THE GULF, AND THE ISRAELI-ARAB-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT"
Speakers: James and Deborah Fine American Friends Service
Committee Middle East Representatives, based in
Jerusalem.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21st, 12:30
Lunch Discussion at the Ecumenical Campus Center
"CHURCHES IN THE USA AND THE ARAB-ISRAELi-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT"
Speakers: James and Deborah Fine.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8 P.M.
at the Friends Center, 120 Hill St.
b MIDDLE EAST ISSUES--"HOPE IN THE MIDST OFCRISIS"
Speakers: James and Deborah Fine
For further information, call 662-5529

Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ
SEN. DONALD RIEGLE (D-Mich.) outlines a plan to revitalize the ailing auto industry yesterday at the Power Center.
Riegle was speaking as part of the Japanese Automotive Industry public forum.
IRANIANS FREE TO NEGO TIM TE:
Parlia-ment approves bill1

From AP and UPI
Iran's Parliament empowered the government yesterday to
conclude negotiations with the United States to free the 52
American hostages in exchange for about $6.6 billion in
frozen Iranian assets. Iran's chief negotiator said they could
be freed in "two or three days."
State Department officials, however, jaded by past disap-
pointments during the 438-day-old crisis cautioned against
optimism, saying "serious differences" remained between
the hostages and their homecoming.
"WE REALLY CAN'T evaluate it except that it seems a
step in the right direction," said John Trattner, the State
Department spokesman. "We still have the same fundamen-
tal questions that remain unresolved."
Asked if release of the hostages was imminent, the
spokesman said "we still have differences. -I can't talk of
imminence unless and until those problems are resolved."
The Carter administration expects a prompt reply from
Iran on terms for freeing the hostages now that the Majlis
has approved arbitration of financial and legal problems by a

neutral country, a senior official said yesterday.
"THIS DOESN'T tell us what their final position would be,"-
the official said. "What we expect is that in a day or so,
sooner rather than later, they will come to us with a reply.
Let's hope it is something close to what we can accept and
we'll get a deal."
During a five-hour debate, Parliament heard Behzad
Nabavi, the government's chief hostage negotiator, proclaim
Iran had "rubbed the nose of this great Satan to the ground"
and could now proceed to a quick resolution of the crisis.
"We want to settle the hostage issue within the next two or
three days, either by a settlement and release or by trial,"
Nabavi said.
After speculation that hardliners were trying to delay its
session, Parliament met and passed a bill allowing the
government to accept a U.S. proposal to put the question of
Iran's disputed assets to international arbitration. The $6.6
billion represents the amount of assets that it is estimated the
United States would return.

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monogamous
mating to
evolution
TORONTO (UPI)-We may be what
we are because our apelike ancestors
changed their behavior millions of
years ago and began monogamous
mating.
That's the far-reaching and
somewhat controversial hypothesis of
Dr. C. Owen Lovejoy, a professor of
anatomy and anthropology at Kent
State University in Kent, Ohio.
He suggests the switch from multipO
mates to only one for a lifetime sparked
the development of upright walking so
males could search for food and allow
the female to care for and protect their
children. Bipedal walking was required
to free the arms to carry food.
LOVEJOY'S IDEAS, to be published
soon in the prestigious scientific journal
Science, were outlined at a daylong
American Association for the Adva
cement of Science symposium on t
latest developments on the study of
early man.
He said when the female was able to
protect her offspring, the young had a
higher chance of living to reproductive
age. This improved chances for sur-
vival of the species and led to the
development of greater intelligence.
A long childhood is needed so the
brain can develop and the young can
learn the ways of their elders.
LOVEJOY SAID since the female did
not need to be as mobile as the food-
hunting male, she was smaller and not
as strong physically.
Monogamous mating also removed
males from antagonistic situations and
made it possible for them to cooperate
with each other in groups, he said.
"This reproductive strategy of
monogamy pair bonding, in fact an an-
cient form of the human family, was t
first major advance above the kind of
social structure that we see in the
apes," he said.
"FOLLOWING THE adoption of this
mating strategy is when we begin to see
an increase in intelligence and
development of stone tool culture which
become the later hallmarks of the
human lineage."
The evidence supporting Lovejoy's
ideas come from a remarkable series of
fossil remains of 35 individuals found
Africa by a research team led by Dr.
Carl Johanson of the Cleveland
Museum of Natural History. Recent
laboratory studies have placed the age
of the fossils at 3.5 million years.
The bones of one individual, named
Lucy, proved these creatures of the
newly named species Australopithecus
afarensis were upright walkers.
However, their brains were about the
same size as modern apes.

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This simple
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We have free
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