100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 12, 1981 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Youth protests
distress West

The Michigan Dily-Sunday, April 12, 1981-Page 7
'U'continues long
tradition with NASA-

German
BONN, West Germany (AP) - Night
'after night, West German television is
ablaze with pictures of burning street
barricades, photos of youths taunting
officials and white-helmeted police fen-
ding off stones or Molotov cocktails
with clear plastic riot shields.
Whether it is a march against nuclear
energy, military draft, or in support for
the illegal takeover of abandoned
housing, thousands of young West
Germans are demonstrating as easily
as their parents stroll to the cafe for
pastry on Sunday afternoons.
THEIR SLOGANS are simple: "No
power to no one," "Germany is sick,"
or another favorite, "Zorn" (Anger),
spray-painted on posters and walls.
But sometimes the demonstrations
turn to violence reminiscent of the
1960s as a new generation defies the
consumer values of West Germany's
wealthy, postwar establishment.
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, whose
left-liberal government has been deeply
embarrassed by the resurgence of
youth violence, has warned against
"throwing all protestors into the same
pot.''
BUT THE PREMIER of Bavaria,
Franz Josef Strauss, West Germany's
leading conservative and a sharp critic
of Schmidt, claims the demonstrators
represent "seeds of a new terrorist
movement."
The upsurge in youth violence began
about six months ago when police
clashed with young people occupying
empty buildings in West Berlin and
other major cities, where low-cost
housing is hard to find.
Although government studies show a

officials
million people throughout the country
are in need of better housing, some
100,000 apartments stand empty as
owners speculate on the real estate
market.
THE ISSUE PITTED value against
value the right of an owner to manage
his property as he wished against the
right of citizens to an affordable place
to live. '
West Berlin's squatters set off
similar movements elsewhere in the
country - even down to a group of six
elderly women who took over a house in
the Ruhr city of Gelsenkirchen. The
oldest member of the group is 94.
After a demonstration in Nuremberg
during which six windows were shat-
tered, police encircled a youth center
and arrested 141 people, including
children of several prominent
politicians and local leaders.
MANY OF THE youths claimed to
have never taken part in the demon-
stration, but all were held in jail for
periods of a few days or in some cases
several weeks.
It was the largest single mass arrest
since the Nazi era and raised cries of a
return to a police state. In a rare move,
a judge of the West German Supreme
Court condemned the arrests as a
danger to indiviual rights.
West Berlin officials admit many of
the squatters are not pampered studen-
ts, but out-of-work teen-agers who are
unable to match the idealsset out by the
West German economic wonder. One-
third of all jobless in West Germany are
under 25, according to government
statistics.

(Continued from Page 1)
is a course offered for students who
want to design an experiment to go up
in the shuttle.
The class is an ongoing project, ex-
plained Prof. Fred Bartman. This
semester's class is working on
preliminary designs of an experiment.
The next class will start putting the ex-
periment together and the following
classes will refine the experiment, Bar-
tman said.
THE CLASS HAS decided on an ex-
periment suggested by
oceanographers-to discover how great
a role gravity plays in the coagulation
of larger particles from sediments,
Bartman said.
Future experiments may include a
study of the heat conductivity of gases
and research on the growth of cancer

cells outside the influence of the ac-
celeration of gravity.
Bartman said the class acts as unit,
electing a manager and dividing up
tasks. The enthusiasm then takes over
and "after midsemester I just become
an adviser," said Bartman.
The earliest possible date for the ex-
periment to go in orbit is Sept. 1982,
Bartman said, although no actual
scheduling has been done yet by NASA.
According to Buning, anyone will be
able to buy cargo spaces in the shuttle
for approximately $3,000 for a two-and-
a-half cubic foot space.
This well mean everyone-including
high schools, private companies, and
even heads of state-can reap the
benefits of the shuttle, said Buning.
"It really brings it down to earth," he
added.

"Gimme a D
Gimme an A
Gimme an1 ... L ...Y
Givb the MICHIGAN DAILY
that old college try.*
CALL 764-0558 to order your subscription
ATTENTION-
ALL RECIPIENTS OF
Please return your survey response
as soon as possible.

AP Photo
THE SPACE SHUTTLE Columbia sits on liftoff pad 39-A at the Kennedy
Space Center in Florida awaiting a possible liftoff today. Asjronauts Robert
Crippen and John Young, meanwhile,- continued their training routines
yesterday in preparation for the flight.
U.S. apologizes for
accidentally sinkingq

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

--4

6 Bdr. House 715 Arch, $110/rm. Negotiable. Sublet
May thru August. Free case of beer for each sublet-
ter. 763-2667. 21U0412
Cheap-Two bedroom furnished apartment close to
campus. A/C, electricity, parking and disposal. Call
665-3519. dU0413
Park Terrace Apartments, May through August. 3
bedrooms, underground parking, air conditioning
and 2 balconies. One block from B-school. Call 996-
0153. 56U0414
$80/month. Spring-Summer Sublet. 1 block from old
LM. 408 Benjamin. 994-3423. 96U0416
JULY & AUGUST SUBLET!
Great 2-bedroom bi-level apt. Yes, this place is really
great! A steal at $215/mo. Call now for more info!
Joe-769-4599. 1110 Oakland No.4. dU0414
URGENT! Must Sublet. May-August room in house.
Location great. Rent extremely cheap. 665-6199.
77U0413
2 rooms in 3 bedroom house. Great location. Price
negotiable. Call 995-3964. 37U0412
Big 3 bedroom apt. to be sublet singly or as unit.
Large kitchen, living room. Close to central campus
and I-M building. Utilities and parking included.
Huge basement! Rent very negotiable. Call 995-0998.
89U0418
SUBLET: Own room for female in furnished 2
bedroom apt., air conditioned, excellent location in
north campus. 764-4479 or evenings 668-7365. 54U0412
ROOMS for Spring-Summer. Very reasonable.
Single and double. 2 minutes from diag. Call per-
sistently 761-3126. 07U0416
Spring-Summer Sublet/Fall option. 2 bedroom apt.
Furnished, air conditioning, pa king, laundry
facilities, near campus. Price negotiable. Call John
668-0195. 13U0417
AalbeCAMPUS
Available for May-August, completely furnished,
modern efficiencies and one bedroom apartments.
From $165/month. Dahlmann Apartmhents 761-7600
days, 665-2664 eves and weekends. cUtc
M Large room in house near business school. Nice
facilities. Jeff 668-1719. 62U0414
LIVE IN LUXURY! Spring and Summer Sublets
available in a beautifully renovated house on Green-
wood. Own room, 2 baths, big kitchen, washer, dryer,
dishwasher, front porch, sundeck, garage, three
blocks to campus, close to markets and drugstores.
Call 996-9470 anytime. dU0414
SUPER "SUBLET, MAY-AUGUST, 1 BDRM
DELUXE APT. HILL ST., FULL CARPET AND AIR
COND., DISHWASHER, 5 MIN. TO LAW QUAD, B-
SCHOOL, OLD I-M. RENT NEGOTIABLE, CALL
PERSISTENTLY 665-0214. 57U0414
SPRING SUMMER SUBLET. Spacious, -furnished,
parking, patio, close to campus, $190/mo. 662-0550.
00U0414
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED. Own room in two
bedroom apartment. May-May lease. Near State and
Huron. Call Doug 995-0361 evenings. dU0412

2 Level, 1 Bedroom apt. A.C., Color T.V., completely
furnished. 511 East Hoover (Across from I.M.).
Price negotiable. 996-1258. 66U0412
Spring/Summer Sublet. Modern 2 bedroom apar-
tment for 2 or 3. Furnished, air conditioning,,
balcony, dishwasher, laundry facilities. Great
location. $250/mo. or best offer. Barb, 663-6186.
68U0412
MAIZE & BLUE APT.-Air-conditioning, on Cam-
pus, free parking, disposal and dishwasher. Price
negotiable. 668-7848, 33U0412
SUBLET FOR SUMMER-1bedroom in a 2 bedroom
apt. $90 a month, 15 minute walk to diag. Prefer non-
smoking male. Call around 6 pm 662-4177. 04U0416
Rooms available, double occupancy, $280/mo. 8
month lease, 3 minutes from diag, meals included.
769-1756 or 994-4555. 06U0416
ROOMMATES
NON-SMOKING FEMALE wanted to share clean
two bedroom apartment in home near Medical Cen-
ter. Own room, parking, washer/dryer. September
'81/September '82. Debbie 668-0376. 37Y0412
Roommate needed for two bedroom apartment,
spring/summer. Near campus 665-7700, Dave.,
52Y0417
FEMALE ROOMMATE-larger room in 2-bedroom
apartment. Fully furnished, close to campus. Laun-
dry facilities. Rent negotiable. Call Sue/Rona 996-
0196. 68Y0415
2 Female Roommates needed for Fall 1981 to share 2
bedroom apt., near campus, reasonable. Karis 764-
9720 or Peggy 764-5632. 26Y0415
Female roommate needed for Forest Terrace Apar-
tment. Fall occupancy. Call 764-5944. dY0415
Males need roommates for apartment. Low cost,
nice place, good location. Call 764-1707. 79Y0415
KOSHER ROOMMATE WANTED. We are two
kosher guys looking for third person to share our 3
bedroom apartment for the 1981-1982 school year. r3
blocks from central campus, laundry and parking.
996-0887. 05Y0417
1-3 females needed for spacious 2-bedroom apt.
Parking, SAUNA, laundry, AC, close to campus,
price negotiable. Call 665-2130. dY0417
MALE ROOMMATE needed for summer sublet with
fall option. Furnished, 5 min. from campus, 973-0236
between 6-7. cY0418
Non-smoking female roommate WANTED to share
charming one bedroom apartment in fall. Com-
pletely furnished, convenient location. 665-5763 per-

Japanese (
TOKYO (AP) - U.S. officials ex-
pressed regret yesterday over the
sinking of a Japanese cargo ship by a
U.S: nuclear submarine and to reassure
the Japanese that there was no cause
for concern about radioactive con-
tamination..
U.S. Ambassador Mike Mansfield
called on Foreign Minister Masayoshi
Ito to offer regrets and report that the
sub had sustained no damage to its
weapons system or reactor, a Foreign
Ministry spokesperson said.
MANSFIELD AND ITO also
discussed possible U.S. compensation
for the two missing Japanese
crewmembers, and Ito asked for a
thorough investigation of the incident
by U.S. authorities, the spokesperson
said.

Gen. William Ginn, commander of
U.S. forces in Japan, issued a
statement on behalf of his troops and
their families expressing regret and
"our sympathy" for the missing
crewmembers.
Secretary of the Navy John Lehman
also issued a statement, in Washington,
saying the United States deeply
regretted the incident and that "a
thorough investigation of the circum-
stances is now under way."

SPREAD YOUR WINGS
~'~' with DANCE CLASSES from
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
DEPARTMENT OF DANCE
Spring Classes are:
* Beginning Jazz
* Advanced-Beginning Ballet
* Intermediate Ballet

Dance classes begin the week of April 27th. To pre-register:
1) Call (313) 763-4321, M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., if you have Visa or Mastercard.
2) Come to U-M Extension Service Building at 412 Maynard St., M-F, 8
a.m.-5 p.m.
3) Come to the U-M Dance Building on North University Court (East
wing of the Central Campus Recreation Building) between 6-8
p.m. on Wednesday, April 22nd.
4) Send us a mail registration form from our free catalog.
CLASSES WITHOUT SUFFICIENT PRE-REGISTRATION BY FRIDAY, APRIL
24th WILL BE CANCELLEDI Call University of Michigan Courses in Adult
Education during normal business hours at (313) 763-4321 for a FREE
CATALOG of information on these or any of our other twenty-nine
classes. X5 1.
U-M Extension Service
412 Maynard St.AnnArbor4819
18171

I

L.

L

-7d A 4'I I ME . i - m
GIANT FLEA MARKET
Bargains, furniture, antiques, collectables, jewelry,
and misc. 150 dealers. Every weekend 6 pm-10 pm
Friday, 10 am-6 pm Sat. & Sun. 214 E. Michigan at
park, downtown Ypsilanti. Dealers welcome. 971-
7676 weekdays, 487-5890 weekends. cWtc

1 /1 -

2975 Honaa 5u-4 U L. IExcellent con
Call Ted 663-6249.

71Z0412

SPRING/SUMMER and FALL VACANCIES
The Rudolf Steiner House
(a non-profit corporation)
1923 Geddes Avenue
Walking distance to campus near the Arboretum-
parking in rear

- _

GIFT THE FUTURE EXECUTIVE WITH BUZZWORD BEVERAGE GLASSE$
Open the lines of communication with your Business School graduate:
propose a toast that incorporates viable business buzzwords. Our set
of six 14-ounce glasses speaks boardroom language that is of imperative
use in social conversations and gatherings for the upwardly mobile, $15.
Boxed set includes three glasses buzzed with SHORTFALL, PSYCHOGRAPHICS,
M.B.O., AMBIENCE, DIVESTITURE, TRANSNATIONALISM, FEASIBILITY, IMPACT,
VIABLE AND BOTTOM LINE. The other three with SYNERGISM, ECONOMETRICS,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan