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April 09, 1981 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-09

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Page 10-Thursday, April 9, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Soviets
say shuttle
may lead
to Cosmic
arms race

MOSCOW (AP)-The Soviet Union, which once warmly
praised American space missions, has taken a hostile at-
titude to the U.S. space shuttle and is warning that the
program may lead to a cosmic arms race.
Soviet space officials and the state-controlled news media
are portraying tomorrow's maiden flight of the space shuttle
Columbia as the start of a new "militarist and chauvinistic
effort" by America to blackmail the world with "super-
weapons."
OFFICIAL commentaries indicate Moscow is determined
to counter whatever military advantages the shuttle brings
America. Despite official denials, there are some indications
the Kremlin has already started its own shuttle program.
Lt. Gen. Vladimir Shatalov, the chief of the Soviet
cosmonaut training, attacked the possible military uses of
the American shuttle at a Moscow news conference Wed-
nesday.
"Of course, if the United States and the Pentagon leaders

take this road, it will be a great tragedy for the entire world,"
Shatalov said. "It will mean a new spiral in the arms race,
and certainly will bring the United States nothing, no advan-
tages, except new enormous, colossal expenditures and more
international tension."
U.S. OFFICIALS say the shuttle is primarily a civilian
research craft, but it also is expected to be used for putting
spy satellites in orbit and for other military missions. The
Pentagon has "reserved" for its use more than one-third of
the shuttle flights planned by late 1986.
The launching of the Columbia comes as the Soviets are
waging a massive propaganda campaign against the Reagan
administration, a campaign designed to make America's
leaders appear bent on world domination through military
strength.
One thing the U.S. space shuttle can do that current Soviet
programs cannot is to capture an enemy satellite and bring it
back to Earth.

HouseDems attack
Reagan tax cut plan

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BRIGHTON & ORTONVILLE, MICH.
FINAL INTERVIEW DATE
APRIL 16, CALL 764-7456
FOR APPOINTMENT
Staff needs: male counselors, campcraft-nature, arts &
crafts, sports, tripping, horseback riding, performing arts spe-
cialists, unit supervisors, bus drivers, nurse, kitchen/main-
tenance staff.
FRESH AIR SOCIETY
6600 W. Maple Rd.
W. Bloomfield, Mi. 48033
(313) 661-0600
A JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION AGENCY

Sell Your'Unwanteds'
thru Daily Classifieds
POETRY READING
with
ALEXANDER BAIN,
ABU BAKAR LO BANISJAKO,
and D. CLINTON
READING FROM THEIR WORKS
THURSDAY, APRIL 9 at 7:30 pm
ADMISSION: FREE
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
662-5189

WASHINGTON (AP)-House
Democrats labeled President Reagan's
tax-cut proposals "the fiscal equivalent
of faith in a free lunch" yesterday and
said the spending cuts he wants would
hurt poor and middle-income
Americans.
Renewing ,their attack on Reagan's
economic program in an unusual eight-
page statement of "Democratic
economic principles," party members
declared their willingness to back an ef-
fort to restrain federal spending,
provide tax relief and reduce the size of
government.
BUT THE statement, approved by
voice vote after a closed-door session of
the party caucus, took issue with the
specifics of the Reagan approach and
said Democrats would reject a
program "that puts the main burden of
fighting inflation on the backs of the
middle and low income workers while
providing unprecedented benefits for
the privileged few."

On taxes, the statement said belief
that the administration's three-year tax
cut plan will stimulate the economy
without fueling inflation "is the fiscal
equivalent of faith in a free lunch."
"In sum, we pledge to develop a lean
federal budget-which puts us on the
path to balancing the budget and
provides for the human needs of our
people," said the statement.
IN A SEPARATE statement, the
chairman of the House Budget Commit-
tee, Rep. James Jones (D-Okla.)
blasted the administration for refusing
to accept any changes in its economic
proposals.
"The administration says it can ac-
cept no amendments. That it's budget is
untouchable," Jones said as the panel
resumed work on overall budget
guidelines.
"No administration has ever made
such demands, and no Congress has
ever accepted such'demands. It is not
the job of the Congress not to think," he
said.
The alternative Democratic budget
calls for slightly deeper cuts than the
president proposed and a smaller
deficit, but earmarked more spending
for social programs and less for defense
than the administration recommended.

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'THE IHIFFLETUK

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Food for

Thought

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Some of you might not know what a
whiffletree is-here's a hint: several of
them can be found at 208 W. Huron among
the straw forks, potato planters and other
antique farm implements. No, the location
does not house a flea market, but The
Whiffletree Restaurant (incidentally, a
whiffletree is a swinging bar to which the
traces of a harness are fastened to pull a
carriage, plow or wagon). These
decorative and once productive farm tools'
have something in common with the Whif-
fletree's kitchen: both produce (or in the
case of the antique implements, 'did
produce') delicious food.
To begin, try the Escargot with a bit of a
twist. These imported French snails are
served in the traditional pewter nest but
contrary to tradition they are topped with a
puffy pastry. This tasty addition should
have been made part of the original
preparation long ago.
Another possible appetizer, which is ac-
tually a meal in itself, is The Whiffletree's
Spinach Salad. This superior salad, chock
full of wilted spinach, mushrooms, chop-
ped eggs, bacon and onion, is accom-
panied by a hot bacon dressing. When they
say 'hot,' they mean it-this flavorful
dressing comes to the table in a butter
warmer complete with candle.
The dinner menu, which includes a wide
selection of meat and seafood entrees, is
supplemented daily with a flyer full of
specialty items. The flyer, which con-
stitutes a full menu itself, contains up to
eleven fresh-catch and five new dinner
specials a day, as well as a two week
special onrone of the house favorites at a
reduced once.

But back to dinner . . . A previous
special which has recently been added to
the standard menu (and rightfully so) is The
Whiffletree Stuffed Shrimp. These jumbo
shrimp, stuffed with King Crabmeat and,
Baby Shrimp, are all covered with The
Whiffletree's smooth and delicate hollan-
doise sauce. The mixture is delectable and
well-complimented by generous mounds of
rice pilaf.
You can't go wrong with the Barbequed
Ribs. These tender baby spareribs, baked
in a special marinade and Barbeque sauce,
create another house specialty that's
finger-lickin' good.
With-food like this there's bound to be a
line waiting outside (there are no reser-
vations 'except for parties of eight or
more), so in tune with customer demand
The Whiffletree is expanding to accom-
modate 100 more diners. Judging by the

restaurant's popularity, each of those extra
seats will be needed.
The Whiff letree is also introducing a lun-
ch menu for the first time (this very week,
in fact). Be one of the first to try the new
menu which includes scaled down portions
of regular evening fare as well as some
tempting new creations. Most of the
burgers were developed especially for the
new menu. Your curiosity might be
provoked by such names as the Greek or
Monterrey burger.
The only way to find out what surprises
lay waiting is to visit The Whiffletree for
lunch or dinner. Hours are: mon-Sat 11:30
am until 2:00 am, and Sunday from 4:00
pm until 2 am. The kitchen is open until
midnight Sunday thru Thursday, and 1:00
am on Friday and Saturday. You'll be glad
you did!
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Serving the finest in
Seafood Specials
every lunch & dinner
Spirits Served

769-8591
NG TON

For a Course in Fine Dining
Read the Restaurant Page
Each Thursday

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112 W. WASH I

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Dining
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s-400 R-Vqafft Rn Au Ax"f
( 3>bb2-Ib' ' 99105

. H n995-0505
W. Huron

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Co.a
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Discover the pleasures of dining with truly
tasteful seafood specialties in a not to be
missed comfortable relaxing atmosphere.
Serving lunch and dinner.
341 S. Main 769-5960
Grand food, glorious cozy old fashion at-
mosphere and warm hospitality. Renowned
barbecued ribs and much, much more.
Serving lunch and dinner.
314 S. Fourth Ave. 662-8485

Fine German & American Food
Imported & Local Beer Wine . Liquors
Open Daily 11am-8:30pm, Sun. 11-8
Fri. and Sat. il,9:00 pm
Phone 662-0737
120 W. Washington Downtown Ann Arbor

11

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Where the stars come out in Ann Arbor.

1

When the footlights fall,
you'll often find Ann Arbor's
visiting celebrities at the Stage
Dorn And. -froOm iciheo T i e

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