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April 09, 1981 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-09

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, April 9, 1981 -Page 3

Reagan administration

# f
r

considers tighter security

From AP and UPI
The adminstration is considering
ways to tighten security following the
assassination attempt against
President Reaganand an increase in
threats against him and Vice President
George Bush, officials said yesterday.
Meanwhile, President Reagan,
showing continued improvement with
no sign of complications from his gun-
shot wound, probably will be ready to
return to the White House as early as
Friday - and no later than Monday, a
key physician said yesterday.
IN OTHER developments, federal
agents can find no connection between
the man accused of shooting President
Reagan and a man arrested in New
York City and charged with threatening
the president's life, the Secret Service
said yesterday.
An extensive inquiry produced no in-
dication Edward Richardson, the 22-
year-old arrested Tuesday on charges
of threatening the president, knew John
Hinckley Jr., the 25-year-old charged
with trying to kill Reagan on March 30,
Secret Service officials said in New
York and in Washington.

Meanwhile, a Secret Service agency
spokesman declined to cite the number
of threats against the two leaders, but
unconfirmed reports said there were as
many as 300.
TREASURY SECRETARY Donald
Regan said on NBC's "Today"
program the president's schedule and
travel plans probably will no longer be
available for publication because of the
attempt on Reagan's life.
Regan said the FBI might seek more
authority to deal with and report about

suspicious persons.
There also are suggestions Reagan's
public appearances be limited,
although his aides know he would be
loathe to go along with them.
Acting White House press secretary
Larry Speakes said "no decision" has
been made on whether Reagan's ap?
pointments will continue to be made
public. He said earlier Bush's appoin
tments no longer will be issued for
publication.

RAE ZEEMAN holds a fishbowl containing a fish received at the White House yesterday along with a huge jar of
jellybeans and other gifts for the president as he recovers from gunshot wounds.

HAPPENINGS-
FILMS
A-V Services - Four Teen Mothers and Their Babies, 12:05 p.m., SPH II
Aud.
Cinema Guild - Marie Antoinette, 7 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Mediatrics - Nicholas and Alexandra, 7 p.m., A Doll's House, 10:15 p.m.,
Nat. Sci. Aud.
CFT-Woodstock, 4, 7:30 p.m., Mich. Theatre.
Colorado Slide Shows Loft - I'm a Pretty Nice Person Now, a documen-
tary on Clonlara, Ann Arbor alternatice school, 8 & 10 p.m., 119 East Liberty.
SPEAKERS
Urbark Planning - Mitch Rycus, "Analytic Methods in Planning," 11 a.m.,
1040 Daria.
RPM - John McGuire, "The Forest Service in the 70s and 80s," noon, 2556
Dana.
CHGD, SPH, Psych. - Yvonne Brackbill, "Drug Exposure and Drug In-
formation in Pregnancy and Childbirth," 2 p.m., SPH Aud.
Computing Ctr., CIVS - Allen Bromley, "Charles Babbag's Analytical
Engine," 4 p.m., Rackham E. Conf. Room.
CSJ - Suan Pharr, "The Status of Politics in Japan: the Revolution of the
Tea-Pourers," 4 p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
Hopwood Festival - Arthur Miller, Children's Book Council Award will be
announced, 4 p.m., Rackham Lec. Hall.
Chemistry, ACS Coll. - Fred Basolo, "Associative Ligand Susstitution
Reactions of 18-Electron Organometallic Complexes," 8 p.m., 104 Jefferson
Bldg., EMU.
Hispanic-American Lec. Series - Albert Camarillo, "Chicanos in the
Cities: Past and Present Status," 8 pm., Rackham Amphitheater.
Chemistry - Paul Klymko, "Exciton Transport and Annihilation in
Organic Crystals," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Cognitive Science - Robert Wilensky, "Planning and Understanding," 4
p.m., MLB 4.
CHGD - William Hamilton, "Return to an Evolutionary View: The
Molding of Senescence by Natural Selection," noon, 1139 Nat. Sci
Vision/Hearing - John McReynolds, "Synaptic Inputs to Mudpuppy
Retinal Ganglion Cells," 12:15 p.m., 2055 MHRI.
Ann Arbor Advocates for Safe Alternatives in Childbirth - "Happy and
Healthy Home Birth," 7:30 p.m., Wesley Foundation Lounge, 602 E. Huron.
ME & AM - Dr. T. Asmus, "Future Trends in Engines," 3:30 p.m., 143
Chrysler Center.
MEETINGS
Botticelli Game Players - noon, Dominick's.
Mi. Technic. - 3 p.m., B46 W. Engin.
Campus Weight Watchers - 5:30 p.m., Project Rm., League.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship-7 p.m., League and Union.
Alcoholics Anonymous - for staff, patients, community members, 8:30
p.m., N2815 U Hosp. (2nd Level, NPI).
Psych. Dept. - Committee on Undergraduate Studies, 4 p.m., K108, 580
Union Drive.
PERFORMANCES
Gilbert & Sullivan Society - "The Yeoman of the Guard," 8 p.m., Men-
delssohn Theatre.
UAC - Soundstage Coffeehouse, 8 p.m., Union U Club.
School of Music - Concert, Collegium Musicum, "The Music of Josquin de
Prez and his Contemporaries," 8p.m., Union Pendleton Rm.
School of Music - Jazz Band, 8 p.m., Rackham.
Romance Lang. - French Drama class, 3 plays by S. Guitry, J. Tardieu,
8:30 p.m., SEB Schorling Aud.
Ark - Hurricane Ridgerunners, stringband with harmonica, 9 p.m., 1421
Hill.
Canterbury Loft - "Ladyhouse Blues," 8p.m., 332 S. State.
The Blind Pig - Blue Front Persuaders, 208S. First St.
School of Music - MM Piano Recital, Anthony Lun, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
School of Music - Trombone Recital, Larry Zalkind, 8 p.m., Stearns.
MISCELLANEOUS
International Night -5 p.m., League cafeteria.
Skydivers Club - First Jump course, 7 p.m., 2084 E. Engin.
Guild House - Poetry reading, Alexander Bain, Abu Bakar Lo Banisjako,
D. Clinton, 7:30p.m., 802 Monroe.
MEEREH-Felafel Snack, 10:30 p.m., Lloyd Blue Carpet Lounge.
Medical Ctr. Bible Study - 12:30 p.m., F2230 Mott Library Children's
Hosp.
CEW - Panel disc., "Options and Opportunities for Librarians," 1:30
p.m., Rackham E. Lecture Hall.
Polish/American Students Organization - Paper for Poland/Polish
Solidarity Day Rally, 9 a.m., MLB and Fishbowl.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of;
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.

Final MSA election
tally expected today

By BETH ALLEN
Winners of nearly all 37 Michigan
Student Assembly seats will probably
be named today, according to election
officials.
Votes in the presidential and vice
presidential contest were expected to
be tabulated by midnight last night, ac-
cording to Elections Director Bruce
Goldman.
ALMOST 2,300 ballots were cast in
the student government election on
Tuesday, the first day of voting, accor-
ding to election officials. Voting con-
cluded early last night.
A count of 5,000 votes in two days is

considered to be a "good or average"
turnout, according to Assistant Elec-
tions Director Richard Campbell.
Voting was especially heavy in LSA
and the engineering college, Goldman
said.
MSA ballots must be validated and
counted by hand before final results
are determined.
While most of the polling places
operated "very well," Campbell said,
some polling places opene.d late
because poll workers did not show up on
time. "We try to have a store of
workers here at MSA (to help out),"
Campbell said.

Geography department says
review report unfair

(Continued from Page 1)
Michigan from most states of the
Union, and from a number of countries
overseas," stated the response.
The statement noted "virtually every
one of those who received graduate
degrees in the department is employed
in his or her professional capacity at
the present time. The department also
contributes to the undergraduate
liberal arts program as well. Twenty
percent of those graduating from the
College in 1980 took one or more
geography courses."
ACCORDING TO THE response, 10 of
the 27 departments in the college have
lower student to faculty ratios than
does geography. High cost per student
credit hour was cited as one of the
reasons for the review committee's
conclusion.
Brazer said although it's "unfor-
tunate" that geography had to be the
first department considered for discon-
tinuance, the committee made its in-
vestigation on the assumption that
geography would not be the last depar-
tment targeted and therefore did not
feel obligated to demonstrate

geography is the weakest department
in the college.
THE RESPONSE also cites the
testimony a professor called in for the
external portion of the review process.
"The discontinuance procedures are
meant to serve as a collective solution
for the shortcomings of less productive
individual senior faculty members,
examples of which must certainly be
scattered throughout the University's
departments as they are here at Prin-
ceton. The discontinuance process
creates a self-fulfilling momentum if
not checked," stated Prof. Julian
Wolpert.
UNISEX
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by Professionals at ...
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mommi

The Department of Philosophy
announces
THE TANNER LECTURE PROGRAM, 1980-81
April 10& 11
JOHN RAWLS
James Bryant Conant University Professor
Harvard University
The Tanner Lecture on Human Values
"Basic Liberties and Their Priority"
Friday, April 10, 3:30 p.m.
Modern Languages Building, Auditorium 4
SYMPOSIUM ON THE
TANNER LECTURE
Saturday, April 11
Modern Languages Building, Auditorium 4
9:15 a.m. Presentation of comments:
ANTHONY KRONMAN
Professor of Law, Yale Law School
BRIAN BARRY
Professor of Political Science and of Philosophy,
The University of Chicago
SAMUEL SCHEFFLER
Associate Professor of Philosophy,

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