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April 05, 1981 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-05

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, April 5, 1981--Page 3

,HAPPENINGS
SUNDAY, APRIL 5
FILMS
AAFC - The Roundup, 7, 10:20 p.m., The Red and the White, 8:40 p.m.,
MLB 3.
Cinema Guild - Tales of Hoffman, 7, 9:30 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II - French Can-Can, 7 p.m., La Bete Humaine, 9 p.m., Angell
Hall, AUd. A.
MCTF - The Letter, 2, 3:45, 5:30,7:15 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
SPEAKERS
Wesley Foundation - Bishop Dale White, Alan Luther, "U.S. and Iran:
What's in the Future?", 7:30 p.m., 602 E. Huron.
Hillel - Michael Brooks, "Masada television Series" 9-11 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Museum of Art - Prof. Niara Sudarkasa and Bamidele Agbasegba
Demerson, "African Art and Culture in West Africa", 3 p.m., Museum of
Art.
MEETINGS
SYDA - India Vegetarian Cooking class, 2p.m.,1510 Hill.
Karma Thegsum Choling - Discussion on Buddhist Texts, 4 p.m., 734
Fountain.
ACLU - Annual Meeting, 1 p.m., 331 Thompson.
Moscow Scientific Sunday Seminar - 1:30 p.m., E. Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg.
RC - Conf., "Is Pornography Really a Feminist Movement?," 8:30 a.m.,
"Reconsidering the Feminist Movement," 10 a.m.-noon, "Women in
Socialist Countries," 1 p.m., "Oppression in Women of Color," 2:30 p.m.,
"Self-Defense," 4-5:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
School of Music - Michigan Youth Band, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.
Hillel - Hillel Hebrew Musicians, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Ark - Louis Killen, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill St.
Rudi Foundation - Ali Akbar Khan,8 p.m., Rackham Aud.
Ann Arbor Figure Skating Club - "Melody on Ice," 2:30 p.m., Veteran's
Arena, Jackson Rd. at Maple.
School of Music - faculty Artists Concert, 2:30 p.m., Rackham Aud.
MISCELLANEOUS
Washtenaw Audubon Society - Field trip to Erie Gun Club, 8 a.m., meet at
Pittsfield School parking lot.
Hillel - Israeli Dancing, 1-3 p.m., Deli Dinner, 6 p.m., Tay Sachs
Screening, 12-6 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Rec. Sports - IM Badminton (coed) Tournament, 6:30 p.m., NCRB.
Rec. Sports - Family Sunday Funday, "Paddle Basketball," 2 p.m.,
NCRB.
M Club - 7th Annual Michigan Antiques Show & Sale, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Crisler Arena.
Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library - Spring Book Sale, 1 p.m.-5
p.m., Ann Arbor Public Library.
WUOM - Options in Education, "Standardized Testing", 11:30 a.m., 91.7
FM.
MONDAY, APRIL 6
FILMS
AAFC - False Movements, 7 p.m., Radio On, 9 a.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
MCTF - The Letter, 5:45, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Women's Studies - Female Socialization in the 1950's, 7 p.m., MLB 3.
SPEAKERS
Medical Care Organization - Cy Briefer, "Medical Care: A Right or a
Wrong?" 3 p.m., Rm. M3163, SPH II.
Applied Mechanics - Ian Sneddon, "Cracks in Disks, Cylinders and
Cylindrical Holes," 4 p.m., 311 W. Eng. Bldg.
Energy Studies - Weston Vivian, "Energy Supply," 4 p.m., 2102 MLB.
English - Reading by Madeline DeFrees, 4 p.m., Rackham Amph.
Macromolecular Research - J. S. Higgins, "Dynamics of Polymer Chains
in Solution and in the Melt Studies by Neutron Spin-Echo Measurements," 4
p.m., Cooley White Aud.
MSA, PIRGIM - Presidential Debate, Union Kuenzel Room, 7:30 p.m.
Pirgim-Adrienne Selko, "What you should know about Toxic Shock
Syndrome," 7 p.m., Alice Lloyd Blue Carpet Lounge.
Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies - Scott Grosse, "The
Politics of Family Planning in Maghreb", noon, Lane Hall Commons.

Center for Russian and East European Studies - Prof. Steven Burg,
"Yugoslovia Without Tito: Defining the Role of the Party," 4 p.m., B116
MLB.
Latin America - Bill O'Brien, slide show on reconstruction, 7:30 p.m., St.
Mary's Lounge.
Hillel - Michael Brooks comments on the "Massada" television series,
1429 Hill.
MEETINGS
U-M Bike Club - 7:30 p.m., 1084 E. Engineering Bldg.
Ann Arbor Council for Traditional Music and Dance - Mass
organizational meeting, 7:30 p.m., Union Pendleton Room.
Extension Service - Michigan Assn. of Infant Mental Health:
Vulnerability and adaptation, 7 a.m., Rackham Aud.
Bible Study Group -12:15 p.m., W5603 Main Hosp. Nuc. Med. Conf. Room.
SACUA -1:15 p.m., 40215 Administration Bldg.
Michigan Technic - 3 p.m., B46 W. Engineering Bldg.
LSA Faculty - 4:10 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
CEW - "Library Science,"6 p.m., 328 Thompson.
Christian Science Organization -7:15 p.m., 3909 Union.
PERFORMANCES
PTP-Gertrude Stein Gertrude Stein Gertrude Stein," 8 p.m., Power
Center.
MISCELLANEOUS
WCBN - Women's Affairs Program, 6 p.m., 88.3 FM.
Friends of the Library - Spring Book Sale, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Ann Arbor
Public Library.

AT LEAST 8 KILLED

Twisters tear through

Midwest

By United Press International
Tornado laced thunderstorms lumbered over the
nation's midsection yesterday killing at least eight
people, injuring dozens of others, and causing
millions in property damage.
The worst of the storms hit West Bend, Wis., where
three people died.
TWISTERS ALSO tore up large sections of Illinois
and Iowa, with winds gusting to 90 mph. High winds
raked Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri,
Nebraska, and Indiana.
The National Weather Service reported 140 tor-
nadoes in all from the southern and central Plains in-
to the Ohio River Valley and Great Lakes states.
A Dallas woman was killed and her son suffered a
skull fracture when she lost control of her car on a
highway during high winds and heavy rain.
TWENTY-ONE PASSENGERS aboard a United

Airlines DC-0 en route to Newark, N.J., were injured
when the plane hit a pocket of turbulence over Han-
nibal, Mo., and plunged 2,000 feet.
The plane which had taken off from Los Angeles,
landed late Friday at Chicago's O'Hare International
Airport. Most of the injuries were minor.
. As many as 100 persons were injured - 50 needing
hospitalization - in the first tornado ever to hit West
Bend. Officials estimated damage from a night of
severe weather at $10 million.
THE TORNADO CUT a swath about a block wide
and three miles long in West Bend, destroying homes
trees, and utility poles and overturning cars.
Tom Johnson, 26, whose house was damaged, said
he had about 10 seconds warning before the tornado
hit.
"I heard that goddarn wind and I jumped out of
bed," Johnson said. "I felt my roof shaking and then
it was over. I looked out and could see all kinds of

homes damaged and people running around."
TORNADOES CAUSED dozens of injuries and
widespread property damage in southern and
western Illinois and Iowa.
In Sandyville, Iowa, a 2-year-old child being
carried to safety by his mother was killed when high
winds toppled a tree that hit the child on his head.
Authorities clocked winds in Scott County, Iowa, at 90
mph.
A tornado uprooted trees, downed power lines and
ripped the roof off a movie theater in Edwardsville,
Ill. Just south of Edwardsville, five people were in
jured and 20 trailers damaged at a trailer court. A
tornado touched down in Granite City, Ill., injuring 17
persons, four of whom required hospitalization.
Indiana State Police said the west wall of the Lake
County Public Library at Merrillville, Ind., caved in
and crumbled, apparently from strong winds Friday
night.

47 killed in renewed
fighting in Lebanon

Ulrich's Annual
Inventory Sale
Involving every item in our store
except textbooks.
Special prices on calculators.

From AP and UPI
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syrian and
Lebanese army units battled with ar-
tillery and rockets along Beirut's
Moslem-Christian dividing line yester-
day, leaving at least 47 dead and 191
wounded and threatening a new civil
war.
The Beirut police department gave
the casualty figures for the capital and
said they were in addition to the 102
killed and 300 wounded in the last four
days in Beirut and the Roman Catholic
city of Zahle, where fighting erupted
anew shortly after another truce
collapsed.
BEIRUT RADIO reported late
yesterday that calm was returning to
both Beirut and Zahle three hours after
another cease-fire was supposed to take
effect. The Voice of Lebanon radio of
the Christian Phalange militia also said
shooting had slacked off in both places.
Earlier, Beirut shook from one end to
the other with the roar of explosions as
the night skies were lit with flashes of
outgoing and incoming rockets from
Soviet-made launchers and mortar
shells.
A communique from the Lebanese
army command, whose forces man the
Christian side of the three-mile-long
dividing line, said its positions were un-
der fire and were returning fire.
THE TERSE communique did not
say where the shells were coming from,
but reporters saw artillery and rocket
barrages going toward the eastern,
Christian sector from positions held by
Soviets
say they
may have
found
Atlantis
MOSCOW (AP) - Soviet
oceanographers say they may have
discovered the lost continent of Atlantis
on the seabed several hundred miles
west of Portugal.
Andrei Monin, director of research
aboard the Soviet vessel Academician
Kurchatov, said scientists based their
hypothesis on "mysterious structures"
seen in 460 photographs taken of sunken
Ampere Mountain, 450 miles west of the
Straits of Gibraltar, between Portugal
and Madeira Island.
"IN A NUMBER of pictures of the
northeastern part of the summit,
researchers discerned rectangular
structures. On one of the photos, we can
see rectangular plates (one-yard) wide
rising from the bottom," the Tass news
agency quoted Monin as writing in the
Soviet magazine Earth and Universe.
"The position of the plates, individual
blocks, as well as the regular shape of
the plates photographed ... may testify
to their artificial origin," Monin said.
There are dozens of theories on the
possible location of Atlantis and
societies seeking to find it have formed
in numerous countries and undertaken
searches.
Some scholars believe Plato may
simply have been describing an
imaginary, ideal civilization, a utopia.
TODAY
PNA RBOR'

the Syrians in the western and Moslem
side of the dividing line.
The fighting flared along all the
traditional battlefronts of the 1975-76
civil war. Most of the fighting centered
on a three-mile-long line separating
Christian East Beirut and Moslem West
Beirut. Christian militiamen were
backing the Syrians, and Moslem gun-
men were supporting the Syrians.
Streets were deserted throughout the
city as many of the 1 million residents
of this Mediterranean capital huddled
in bomb shelters built during the 1975-76
civil war.
"I'M RUSHING DOWN again to the
shelter, taking my wife and kids with
me - they're panicked," said Hanna
Aoun, a Christian who lives close to the
line.
U.S. Ambassador John Gunther Dean
had just left the palace after a brief
meeting with President Elias Sarkis
when the first rocket landed in nearby
woods, state-run Beirut radio reported.
Dean was not harmed, the radio said.
"Shells are falling only yards away
from the presidential palace and the ar-
tillery fire on East Beirut is pouring
from all directions," a spokesman for
the right-wing Phalangist militia said.
A spokesman for the Phalange Party,
the largest Christian group in Lebanon,
also reported a massive barrage of ar-
tillery and rocket fire, over the
Christian suburbs of Hadass, Kfar
Shima and Hazmieh, where the
president's palace is located. "It's
raining bullets," he said.

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_ _ _

LECTURE BY
ARTHUR MILLER
Distinguished American Playwright

Thursday, April9,94:00 p.m.
Rackham Assembly Hall
(Main Floor)

ANNOUNCEMENT OF
THE 1981 HOPWOOD AWARDS
PANELS BY
HOPWOOD WINNING WRITERS:
FRIDAY, APRIL 10
10:00-12:00: Drama panel with Melvin Gordon, Dennis McIntyre, and Norman
Rosten
1:30-3:30: Poetry Panel with John Ciardi, Dorothy Donnelly, and X. J.
Kennedy
4:00-6:00: Poetry Reading and Discussion by Festival Panelists.
SATURDAY, APRIL 11
10:00-12:00: Fiction Panel with Max Apple, William Brashler, and Nancy
Willard
1:30.3:30: Essay Panel with John Malcolm Brinnin, Theodore Solotoroff, and
Chad Walsh
4:00.6:00: Fiction Reading and Discussion by Festival Panelists
Friday and Saturday morning panel sessions will be held in the Rackham Amphi-
theater (Fourth Floor). Saturday afternoon sessions will be held in the Henderson
Room, Michigan League.
All events ar.,freeand open to th.public.
rip TAPRIL 9-11,1981
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
yHopw1o od FE'stival
APRIL 9-11, 1981
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
The Hapwood Festival is made possible by grants from the Michigan Council for
the Humanities and the following units of The University of Michigon-the
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; The Howard R. Marsh Center of
the Deportment of Communication; the President's Office; and the College of
En ineerina.

F

- iIL 3bLc30t 4:
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