100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 07, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Students'
receive
amore than
roses in
C alifornia

By DAVID SPAK
Parties; parades, and Johnny Carson proved almost as
popular as the Wolverines to the hundreds of University
students who ventured to Pasadena for the 67th Rose Bowl
and watched Michigan beat the Washington Huskies 23-6.
LSA senior Dawn Amdursky was one of the students lucky
enough to get a seat for "The Tonight Show," starring
comedian Carson.
"WE GOT THERE at four in the morning and were one of
the last ones to get in," she said. "It was like Johnny Carson
was God."
Amdursky, like many other students, flew to Pasadena
courtesy of one of the University-sponsored packages, but
some students managed to get to California under their own
power.
Debbie Gathmann, a junior in the pharmacy school, said
she drove to the Rose Bowl. "I'd do it again next year,"
Gathmann said, because the trip was so exciting.
STUDENTS WHO went to the Rose Bowl under the full
University package got a trip that included plane fare, hotel
accommodations, tickets to the football game and Rose
Parade, a New Year's Eve party, and transportation for trips
to Tijuana, University Studios, Disneyland, and

Marineland.
The only complaint LSA senior Chris Sallen had about the
trip was that he felt Conlin-Dobbs, the travel agency that sold
the official University-sponsored Rose Bowl tours, over-
booked his flight-out to California. Otherwise, Sallen-whose
accommodations were not included in his tour package-en-
joyed a nice, "laid back" vacation that included several par-
ties and camping out along the parade route at four in the
morning.
Band member Bill Maxbauer, who like all other band
members had his expenses paid for, had a more hectic
schedule.
HE SAID the band practiced drills during the day and gave
performances at night at such places as Marina Del Rey,
Disneyland, the Century Plaza Hotel, and the Hyatt Inter-
national Hotel.
It was Maxbauer's first trip to California, but he rated it "a
10."
"It was unreal. They made us feel at home even though we
were not," he said.
MSA Vice President Virna Hobbs said she was upset that
Homecoming Queen Sheri King did not ride on the Big Ten
float in the parade and that the tour wasn't better organized.

* i
O
0
I-
0
v
3
IA
-4
C
m
Z
-f
C
V1
mI
v

LESSONS * RENTALS * SALES * EXPERT REPAIR
to
HERB DAVID
GUITAR STUDIO
209 S. State Street O
Ann Arbor (Upstairs)
665-8001
INSTRUMENTS
ACCESSORIES
LESSONS
INSTRUMENTS
CUSTOM H P'IUGAJ"F-
I0
WE MAKE: " IRISH HARPS " GUITARS " BANJOS " FIDDlLES

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 7, 1981-Page 5

Soap industry pushes phosphates

MILWAUKEE ,(AP)-Deter ents
containing phosphates were shooed
fromh many supermarket shelves in the
1970s, indicted by environmentalists for
*ftheir fertilizing powers that clogged
lakes and streams with algae and other
plant life.
Now the laundry industry is asking
consumers to take a more critical look
at non-phosphate alternative detergen-.
ts..
Industry spokesmen say such produc-
ts not only don't clean as well as
phqsphate detergents but also damage
clothes, washing machines, and the
of amity pocketbook.
ANDRIA BROWN, an economist for
Speed Queen Corp. in Ripon, said her
company spent'$7 million to redesign
coign-opera ted equipment with non-
stainless steel; parts which were better
able to withstand the abrasiveness of
non-phosphate additives.
For the consumer, said Brown, use of
noniphosphate detergents may mean
higher utility bills because they need
hotter water.
Ih addition, she said, the Soap &
*Detergent Association of New York
calculates it costs four times more to
buy extra laundry supplies to boost the
cleaning power of non-phosphate
detergents "than for a consumer to pay
his share of improved sewage treat-
ment."
KAY OLSON is a home economics
teacher in Wausau and a leader of a
group of home economists who are
planning to lobby legislators this year
in favor of a return to phosphate
detergents.
Olson complains that non-phosphate
detergents are expensive and, like
Brown, suggests that environmen-
talists should be aiming their clean-up
..2 T ... ... .

efforts at sewage treatment plants.
"I'm ying more to have a clean
wash while nothing is being done to
cleanup the lakes,"she said.
DUANE SCHUETTPELZ, an in-
vestigator for the state Department of
Natural Resources, says, "there is a
counter argument" to the suggestions
that the pollution problem ought to be
tackled at sewage treatment plants
rather than in the laundry machine.
"The head of the Chicago
Metropolitan Sewerage Commission
once predicted a 40 percent increase in
sludge if polyphosphates were to
return," he said.
The DNR has been studying non-
phosphate detergents for 18 months and
will probably report to the Legislature
next year when Wisconsin reviews its
1979 law which banned the chemicals.
BUT ACCORDING to Schuettpelz,
the department has not been "looking
at what the laundry capabilities are" of
alternative detergent additives or in-
vestigating the increased costs people
may be paying because of garments
prematurely aged by non-phosphate
detergents.
In 1971, Indiana was the first state to
ban sale of detergents containing more
than 3 percent phosphates by weight.
Fewer-than two dozen states followed
that lead, despite findings ina Canada-
U.S. study soon after that most
phosphorous in the Great Lakes was
coming from municipal sewage treat-
ment plants, and that 70 percent of it
originated with household detergents.
Several years later, the U.S. En-
vironmental Protection Agency also

banned use of NTA, nitrilotriacetic
acid, a phosphate alternative whose use
is allowed in Canada. But the EPA's
original fears that NTA was toxic have
since been reconsidered, and some
researchers suggest it may end the
search for a phosphate alternative in
the United States.
THE PROBLEM with alternative
detergents seems to lie with the
chemical used instead of
phosphates-sodium carbonate, or old-
fashioned soda,
John Harkin, a University of Wiscon-
sin organic chemist and professor of
environmental toxicology, explains
that phosphates are expecally valuable
in hard water laden with minerals such
as calcium. Phosphates counteract the
minerals and suspend dirt particles,
making it easier to rinse dirt out of the
wash.
"To overcome calcium problems,
phosphates suspend it while soda
precipitates it out,'' which coats
clothing with a dingy, abrasive film of
limestone, said Harkin, whose research
on detergents is being funded by gover-
nment sources and the detergent in-
dustry.
MANUFACTURERS of laundry
machines complain that the limestone
also coats moving parts, interfering
with valves and lining tubs and
agitators with an abrasive film that in-
creases fabric wear.
Harkin's research is concentrating on
the effect of nonphosphatedetergents
on septic systems. The soda alter-
natives "are very strongly alkaline"
which might actually inhibit the bac-
teria needed to dissolve waste matter in
septic systems, he said.
s"We don't know for sure. We are
only a year into the study," Harkin

said.
But it would be ironic, Harkin added,
if alkaloids prove detrimental to the
~septic systems of rural homeowners
whose legislators have been leading the
crusade against polyphosphates in the
interest of protecting rural lakes.

Daily Classifieds Bring Results

--

DISCO 'N ROCK
737 N. HURON
485-0240

I

64 to

Features WEEKNIGHT ENTERTAINMENT:
TONIGHT: TOBY REDD with SPECIAL GUEST
presented by LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
2 for 1 drinks until 10:30
pitcher specials all night
THURSDAY:
Huge KAPPA PHI ALPHA Party
DRINK S ECIALS
Overflowing crowds weekly
Every Monday: GREEK NIGHT
No cover with proper Greek ID,
NonGreeks admitted after 9 with cover charge
Pitcher specials, Capacity Crowds

4

x _

P...
C

,'z......................,..........
.:-:..:.::.:.::.:..:.::. - .:..:4:................-...,-............. . . . . . . ......,...'...,.............. '.. . .r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
::: : : ::.:.::.:r:.: ::v. .;. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..::.:. ..'
....,.. :.. . ..:. . . . . ..:.... . . . ..:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .... ..
. ..:.:.. .... ..................... .. ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....r.:". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..*.. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. ....... . . . . .... . .. .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
:-,.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .......:: . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
j..
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .......... . . . . . . . . . .
......... 101% f rhtpr {{' ~ spp $
~~~.. . ....... .................................nnprftoIe bok re ..........:
Secndf.or M. yanL :c blloo
....*..... .....P .. :
.. . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . ...':
r... ................

+:
:
:; :

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan