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April 01, 1981 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-04-01

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President's guards

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, April 1, l981-Page 9
look for answers

,.}

WASHINGTON (AP)-The Secret Service is
off on the inevitable soul search, trying to find
out how President Reagan could have been shot
qn home turf, barely a mile from the White
ouse.
"These guys were competing with a bullet,"
said Jack Warner of the Secret Service, the
agency charged with protecting presidents.
WARNER SAID yesterday the service is
conducting an in-house investigation, likely to
take several weeks, to see whether the agents
with Reagan made any wrong moves or could
have prevented the gunman from firing six
~hots at the president Monday as he left the

Washington Hilton Hotel.
"After reviewing the videotapes a dozen
times, we believe the presidential protection
was as effective as it could possibly be," War-
ner said. "These guys were competing with a
bullet. They moved as quickly as they could."
Warner said the inquiry, by the agency's of-
fice of inspection, is similar to those conducted
after John Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas
and Gerald Ford escaped injury in two Califor-
nia assaults. It will include interviews with
agents and law officers who were at the scene,
as well as eyewitnesses.
"THE REASON is to see whether we did
everything that we should have," he said. "We

have no answers yet."
On most occasions when Reagan leaves the
White House, he is accompanied by at least a
dozen Secret Service agents, all armed with
handguns. Some carry small, light, Uzi sub-
machine guns. In situations like the one he was
in Monday, Reagan is preceded from the hotel
by one agent. Several others walk on either side
of him.
As the president leaves a building, the agents
form a human shield between him and
everyone else. While he walks to his car, a time
agents consider particularly vulnerable, the
armored door is opened to provide another

shield.
AGENTS FOLLOW Reagan's car in a vehicle
of their own, a vehicle carrying Uzi sub-
machine guns, M-16 rifles and hand grenades.
The assault on Reagan was the first in the
nation's capital since Puerto Rican nationalists
tried to storm Blair House, across the street
from the White House, to kill Harry Truman in
1952.
Warner said the inquiry continues to indicate
that the gunman acted alone. "Everything at
this time points to the one-gunman theory," he
said.
IRONICALLY, THE Washington Hilton

Hotel where the assassination attempt took
place is considered a particularly secure area
as hotels go. Its side entrance, with a cement
canopy over the driveway, is designed for
quick presidential access.
Agents acknowledge they feel more secure in
Washington, where they know the buildings,
roads and location of hospitals. In other areas.
a local officer is always on hand with such in- -
formation.
Warner said he doesn't know whether the
assassination attempt will prompt changes in
presidential security measures.

f---

Disabled students
seek transportation
Other handicapped advocates say
(Continued from Page i e there are solutions that "won't cost the
Markley (whose renovations will be University a mint," said Breakthrough
completed this summer) have been peietRt hlis
Housing president Ruth Phillips.
made accessible, according to Housing PHILLIPS SUGGESTS that the
ivision Physical Properties Coor- University could persuade a cab
inator Paul Bowyer. Each dorm has company to purchase some accessible
approximately two modified rooms. taxis.
Modifications include lowering closet "If the University would convince the
bars, widening doorways, renovating cab company the demand exists that
bathrooms and installing ramps. the cabs would be utilized and that they
BOWYER ESTIMATED that $250,000 (the cab company) will be reimbursed
has been spent so far on the by the University, they would probably
renovations. be willing to try it," Phillips said, ad-
The University has made all its ding that the cabs could also be used by
programs accessible to the handicap- non-disabled students.
ed in one way or another, said Susan Another alternative suggested by
hompson from the Office of Affir- some members of the adminstration is
mative Action. "Each case must be that students use public transportation
handled indi Vidually," she said. such as the Ann Arbor Transportation
For example, if a student has a class Authority's Dial-a-Ride.
on the third floor of a building that is not "THERE IS FEDERALLY funded
accessible to a student in a wheelchair, transportation available, public tran-
the University will move the class so sportation," said University attorney
the student can attend. William Lemmer.
TRANSPORTATION for mobility But both DSS and Breakthrough said
impaired students remains a major a program such as Dial-a-Ride is not a
problem, however. Spokespersons from viable solution because rides are often
both Breakthrough and DSS say they late and students miss their classes.
Sealize that complete accessibility - And other University administrators
installation of lift equipment on all say they realize a public transportation
University buses - is next to im- is not the answer.
possible because of the costs. While both the administration and
However, they claim that the request handicapped advocates say they hope
for some lift-equipped vans is not the problem of accessible transpor-
unreasonable. A lift-equipped van costs tation won't be resolved in the cour-
about $25,000. - troom, they realize that it may.
Army overthrows
Thai government

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BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) - Army
generals overthrew the year-old gover-
nment of Prime Minister Prem Tin-
sulanonda in a pre-dawn coup today
and established a Revolutionary Com-
mitee to rule the country, Radio
Thailand announced.
A radio announcement said the
generals, considered pro-Western as
was Prem, seized power "because of
the deteriorating situation. Several
political parties are undermining the
stability of the government with an in-
tention of taking over the country and
changing it into a dictatorial state."
IT REPORTED that Gen. Sant Chit-
patima, deputy chief of the army, was
the head of the Revolutionary Commit-
eeand that Prem had both resigned as
prime minister army commander.
The constitution was abolished and
the Cabinet and Parliament dissolved
by the committee, which took over at 2
a.m:, according to the broadcast made
at 5a.m.
The coup came one day after
Thailand allowed Indonesian comman-
dos to assault a hijacked Indonesian
jetliner at the Bangkok airport and free
55 hostages.
THERE WAS NO indication that ac-
ion was connected with the removal of
Prem, also a general and commandeer
irichief of the army.
Sant, 59, is a close personal friend of
Prem. He was scheduled to assume
Prem's duties as army commander last
October when Prem became 60 years
old, the mandatory retirement age for
that post. Top military officers decided
to; give Prem one more year as army
*hief.
No violence was reported as the
military once again took over the
government. About 50 police officers
and soldiers wearing yellow armbands
and armed with rifles and pistols were
outside the royal palace and the gover-
nment house where Prem had his of-

fice. Prem's whereabouts were not
immediately known.
A COMMITTEE decree broadcast by
Radio Thailand also banned political
gatherings of more than five people,
threatening punishment of up to five
months in jail for violators.
Army commanders were summoned
to a meeting and told not to move their
troops, an announcement said.
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th A.e t liberty 761-700
April 3: "Stay As You Are"
with Natassia "Tess" Kinski
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ON FILM
A Forum on Animation and
Fantasy Filmmaking in the 80'.
FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1981-7:00 p.m.
ANGELL HALL AUDITORIUM
FREE ADMISSION

UAC MUSKET

UA C MUSKET
presents
GREASE

Tickets Available at CinemaC
and Ann Arbor Film Co-op SI

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