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March 28, 1981 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-28

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, March 28, 1981-Page 3
Sentiment or iron rule grows in Israel

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP)--If public opinion
polls and comments from average citizens are
any guide, Israelis are so fed up with their
headers that there is a growing sentiment for dic-
0 tatorship in Israel.
Typical of the feeling were remarks made by
dive passengers riding in a taxi from Jerusalem
Zo Tel Aviv the other night.
THEY WERE heatedly debating what to do
about inflation, strikes, and "those foolish
politicians." What this country needed, everyone
agreed, was a dictatorship.
Chilling words for a country that has cherished
its democratic freedoms through wars,
terrorism, and economic turmoil-a country
Whose people still bear the scars of the Nazi dic-

tatorship of Adolf Hitler.
But the comments reflected widespread
feelings in a country that is losing faith in its
leaders and its political system.
THOSE FEELINGS were underlined by a
recent public opinion poll in which 40.8 percent of
Israelis said they want to "completely change
the political system and set up a strong regime of
leaders independent of the political parties."
The poll, published in the monthly magazine
Monitin by Mina Tzemach, a respected pollster,
stunned the nation and unleashed a torent of
debate. Shalom Rosenfeld, former editor of the
daily Maariv, called it "so serious that the entire
political establishment.. .must put its mind to
wondering what will become of us."

"People have had enough of political parties,
enough of the press, enough of strikes," says
columnist Nahum Barnea in Davar, journal of
the opposition Labor Party. The image Israelis
have in mind is the country's first prime
minister, David Ben-Gurion, who was both a
strong leader and a founder of Israel's
democratic institutions, Barnea said.
DANIEL BLOCH, a leading political commen-
tator, finds a disturbing longing for a leader who
would be expected "to rule in an undemocratic
manner: send the army to break strikes, control
freedom of speech, apply the death penalty to
rapists and murderers... "
Surveying his realm three months before

eneral elections, the Israeli citizen sees an in-
lation rate that reached 132.9 percent last year,
and a rising crime wave whose latest victims are
helpless old people robbed and murdered for
their meager social security allowances.
And when newspapers and TV report all this
bad news, 55.5 percent of those polled by
Tzemach say the media should be restricted
because it is "damaging to the national interest
and harmful to morale."
IN THE PRESENT election campaign, neither
.Prime Minister Menachem Begin nor the Labor
Party's Shimon Peres seems to have inspired
any hope yet among the broad majority of
voters.
Begin is trailing in the polls, but few voters

have forgotten that only four years ago they
ousted the Labor Party, and there is no wave of
enthusiasm to re-elect it so soon.
Leadership, the key issue in this election, is in
a crisis which Prof. Zeev Sternahl, a political
analyst, dates back to the 1973 Mideast War.
Then revered leaders like Golda Meir and Moshe
Dayan were caught embarrassingly unaware by
the Arab armies. "Three prime ministers have
failed since the 1973 war and it is doubtful
whether Israeli democracy can stand a fourth
failure," says Sternhal.
But some Israelis fear that in the long run,
economic chaos and an absence of national
leadership will lead to a slow corrosion of their
democracy.

I

Flora, fauna
reside at
Saguaro plants

Solidarity holds 4-
hour national walkout

By JAMES SCHILL
In 1974 there was a laundromat
located at 207 S. Ashley. Today the
place looks more like a forest
primeval.
Wandering through the cacti, yuc-
ca, succulants, and areca palms, it's
easy to forget where you are.
Overhead a bird cries; water can be
heard somewhere in the distance.
MOST PEOPLE COME to
Saguaro Plants for the flora; others
come for the fauna - the reptiles
and watch cats in particular.
The cats, according to owner
Richard Tuttle, are only pseudo
protectors of the store, although one
might not suspect as much looking
down into a pair of light blue feline
eyes.
Tuttle says he keeps the cats -
Sonya (a Siamese mix), Natasha
(who sleeps in an empty cactus pot),
and Anatole (who likes to go out on
deliveries) - at the store because,
"it's a nice place for them to hang
out." He said the cats are generally
well-behaved, although they knock
over pots and bite some of the plants
now and then.
TRUE TO THEIR name, the wat-
ch cats do a lot of watching. They'
watch the people come in and go out.
They watch the caged birds and
even climb on top of the terrarium
and watch the stor's .collection of
reptiles.

Tuttle says looking after such a
menagerie is like "being father to a
thousand kids."
Besides the trees and plants
thriving in his shop, Tuttle has out-
fitted 25 local restaurants with
foliage. Many of the plants are
leased, and Tuttle said he has to at-
tend to these plants at least once a
week.
THE SECRET to healthy, happy
plants, Tuttle disclosed, lies in
natural cures and preventatives.
Natural care as simple as washing
the plants periodically and watering
with herbal mixtures.
Sharing the familial atmosphere
of the plant shop with the succulants,
birds, cats, and reptiles is Tuttle's
wife, Raven. Raven said she shares
her husband's views concerning a
natual approach to living, and tries
to incoporate them into the hair-
cutting business she conducts in the
store.
Tuttle has been in business six
years, but he said he has not always
been interested in plants. After ob-
taining a Bachelors degree in
psychology, he said he became
disillusioned with psychotherapy in
an institutionalized setting.
He became interested in hor-
ticulture while traveling to the floral
habitats of South America and Asia
- an interest that culminated in a
Masters degree in botany.

From AP and UPI
WARSAW, Poland - Solidarity
paralyzed Poland with a four-hour
national walkout yesterday, then
government and union bargainers
spent the same length of time unsuc-
cessfully trying to find a way to avert
an unlimited general strike next week.
Solidarity leader Lech Walesa told
strikers yesterday, in a break with
talks with Deputy Premier Mieczyslaw
Rakowski, that the union had no inten-
tion of overthrowing the Communist
Party and that it wanted to give
Premier Wojciech Jaruzelski "some
time to restore order."
OFFICIALS OF THE big independent
union said a government commission
probing the incident blamed for the
current crisis - the beating of three
unionists in Bydgoszcz last week -
presented a 13-page report at the
bargaining session.
"We shall be studying it all night,"
Walesa said as he emerged from the
talks. Both sides agreed to reconvene
the talks today.
Solidarity declined to estimate how
many of its estimated 10 million mem-
bers participated in the four-hour war-
ning strike at factories, coal mines and
shipyards. Analysts called it the
biggest coordinated workers' protest in
the 35-year history of the communist
East bloc.
"WE STRIKE TO make clear to
people there is no other way for Poland
than through democratic reforms," a
Solidarity bulletin said. "We strike to
make clear to authorities that
Solidarity is an irrevocable factor of
Polish life.
"We struck four hours today to give
the authorities a chance tp settle thngs

so we don't have the strike for four
weeks,' the possible duration of the
open-ended general strike Solidarity
has scheduled to begin Tuesday.
The national tension of the past few
weeks reached a crescendo yesterday
morning with a wail of factory sirens
heralding the start of the strike. One
word - "Solidarity" -flashed across
television screens and appeared on fac-
tory walls alongside fluttering red-and-
white Polish flags.
THE HALF-DAY "warning" strike
by the Solidarity labor coalition went
off without incident or violence. But the
Soviet Union, whose troops are on ex-
tended Warsaw Pactsmaneuvers in
Poland, said the strike showed
Solidarity to be "anti-socialist and anti-
people."
PAP quoted Walesa as saying after
the meeting that he was hopeful "some
solutions which will be constructive"
would be reached when the talks recon-
vene today.
Rakowski was quoted by the agency
as saying, "I too am convinced that we
should do all we can to reach an
agreement which will restore order in
the country and eliminate this rather
dangerous conflict."
A state televison official was quoted
by Solidarity sources as saying the
government was prepared to withstand
a general strike for 30 days but after
that would "announce martial law."

Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ
SAGUARO PLANTS owner Richard Tuttle sits amid the flora and fauna at
his local greenery shop.

_.
g ,:

a ______________________

Space shuttle takes final test

INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ave a liberty 7617T00
-BARGAIN MATINEES-
WED.SAT. SUN $2.00 til 6 PM
s EK ONLY!
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FILMS
Alternative Action Films - The Jerk, 7, 8:50, 10:40 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - The Warriors, 7, 10:20 p.m., The Wild One, 8:40
p.m., MLB Aud. 4. -
Cinema Guild - Honeysuckle Rose, 7, 9:15 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II- Animation Night, 7, 9 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A.
Mediatrics - North Dallas Forty, 7, 9:30 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Classic Film Theatre - The King of Hearts, 5, 7, 9, 11 p.m., Michigan
Theatre.
The Theosophical Society in Ann Arbor - Esoteric Nature of Music, 3
p.m., Carriage House.
SPEAKERS
Gen. Union of Palestinian Students - "Day of the Land," 7 p.m., Mich.
Union COnf. Rooms 4-6.
PERFORMANCES
The Ark - Children's Concert, Utah Phillips, 2:30 p.m., 1421 Hill.
MET - "A Doll House," 8p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre.
Canterbury Loft - "Sugar Mouth Sam Don't Dance No More," 8 p.m., 332
S. State.
School of Music - "Orpheus in Hades," 8p.m., Power Center.
Residential College - Synge's "The Well of the Saints," 8 p.m., R.C. Aud.,
East Quad.
ASPEM - Concert, The Ann Arbor Consort of Voices, 8 p.m., St. Andrew's
Church.
MISCELLANEOUS
Michigan Association for the Academically Talented-Conference, all
day, Weber's Inn.
School of Art - exhibit, "Metalwork 2," Slusser Art Gallery.
Rec. Sports - Children's Sports-O-Rama, Parents' Day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.,
NCRB.
Lacrosse Club - vs. Notre Dame, noon, Fuller Field.
RUDI - Children's Mini-Festival of India, noon-2 p.m., Ann Arbor Public
Library.
Rec. Sports - "U" Synchronized Swim Club - Michifish Swim Show, 7-10
p.m., Bell Pool.
Exhibit Museum - "Cosmos: The Voyage to the Stars," 10:30 a.m., 11:45
a.m., 1:30, 2:45, 4 p.m., Exhibit Museum Planetarium.
SYDA - workshop, "The Path of Knowledge," all day, 1520 Hill.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of;
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) -
NASA conducted the final major test of
the space shuttle Columbia yesterday
in preparation for a maiden flight that
could come as early as April 10.
The fueling test was delayed for three
hours by a hydrogen leak on a connec-
tor seal linking ground-support
equipment to the orbiter, but the
operation was allowed to proceed
about 1 p.m. EST.
THE TEST INVOLVED loading
526,000 gallons of highly volatile, super-
cold liquid oxygen and hydrogen into
the shuttle's 15-story tank. It was
designed to check the durability of cork
insulation panels on the tank's outer
surface.f
About 32 of the panels, stuck on with a
super glue, were damaged in a similar
operation in January, causing further
delays in the shuttle program, which is
now more than two years behind
schedule.
After a similar test Wednesday,
Launch Operations Director George

Page said a visual inspection "revealed
no significant problems."
A NEW LAUNCH date rides on the
outcome of the tests. A separation of
any of the some 400 panels could delay
the $8 billion program for weeks more.
Technicians will make a thorough
check of the tank during the weekend. If
no major problems are found, a new
launch date - no sooner than April 10 -
is expected to be announced on
Tuesday, officials at the National
Aeronautics and Space Adminstation
said.
Kennedy Space Center spokesman
Mark Hess said the connector seal
where the leak developed is at the point
where ground equipment- which holds
the fueling hoses - attached to the or-
biter. The external tank is fueled
through the orbiter.
A HYDROGEN LEAK through the
seal prevented proper pressurization of
the hydrogen side of the two-cylinder
tank, Hess said. The problem was over-
come by remote control from the laun-

ch operations center.
After the fueling, a team of
technicians wearing flame-retardent
suits began a visual inspection of the
tank's outer surface from a distance of
about 10 feet.
Working from the launch platform
and a gantry, the "ice team" looked
through binoculars and took infrared
photos to detect the presence of any ice
or vapors, which would indicate
separation of insulation from the
aluminum skin.
The tank's skin is critical to the shut-
tle flight because it reduces heat tran-
sfer that could cause excessive boiling
of the propellants. During pre-launch
operations, it helps prevent buildup of
ice from the supercold fuels, ice that
could shake loose and damage the
spacecraft.
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AisoSroeen DAVID KEITH wrneC by GARY DevCOR
Musk by HENRt MANLIINi Lyncsby ALAN and MARILYN ERGMAN
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