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March 26, 1981 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-26

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 26, 1981-Page 3
Former defense head:
Military not a business

By LINDA RUECKERT
The American military cannot be
managed like an ordinary business
because conflicting pressures will
always limit its peacetime efficiency,
former Secretary of Defense Harold
Brown told a business school audience
yesterday.
Speaking to about 500 listeners in
Hale Auditorium, Brown said the
department must always be prepared
for armed conflict and that need ham-
pers its peacetime organizing ability.
"INDIVIDUAL corporate mistakes
can have catastrophic financial effects
for many people, wrong domestic
policies can damage the country, but
mistaken defense policies can kill us
all," Brown said.
"In that sense," he continued, "the
Defense Department cannot be
managed like a business."
Brown, a physicist and former
president of the California Institute of
Technology, said the complexity of the
Defense Department prevents it from
being measured like a business.
THE ARMED forces, unlike a
business, must be prepared to deter

armed conflict and fight if necessary,
he said. The Defense Department must
also maintain and repair a much wider
variety of equipment than any private
business, ranging from aircraft
carriers to light bulbs.
Brown advocated more authority for
military departments in the
management of national security in-
terests, but stopped short of endorsing a
resumption of the draft. "Compulsive
military service would create a much
closer identity" between the civilian
and military populations, Brown said,
but "whether that identity would be
positive or negative is another
question."
Commenting on his experience as
secretary, Brown said, "It's no surprise
that every defense secretary comes in-
to office declaring that he will cut back,
save on waste, and organize and
manage better. But each-including
myself-has left office at least as
frustrated at what he has failed to get
done as pleased with what he has ac-
complished improving management
and efficiency."
IN A BRIEF question and answer
session following his speech, Brown
said he did not foresee a war between
the United States and the Soviet Union
as long as both sides maintain updated
military capabilities.
"We must have sufficient military
capability such that the Soviets will not
expect to win a war," Brown said.

When asked about U.S. foreign policy
toward South Africa, Brown said, "The
Soviets may be able to rally the black
majority (in South Africa) against the
U.S. if the U.S. is seen as upholding the
status quo. The U.S. must continue to
put pressure on South Africa for further
liberalization."
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Daily Photo by DAVID HARRIS

Faceless pro estors
Two demonstrators cover their faces with signs yesterday at noon during a rally on the Diag sponsored by the
American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee. The protest was held to call attention to a Palestinian who faces ex-
tradition to Israel.

a _____________________________________________________________

HAPPENINGS-
FILMS
A-V Services - Are You Doing this for Me, Doctor, or am I Doing this for
You?, 12:10p.m., SPH IIAud.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op -The Last Wave, 7 p.m., Mad Max, 9 p.m., Angell
Hall Aud. A.
HCinema Guild -Andrei Rublev, 7p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Mediatrics - Umbeurtof, 7, 9 p.m., Nat. Sci Aud.
Classic Film Theatre - Lenny, 4, 7, 9 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Hellenic University Society - Z, 7p.m., Angell Hall Aud. B.
SPEAKERS'
Urban Planning - Helmalata Dandekar, "Third World Urban Develop-
; ment," 11a.m.,1040Dana.
CJS - Chiyuki Kumakura, "Coin Locker Babies," noon, Lane Hall Com-
" mons.
Museum of Anthropology - David Wilson, "Surveying the Searing of San-
ta: A Study of Pre-Hispanic Settlement Patterns and Defense Systems on the
North Peruvian Coast," noon, 2009 Museums.
Computing Center - Chalk Talk, "Magnetic Tape Utility Programs,"
12:10 p.m.,1011 NUBS.
CHGD - "Current Trends in Funding: What Reviewers Look For," 2
p.m., Henderson Room, Michigan League.
Chemical Engineering - John Seinfek, "Mathematical Modeling of Air
® Pollution," 3:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
School of Education - James Bryan, "First Impressions, Ingratiation
Tactics, and Learning Disabled Children," 4 p.m., 1211 SEB.
" Kelsey Museum - William Childs, "History and Greek Classical Art," 4
p.m., 203 Tappan Hall.
LASC - Art Boyd, "Central America: Regional Aspects," 7:30 p.m.,
Angell Hall Aud. C.
National Lawyers Guild - Richard Soble, "Political Surveillance in
Michigan," 7:30 p.m., 116 Hutchins Hall.
PIRGIM - Adrienne Seko, "What You Should Know About Toxic Shock
Syndrome," 7:30 p.m., Stockwell Blue Lounge.
Armenian Student Association, International Christian Student
Association - Paren Avedikian, "Armenian Liturgy," 9 p.m., Henderson
Room, Michigan League.
Hellenic University Society - Vasilis Vasilikos, "Political Violence in
Countries Under Oppression," 9 p.m., Aud. B Angell Hall.
Michigan Robotics Research Circle - Robert Tesar, "National Needs in
Manufacturing Technology R & D," 7 p.m., Chrysler Center.
Michigan Professors for Peace in the Middle East - Amos Perlmutter,
"The Reagan Administration: American Policy in the Middle East," 8 p.m.,
Rackham W. Conf. Room.
CULS - Prof. Mario Barrera, "Race and Class in the Southwest," 8 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.
MEETINGS
Botticelli Game Players -noon, Dominick's.
Medical Center Bible Study -12:30 p.m., F2230 Mott Library.
Campus Weight Watchers - 5:30 p.m., League Project Room.
Inter-varsity Christian Fellowship - 7 p.m., meetings at the League and
the Union.
Skydivers Club - First Jump Course, 7 p.m., 2084 E. Engin.
AA -8:30 p.m., N2815 U. Hosp., 2nd level, NPI.
PERFORMANCES
Guild House - Poetry reading by Sybil Kein and Judith McCombs, 7:30
p.m., 802 Monroe.
Office of Major Events - REQ Speedwagon, 8 p.m., Crisler Arena.
UAC - Soundstage Coffeehouse, 8 p.m., U. Club, Union.
MET - "A Doll House," 8 p.m., Mendelssohn Theater.
Canterbury Loft - "The Woods," 8p.m., 332 S. State.
Ark - Irish pipist Romas O'Canainn, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
MISCELLANEOUS
WCBN - "The Salsa Show," 7 p.m., 88.3 FM.
MEEKREH - Felafel Study Break, 10:30 p.m., Mosher-Jordan Lounge.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of;
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.

'U' orchestra tour
will lack viola player

By CAROL CHALTRON
The University Symphony Or-
chestra will tour Europe this summer
without a twelfth viola player following
conflicts over audition procedures bet-
ween the orchestra's director and some
violists.
The violists complained last week
when Conductor Gustav Meier
auditioned a non-University violist to
fill a vacant chair for the orchestra's
two-week European trip. The student
musicians maintain that Meier should
have held open auditions for University
students in the less-experienced
Philharmonic Orchestra.
MEIER COUNTERED that he is
familiar enough with the Philharmonic
musicians to know that none of them
are capable of learning the necessary
new material before April 28, when the
orchestra leaves for France. He
auditioned a friend of an orchestra
violinist Iast Wednesday, but decided
not to hire her.
As a result, the twelfth viola chair,
left vacant after a violist decided not to
go on the tour, will remain unfilled. A
twelfth violist is not considered essen-
tial for the trip.
CLAIMING THAT Meier's action was
"incredibly unprofessional," according
to violist Nancy Nehring, the violists
presented the conductor with a petition
last Wednesday asking that he hold

ripen auditions and give preference to
University students.
Meier "is very unfair when it comes
to audition procedures," said another
violist, Charlet Ness.
According to the violists, Meier told
them that they were reacting
prematurely to the special audition.
The conductor said that if the non-
University musician had turned out to
be a fine player, he would have then
held competitive auditions.
Meier only auditioned the violist
because he though she might be able to
learn the material for the four different
programs that will be given on the tour,
according to the violists.
(Continued from Page 1)
Jackson, an area equalization director.
Jordan also has called on businesses
around the state to close their shops
May 19 - the date of a special election
on a proposal forged by Gov. William
Milliken and the Legislature that would
cut property taxes in half, but
significantly raise the sales tax.
State officials call it a tax shift, but
Jordan said "it's a shaft."

WE'RE
cJNTNG
oN
So send
will still

Attention
Student Organiation Leaders:
S.O.A.P. anxiously awaits your re-
sponses to their survey-we need your in-
formation and ideas.

in your survey and you
qualify for the drawing.

Any questions call:
763-5900

k n,,u M.R a
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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHi[GAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC OPERATH EATER PRESENTS

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A
BY IACQU

Rising crime rate
snarls early paroles

(Continued from Page 1)
risks, noting the 1,000 prisoners being
freed can be expected to commit 150
felonies in a year, but stressed the state
has little choice in the matter.'
Noting a court order requires the
state to avoid overcrowding, he said
"It's not a question of whether we're
going to release people. It's a question
of how we're going to do it."
THE EMERGENCY law was passed
last fall after voters rejected a
proposed .1 percentage point income
tax increase to fund new prison con-
struction.
When the prison system exceeds its
capacity for 30 days, the law requires
the Corrections Commission and the
governor to declare a state of emergen-
cy and reduce minimum prison terms
by 90 days. Backers stress prisoners
still must face parole hearings before
winning release.
If the prison population is not within
legal limits within 90 days, another sen-
tence reductionmust be made.
JOHNSON SAID the state system has
been over capacity for 22 consecutive
days.
He said the addition of a new 440-bed
facility and two 80-bed camps within a
year should ease the situation, but
noted there has been "a significant in-
crease in crime right now in the state,

particularly serious violent crime."
Johnson called the crowding law "an
excellent short-term solution as the
prison population begins to burgeon but
not along-term solution."
"There is a limit to how many times
officials can reduce sentences and still
retain a responsible public policy," he
said.
Johnson stressed the law only moves
up prisoner's release dates by three
months - a fraction of most sentences
- and does not affect those with man-
datory minimum sentences.

Enjoy a hu
Orpheus,
musician,
recapture
Pluto, the
The score
Offenbach
and witty.

C O M PERA
ES OFFENBACH
amorous tale of
the mythical Greek
in his attempt to
his wife from
fiend of Hades.
is one of
's most tuneful
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