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March 25, 1981 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-25

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age 8-Wednesday, March 25, 1981 -The Michigan Daily
Polish labor union calls
for more protest strikes

From UPI and AP
BYDGOSZCZ, Poland - Angered
by police beatings, the Solidarity labor
union voted yesterday to call two
protest strikes that Communist Party
chief Stanislaw Kania said could lead to
"catastrophe" and "self-destruction."
Solidarity officials said a four-hour
warning strike would be held on Friday,
followed by a one-day general strike
next Tuesday to protest a police assault
on union officals in the northwestern
city of Bydgoszcz last week.
KANIA SAID Solidarity's call for
strikes "cannot be interpreted other-
wise than a call for self-annihilation."
Three persons were hospitalized
following the attack that thrust the
nation into its -worst labor crisis since
the summer strikes that spawned
Poland's independent labor movement.
Solidarity, whose leadership met
through the night yesterday, said the
strikes could be called off if the gover-

nment and the union reached
agreement before Friday on a set of
new demands stemming from the
Bydgoszcz incident. A meeting betwen
high-level officials from both sides was
scheduled for today.
THE CALL FOR A general strike
revived fears of possible Soviet inter-
vention to crush the independent union
movement, and military maneuvers by
Warsaw Pact nations continued in
Poland and its neighbors.
In the Netherlands, a summit con-
ference of the European Common
Market warned against any interven-
tion. A closing declaration issued at the
conference in Maastricht said Poland
"has shown that she is capable of facing
her internal problems herself" and
"should continue to do so in a peaceful
manner and without outside interferen-
ce. It is also in the interest of stability in
Europe."
Solidarity leader Lech Walesa, still

regarded as a national hero for his role
in the August strikes, prevailed over
pro-strike militants and came out with
a compromise to stage brief warning
strikes.
"THIS IS NO TIME for quarrels
because we can lose," Walesa told his
fellow Solidarity leaders.
"Rumors have reached me that a
state of emergency could be introduced
by the government tomorrow," he said.
"The question is whether or not we
can avoid full-scale confrontation."
"IT MUST BE A strong blow. Cities
must look as if it were a national
funeral," one Solidarity official said.
Over the weekend, Warsaw television
showed footage of East bloc troops on
maneuver in southern Poland and other
Soviet bloc countries, apparently to
remind Solidarity that the Kremlin is
capable of intervening.

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Waterbeds
to aid
premature
infants'
incubation

CHICAGO (AP)-A company is
donating 200 tiny waterbeds to Chicago-
area hospitals after doctors found that
premature babies who lie on waterbeds
in their incubators grow fasted and ex-
perience fewer breathing and heart
problems.
Warm and gently rocking, the heated
incubator waterbeds also simulate the
floating environment of the mother's
womb.
Dr. Henry Mangurten, director of the
newborn intensive-care unit at
Lutheran General Hospital in Park
Ridge, is enthusiastic about incubator
waterbeds for high-risk infants. He has
been experimenting with a dozen

waterbeds in his 30-incubator unit for
two months and plans a more detailed '
study.
"We've found that the beds help
premature babies with irregular
breathing and heartbeats," Mangurten
said. "The incidence of these episodes
goes down significantly-they are
fewer and less severe."~
He said waterbeds also keep pressure
off critical joints that stick out in infan-
ts born eight to 12 weeks prematurely.
Lutheran General is among 24
hospitals in the area that will get 200 in-
cubator waterbeds from Peppers
Waterbeds.

I Archbishop honare
Students attending a candlelight mass in honor of slain El Salvadoran Archbis
Mary's Church in a procession to the Federal Building.
HOUSE SUBCOMMIT TE E OKS ADDITION
El Salvador aid a~

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WASHINGTON (UPI) - A House
subcommittee yesterday narrowly ap-
proved an additional $5 million in
military aid for El Salvador over
charges that the program amounted for
a new Vietnam-era "Gulf of Tonkin"
resolution.
The House foreign operations sub-
committee voted 8-7 to reprogram $5
million in military aid for the
Salvadoran junta as part of the fiscal
1981 budget. The amount brings El
Salvador's military aid program for the
current fiscal year to just over $35
million.
THE 15-DAY deadline Congress had
to reject the $5 million in military aid
expired March 17, but the subcommit-

tee headed by Rep. Clarence Long (D-'
Md.) asked for another week. The
respective Senate subcommittee en-
dorsed the program by taking no action
at all.
The administration yesterday also
proposed sending the junta an ad-
ditional $63.5 million in economic aid
this year to bolster political reform
program and help rebuild the war-torn
country.
"IT IS AN EXPRESSION of faith in
the government," State Department
spokesman William Dyess said.
With the subcommittee vote and the
additional aid disclosed by the ad-
ministration, the total U.S. aid for El

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
shop Oscar Arnulfo Romero leave St.
A L $5 MIL LION:
Lpproved
Salvador in fiscal 1981 amounts to $161.5
million - $126.5 million in economic aid
and $35 million in military assistance.
On Monday, the State Department
told Congress the 1982 economic and
military program for El Salvador
comes to $101 million -- $35 million in
development assistance, $40 million in
security-related economic support fun-
ds and $26 million for military aid and
training.
In next year's budget, El Salvador is
the largest Latin American recipient of
U.S. aid, with about 20 percent of the
$478 million in total aid requested for
the entire region.
~peals for
ir threat
Messages to Brezhnev and President
Reagan, coupled with appeals to other
leaders and doctors worldwide, were
issued at the conclusion of a four-day
meeting of the International Physicians
for the Prevention of Nuclear War at a$
rural Virginia retreat near Washington.
Asked why he thought the group's ef-
forts might have any more impact than
those of other anti-nuclear groups,
Chazov, a cardiologist, replied through
his interpreter: "They do not have ac-
cess to people's hearts like we
physicians do."
"Nuclear war would be a human and
environmental disaster ...
threatening the very survival of
civilization," Dr. Jack Geiger of the
City College of New York said at a news

conference announcing the appeal.
IN A NUCLEAR war, the classical
concepts of winning and losing do not
exist, said Dr. Frank Sommers of the
University of Toronto, adding: "We
must find new ways of thinking, new
ways of resolving conflicts. This is the
challenge."
Geiger said the possibility of a tac-
tical nuclear war with limite
casualties is about as 'likely as a
medical opinion that death is rever-
sable. The chances of a holocaust in-
crease with the number of nuclear
weapons, he said, estimating there are
50,000 such weapons worldwide.
Geiger said the risk is enhanced
through design error, terrorism and the
proliferation of nuclear weapons to
irresponsible governments.
DR. BERNARD LOWN of the Har-
vard School of Public Health noted that
in the event of nuclear war, doctors
could be little help. Many of them would
be killed, he said, and the survivors
would be overwhelmed by the number
of injured.
People may not seem as concerned
because they find such a war
unimaginable, he said. But, Lown said,
physicians don't suffer this "atrophy of
the imagination" because they see
what can happen through the patients
they treat.
STEAK & ALE
of Plymouth Is

#iii! i i i! /
7 7
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Physicians' panel ap
prevention of nuclea

WASHINGTON (AP) - A panel of
doctors from 10 nations, including
Leonid Brezhnev's personal physician,
appealed to Soviet and American
leaders yesterday to embrace preven-
tion as the only cure for an epidemic of
nuclear weaponry they called the "far
greater threat" to life than any disease.

When someone is ill, noted Evgueni
Chazov of the Soviet Academy of Scien-
ces, he looks to the physician to help
him. "And now," said the Soviet
president'sddoctor, "wesay it is im-
,essary to save mankind. Life and
nuclear war are incompatible."
"MANKIND CAN DIE," he declared.

MSA Allocation Deadlines
Attention recognized student organizations:
Allocations of MSA funds to beneficial student projects will be '
voted on by MSA on April 14th. In order to be considered for
the April allocations, funding request forms must be turned in-
to the MSA office by 5:00 on Friday, March 27. This will be
MSA's final allocation ,of the school year, and summer
allocations will be limited, so act now if money is needed for
projects during April or during the summer.
NOTE: All groups requesting MSA funds are required to attend a
budget priorities workshop sponsored by SOAP (Student Organization
Activities and Programming). These workshops will take place on
Wednesday, March 25 and Thursday, March 26, from 4:00 to 5:30 in Con-
ference Room 5 of the Union.
For more information, call the
Michigan Student Assembly (763-3241)

tiN Brittonia and Red Eye. Jr
~Wanti To Be Me' Juniorsc
~ ON SALE THURS., MARCH 26 1
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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC OPERATHEATER PRESENTS

IN

A

C

ENBACH
tale of
hical Greek
ttempt to
g from
Hades.
f t
tuneful
ii tr

BY IACQUES OFFS

Enjoy a humorous
Orpheus, the myt
musician, in his al
recapture his wife
Pluto, the fiend of
The score is one o
Offenbach's most
and witty.

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