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March 25, 1981 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-25

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Ninety-One Years
of
Editorial Freedom

Ak igan

1E aiI

SPRINGY'
Clear today with highs in
the low 50s.

Vol. XCI, No. 141 Copyright 1981, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, March 25, 1981 Ten Cents Eight Pages

Reagan won't speak at
May 2 commencement

Inflation

By BARRY WITT
Contrary to rumors from administrators and
students and despite an invitation from the Univer-
sity, President Reagan will not speak at the May 2
commencement.
White House aides confirmed Reagan had been
asked, but Assistant University Vice President Jim
Shortt said late yesterday that Reagan declined the
offer.
Recommendations for commencement speakers
come from the Honorary Degree Committee, ac-
cording to Vice President for State Relations
Richard Kennedy. The Regents must approve any
recommendation for an honorary degree or com-
mencement speaker.

"Many times (the committee) gets suggestions
from the Regents themselves, or students, faculty,
or staff," Kennedy said, "but all (the nominations)
eventually go through the Honorary Degree Com-
mittee."
Rumors had circulated in recent weeks among
administrators, faculty and students that the
president would speak at graduation ceremonies.
The committee will now proceed to offer the spot
to another speaker.
Although Reagan isn't coming to the University, a
predecessor will be here this Friday. Former
President Gerald Ford will be present at the Ford
Library dedication.

jumps

to

12.1%
annual rate

Reagan
.. . refuses commencement offer

I1
Reseach -
fundingR '
cus o i
'U' socia
<4. ,

scte nces
By JANET RAE
Social science research at the
Jniversity will suffer significantly
from the Reagan administration budget
cuts, but support for engineering and
the life sciences will increase, national
and local officials said yesterday.
The National Science Foundation, the
largest research grant contributor to
the University last year, will cut social,
economic, and behavioral science
research funds, but will step up resear-
ch grants to rathematics, engineering
and the life sciences, NSF spokesman
Jack Renirie said.
UNDER THE proposals, however,
science and engineering education fun-
ding, which includes new graduate
fellowships, grants fore curriculum
development, and support for
educational groups such as Women in
Science, would be virtually eliminated,
Renirie said.
Cutbacks in grants from the National
Aeronautics and Space Administration
will also take a slice out of University
space research, Space Physics Resear-
" ch Lab Director George Carignan said.
Including inflationary increases, that
reduction could go as high as 40 per-
cent.
NSF provides 20 percent of the
federal funds for higher education
research activities nationwide. Renirie
said the foundation is scheduled to
receive a 25 percent cut from funds
originally proposed by the Carter ad-
ministration.
See PROPOSALS, Page 2

Doily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
MORE THAN 400 members of the University community crowded on the Diag yesterday in a rallyto protest U.S.
military aid to El Salvador. The protesters marched down Liberty St. and continued the rally at the Federal building.
More than.00 atend
DiagEl alvador rall
By BETH ALLEN Speaking at the federal building, Head slammed the
Several political groups gathered forces yesterday to policies of the Salvadoran junta and U.S. involvement in El
protest U.S. intervention in El Salvador, in one of the biggest Salvador's military.
rallies this year. ~ "IT'S A QUESTION of self-determinism," Head said. "The
More than 400 people showed up at the rally, including the Salvadoran people should be the ones to decide what to do
entire Communications 290 class which was covering the with their lives."
event. According to Head, the LASC will be sending more than
THE PROTEST, coordinated by the Latin American $1100 raised in a bucket drive Monday to the Revolutionary
Solidarity Committee, started on the Diag and moved to the Democratic Front, the leftist guerrilla organization opposed
Federal Building. The demonstration was one of a series of to the junta.
protests across the country on the anniversary of the The LASC focused on U.S. intervention, but other group
assassination of Salvadoran leftist sympathizer and Catholic representatives stress the importance of the fight against the
Archbishop Oscar Romero. junta.
"We want to raise people's consciousness on what's going "We must do all we can to suppport the Salvadoran
on down there (in El Salvador)," said LASC spokesman rebels," said Steve Conn of the Revolutionary Workers
Louis Head. League. "In their hand lies the future of El Salvador."

From UPI and AP
WASHINGTON - Despite
moderating food prices, a huge jump in
gasoline and fuel oil rates pushed the
nation's cost of living up last month at
an annual rate of 12.1 percent, the
government said yesterday.
The latest figures reversed the
somewhat encouraging performance of
the previous month. The annual rate of
inflation had slowed to 9.1 percent in
January, the lowest level since last
summer. The Labor Department said a
worker with three dependents saw
spendable earnings erode 1.5 percent in
February.
THE DEPARTMENT reported all
consumer prices advanced by 1 percent
last month. Without energy prices, the
index edged up only 0.3 percent.
Gasoline surged 6.6 percent, the
largest one-month increase in a year,
and fuel oil costs jumped 8.5 percent.
The acceleration was due primarily to
President Reagan's decontrol of
domestic oil and to price increasespby
the Organization of Petroleum Expor-
ting Countries, said Labor Department
economist Patrick Jackman.
That doesn't tell the whole story, one
government economist said.
"WLTHi DECQNTROL, oil companies
saw an opportunity to raise prices,
even with a glut of gasoline," he said,
asking not to be identified. "They used
decontrol partly as a rationalization."
Administration officials say gasoline
and home heating oil prices have risen
10-12 cents since Reagan's Jan. 22 order
to lift remaining controls on domestic
crude.
Had energy prices, including those
for gasoline and home heating fuel, not
gone up at all, the yearly inflation rate
reflected in February would have been
only 3.9 percent, according to Labor
Department analyst Jesse Thomas.
JACKMAN SAID most of the impact
from decontrol has worked through the
economy, and price increases should
subside. "We're already seeing some
price cutbacks in March," henoted.
That view was echoed by Murray

265-
260-
255-
250-
245"

Weidenbaum, chairman of Reagan's
Council of Economic Advisers, who told
Congress he forsees more stable energy
costs as soon as next month.
However, that turnabout likely will
be frustrated by a resurgence in food and
housing costs - the items that have
helped moderate inflation this year,
Jackman said.
GROCERY STORE food prices were
unchanged last month, after declining
at a seasonally adjusted 0.4 percent clip
in January, the Labor Department
said.
-Consumer
Price
Index Base Period
I 1967=100

240"
235 MAMJJASONDJF
1980.81
Source: Dept. of Labor .

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A professional
acting company:
Just what the
dept, ordered

By ANNE G
Walter Eysselinck is wor
theatre under the Reagan a
pains the chairman of the Un
tment to see his favorite artis
But Eysselinck' brightens
Michigan Ensemble Theatre
professional theatre company
TONIGHT'S performancec
House at the Lydia Mendelss
debut of MET.
The company's production
of the professional stage un
leading roles. A few gradu
newly approved Master of F
ting will appear in supporti
union actors are normally no
in union or "professional" p
allowed an exception for ME
under the auspices of the Univ
Despite the fact that stude
and assisting in the technica
Eysselinck explained that ME

pany.Eysselinck said. "I think that for undergraduates,
"MORE AND more graduate schools in theatre are education should come first and professional training
ried about the future of moving towards professionalizing their work. As a second."
dministration. It clearly result, the need for a resident program becomes The first resident professional theatre program at
iversity's theatre depar- stronger," said Eysselinck. the University was the Association of Producing Ar-
tic medium threatened. "There are three reasons why this is important. tists organized by director Ellis Rabb in 1962. The
at the mention of the First of all,:the faculty members need an outlet for APA later was taken over by a different group of ar-
e, the University's new creative work. A writer, a designer, or a musician tists and became the APA-Phoenix, which produced
y. needs to be alone somewhere to work, but a teacher of its last show in 1973. Since that time, the only com-
of Henrik Ibsen's A Doll acting or directing can't afford to go for a number of pletely professional productions on campus have
Sohn Theatre marks the weeks without work. been from the Best of Broadway series, which
"Secondly, students have to see their teachers as features productions by touring companies that visit
s will feature members artists at work. And thirdly, students need to intern in Ann Arbor for only a few performances. With the
pion, Actor's Equity, in professional productions, and to learn from creation of MET, the Best of Broadway series will be
iate students from the professional actors." reduced from four shows to three.
me Arts program in ac- ANOTHER ADVANTAGE'of having performers- THE POTENTIAL for a resident professional ac-
ng roles. Although non- in-residence, Eysselinck added, is that they will ting company in Ann Arbor has been widely
)t allowed to participate widen the range of instruction offered by the depar- recognized by members of the theatre community.
productions, Equity has tment. Students will have the opportunity to study According to Eysselinck, Tyrone Guthrie, who was
T since the company is under MET members. instrumental in forming the Shakespeare Festival in
versity. The undergraduate program, however, will not be Stratford, Canada and the Guthrie Theatre in Min-
ents will be performing affected by MET. "I am interested in maintaining a neapolis, once said Ann Arbor was the ideal com-
l aspects of production, liberal arts tradition on the undergraduate level munity in which to organize a professional theatre.
ET is not a student com- rather than a BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts)," See THEATRE, Pages5

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TODAY
5, 4, 3,2, 1,..register!
HE COUNTDOWN for registering for spring-
summer and fall terms has begun. Last week,
spring-summer time schedules were out, ready to
be picked up by students in Angell Hall. Fall time
schedules, course guides, and "Course Encounters" guides,
are now being distributed to students. The last member of
the registration scenario-student verification forms-will
arrive somewhere around the 28th of March. D

I

at least one million points higher than the previous record.
Petermann ke t alert during the cosmic battle by listening
to records, talking to assistants, and "drinking lots of
soda." Petermann, a pre-med student, recommended using
Asteroids to relieve study pressures. "It sounds a littleI
strange, but it's really good for stress," he explained.
"You're in your own world. It's like a drug." Petermann's
own Asteroids addiction costs an average of 20 dollars a
week. E
Pop star prosecution

could appear and tell of their personal losses from the
alleged tape scam, although Just how much sympathy the
economic losses of multi-millionaire pop stars can draw
from the jury remains doubtful. Prosectors declined to say
which star would get top billing by being called to the stand.
first. E
Nroisy boys
Some researchers at Ohio State feel that at least one of

children talking at once. A discouraging note to collegiate
rock fans is that music played at full stereo level can run as
much as 115 decibels, according to Psychology Prof.
William Stebbins of the Kresge Hearing Institute. This is
far above the 90-decibel danger level set by industries for
factory workers. So don't necessarily expect a higher GPA
from studying with Devo at full blast even if you are
male. -.

,

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