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March 21, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-21

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Page 2-Saturday, March 21, 1981-The Michigan Daily
'U' ADMINISTRA TORS PRESENT 'OBITUAR Y'
Financialwoes loomahead
(Continued from Page 1 )

natural science and energy funds stand
to be cut.
ONLY THE DEFENSE Department.
research budget will remain intact, he
said.
. The information presented was
almost too much for one Regent. As
Frye neared the end of his remarks, he
said, "I have just one further com-
ment." But Regent Deane Baker (R-
Ann Arbor) interrupted the vice
president, saying, "That's quite
enough."
Vice President for University
Relations and Development Michael
Radock was the only administrator
with 100 percent good news for the
Regents. Radock reported the Univer-
sity matching gift program ranks at the
top of all public institutions.
FRYE PREFACED HIS remarkson
future problems in the University,
budget with a summary of steps being.
taken to keep current budget in balan-
ce.
"We are proceeding as openly and as
publicly as possible both with respect to
the goals (of retrenchment) and to
faculty and student participation,"
Frye said.
But he warned that present retren-
chment plans will not cover all of the
University's financial problems. On a
slightly more positive note, he said the
overall amount of retrenchment will be
"relatively of modest proportion."
DIRECTOR OF Financial Aid Har-
vey Grotrian said approximately one-
third of the aid received by University
students comes from federal sources.
Under Reagan's revised Guaranteed

Student Loan program, "80 percent of
our current recipients would be
ineligible," Grotrian said.
Frye said he still sees the Univer-
sity's situation as manageable, but is
afraid "unnecessary anxiety may
develop in the community," in response
to retrenchment.

by potential magnitude of the problem,
suggested some directions for ad-
ministrators to take in handling the
situation.
Concerning financial aid, Regent
Sarah Power (D-Ann Arbor) asked the
administrators to "communicate to the
student body some parameters of (the

education."
Power also expressed her concern
that the administration articulate its
goals for any long-range changes to the
University community.
REGENT THOMAS Roach (D-
Saline) encouraged administrators to
"stay away from shared poverty
among academic units," when making
budget decisions.
He said he recognizes that different
schools have different needs-in terms
of enrollment trends, society's needs,
and other factors-requiring increases
in funds for some and decreases in
others.
Frye responded, "We still have to
build an adequate plan for dealing with
the problem between the major units."
Chancellors of the Flint and Dear-
born campuses reported budget
problems more serious than those for
the Ann Arbor campus. President
Shapiro .said for the first time the
University may consider using
separate salary increase programs for
each campus.
In other action, the Regents approved
the appointment of Prof. James Duder-
stadt as dean of the College of
Engineering. He will assume the,
position May 1 for a five-year term.

Harris
gets 15

Such anxiety could harm the Univer-
sity more than the cuts themselves, he
warned.
THE REGENTS, somewhat shocked

student aid situation) to try and avoid a
kind of catastrophic situation that could
develop in June when people are
thinking of hoping to continue their

years

for

(Jliurdi nritp 'ErtcEE

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated press and
United Press internati.nal reports
Coal talks break down;
miners stage wildcat strikes
More than 11,000 coal miners defied their union leaders and staged wildcat
walkouts in five states yesterday on the brink of next week's threatened
nationwide soft coal strike.
"Once the talks broke down in Washington everybody just walked off the
job," said Earl Ellis, a miner in Boone county, W. Va. "They said they
weren't coming back until August."
Government officials in coal-producing states prepared for a nationwide
strike, now considered a virtual certainty.
United Mine Workers President Sam Church said in a press conference
yesterday an attempt to resume bargaining with the coal industry has
failed.
He urged all 160,000 UMW workers to stay on the job until the midnight
Thursday strike deadline and said the industry has no intention of settling
the contract without a strike.
"What all this means is that this strike on March 27 could very possibly be
even longer than the 111-day strike the last time around," Church said.
Reagan tells Japan U.S. auto
industry vital to economy
'In an apparent attempt to let Japan know he is serious about restricting
car imports, President Reagan told former Japanese Prime Minister Takeo
Fukuda yesterday the domestic auto industry is vital to the American
economy.
Reagan has not yet said publicly whether he will ask Japan to restirt car
exports to the United States. But administration officials hae made clear
the president sees no other way to aid financially ailing Detroit auto firms.
Fukuda said through an interpreter he fears for peace because "the world
situation today is very much like the world situation back in the 1930s."
Fukuda also said he is confident "that through our very friendly
discussions, these matters will indeed be resolved."
Launch pad death investigated
One of the four space shuttle technicians who survived a launch pad ac-
cident said yesterday his crew had been given official clearance to enter the
airless chamber that snuffed out the life of one of his co-workers.
Government and industry boards began investigations into the death, and
officials said the inquiries could take "weeks or months" but would not delay
the maiden voyage in April.
During Thurday's dress-rehearsal for the launch, five technicians went in-
to an engine compartment that had been filled with nitrogen to reduce fire
danger. Officals said the 15-square-foot compartment should not still have
contained nitrogen when the "all clear" was sounded. '
They said they have not determined why the "all clear" was given.
Milwaukee firemen walk out
Milwaukee firefighters angered by rejection of a settlement that ened a
walkout earlier this month went on strike again, leaving department super-
visors and National Guardsmen to battle a fire in a large apartment complex
yesterday..
The renewed walkout was touched off Thursday night when a Common
Council committee rejected a tentative agreement giving the firefighters
pay parity with police, and the full council refused to take up the matter until
next week.
About 300 Guardsmen were activated, and an additional 300 were put on
standby alert. Preparations for calling up the Guardsmen had been iitiated
earlier in the week when policemen threatened to strike.
City emergency government coordinator Danial Gracz said dozens of -
people were responding to Mayor Henry Maier's call for neighborhood fire
watch volunteers. About 400 people responded when Maier sinstituted a
similar force during a 1973 firemen's strike.
Charges against 3 parties
dismissed in Enquirer suit
A judge yesterday refused to dismiss Carol Burnett's $10 million libel suit
against the National Enquirer, but removed the tabloid's editor, a gossip
columnist, and the distributing company as defendants in the action.
Testimony in the case ended abruptly Thursday. Jurors, who were given
yesterday off, are scheduled to begin deliberations following final argumen-
ts on Monday.
Attorneys met Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Peter Smith yesterday to
discuss jury instructions and to argue motions, including the Enquirer's bid

to dismiss the action involving a gossip item suggesting Burnett was drunk
and disorderly in an exclusive Washington restaurant.
I.

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ST. MARY'S CHAPEL
(Catholic) .
331 Thompson--663-0557.
Weekly Masses:
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
(after 10:30 upstairs and downstairs).
12:00 noon, 5:00 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
_ North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms).
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.--662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus Ministry Program
Campus Minister-Carl Badger
COLLEGE STUDENTS FELLOWSHIP
Activities: Sunday morning coffee
hour in between Services in French
Room..
Bible Study on Tuesday evenings at
7:30 p.m. in the Founders Room.
College Student's :breakfasthn Thur-
sday mornings at 8:;00a.m. in the Fren-
ch Room.
Worship Service-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
College Student Fellowship at 4:00
p.m. in the French Room
** *

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
X20 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:.
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for March 22: "Patience is
Virtue" by Dr. Gerald R. Parker.
Sunday: 3-6 p.m. Family Lent Event.
5:00 p.m. Pancake Supper.
7:00 p.m. Evening Worship in San-
ctuary.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland Y
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors: Rose McLean
and Carol Bennington
S* *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron,
Pastor, Jitsu Morikawa
10:00 a.m.-"Scandal of the Cross."
7:00 p.m. Lenten Service.
1:s00 a.m.-Sunday School (for all
ages).
American Baptist Campus
Foundation
All students and faculty are invited to
attend worship service at 10 a.m. in the
sanctuary and Sunday School Classes
at 11 a.m. in the Guild House.-
Theology Discussion Group every
Thursday at 6 p.m.
(Complimentary brunch on second
Sunday of each month.)
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the Christians
fteformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship "Repen-
tance."
6:00 p.m. Evening Worship, "Lenten
Study of the Beatitudes."
Wednesday: 10:00 p.m. Evening
Prayers.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-
LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship Service at 10:30
Sunday 7:00 p.m. Program; "The
Church and the Changing Family."
Wednesday 5:30 p.m. Agape Meal.
Tues. 7-9 pm "Faith, Science, & the
Future."
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Choir Practice
Thurs. 12-1 p.m. "Squaretable" lunch
at L.O.L.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday Worship: 9:15 a.m. and 10:30
a. m.
Lenten Midweek Service Wednesday
7:30 p.m.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE,
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Christian Education-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
"Time of Meeting"-6:40 p.m.
.* *
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
301 North Ingalls
(two blocks north of Rackham
Graduate School)
668-6113
Sunday Service-2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* * *
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOAR
1917 Washtenaw (corner of Berkshire)
Sunday Services at 10:30 a:m.
Coffee Hour and conversation after
services.
Child Care available
Kenneth W. Phifer-Minister f665-6158

murder
WHITE PLANS, N.Y. (AP)-Jean
Harris was sentenced yesterday to a
minimum term of 15 years to life in
prison for the love-triangle slaying of
Scarsdale Diet author Dr. Herman
Tarnower, the millionaire bachelor who
jilted her for a younger woman.
The sentence, ,for second-degree
murder, means she must serve at least
15 years before being considered for
parole unless she is given clemency by
the governor at some earlier time.
"I DID NOT murder Dr. Herman
Tarnower, but I loved him very much,"
the former headmistress of a Virginia
girls' school said in a clear voice. "I am
innocent as I stand here."
"I found you to be a brilliant
woman," Westchester County Court
Judge Russell Leggett told her. "But
the best I can say to you is, 'Best of
luck.' "
The judge added, "I wish that the
events of March 10 never took place and
that you'd never left Virginia."
The maximum sentence would have
been 25 years to life. Mrs. Harris
protested the sentence.
"For you to arrange my life so I'm
living in a cage every minute with irons
on is a travesty," she said.
fitymay gt
half million
_for fire safety
Continued from Page 1
reinstated, Ann Arbor in conjunction
with Ypsilanti and five other cities,
filed suit earlier this week against the
state in an attempt to recover funds to
pay for fire protection this fiscal year.
MILLIKEN VETOED the $3 million
program last January from this year's
budget.
Ann Arbor Mayor Louis Belcher said
the. loss of the $441,000 fire protection
subsidy caught local officials off guard.
The city will challenge the discon-
tinuance in court because it violates
certain provisions included in the
Headlee amendment, according to
Belcher.
Rep. Gary Owen (D-Ypsilanti), co-
sponsor of the bill, said Milliken vetoed
the fire appropriation because the
money would have gone primarily to
Democratic districts.
REP. PERRY Bullard (D-Ann Ar-
bor), agreed, adding, "It didn't matter
(to Milliken) that the mayor of Ann
Arbor is Republican."
Bullard charged that Ann Arbor's
"Republican mayor can't do a damn
thing to get money for the city from the
sitae" imnving thant nInlher did not

S

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WESLEY FOUNDATION
AT THE'UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN.
(313) 668-6881
602 E. Huron at State
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

I

A fellowship study and social, issues
ministry for the university community.
TOM SCHOMAKER, Chaplain/Di-
rector. ,
'ANN WILKINSON, Office Manager
This week's program:
Sunday, 5:30 Worship
6:00 Shared Meal
7:00 Program
Wednesday 8:00 p.m. Meditative
Prayer Group. Call 668-6881 for info.

Vol. XCI, No. 138
Saturday, March 21, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and nianaged by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. SubscriDtion rates: $6.50 in-Ann Arbor: S7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
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The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
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News room: (313) 764-0552. 76-DAILY: Sports desk. 764-0542: Circulation. 764.0558: Classified advertising
764-0557: Display advertising, 764-0554: Biling764.0550; Composing room. 764-0556. °

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

"Something is dead up the creek!" Certainly this is not
a refined, cultured, or elegant statement! But it carries a®
message very forceful and easily understood. The water
may not yet stink, but it is dangerous, not fit to drink,
liable to cause disease, an epidemic and death! Clean out
the cre ! No sane person will question these truths
concerning natural water so necessary for our existence
and life. Clean out the creek, purify the water, or we are
liable to perish.
Until recently we never knew that Alexander The Great
was badly defeated and ran away from one enemy.
Probably his greatest victory was in the battle of Arbela,
but a few days afterwards he and his army were running
away from an enemy - fiauratively, the enemy was

water springing up into everlasting life." John 4:13, 14.
It is the privilege and duty of the Christian not only to
drink of that water, but also to give to drink to the
famishing and thirsty, and whosoever will take it. Who,
and what is polluting this stream? Dante says the place in
hell prepared for those guilty of "heresy" was one of
awful stench and stink, from which there was no escape!
Do you know what "heresy" is? If we mistake not, the
word comes from one which means "choice" or "to
choose." In the Protestant Christian Church those guilty
are the ones who choose to believe the notions and
,devices of their own mind and heart, or the commands of
men, instead of "every word that proceedeth out of the
mouth of God," from lid to lid of the Bible. Man has the

Ir

Editor-in-chief ...
Monoging Editor.
University Editor.
Student Affairs Editor....
City Editor.
Opinion Page Editors.
Arts Editor....
Sports Editor .. .. ...: .
Executive Sports Editors...
*** o_.,,* .

..SARA ANSPACH
.....JULIE ENGEBRECHT
.ORENZO ENET
.....JOYCE FRIEDEN
ELAINE RIDEOUT
.DAVID MEYER
KEVIN TOTTIS
.ANNE GADON
.... MARK MIHANOVIC
GREG DEGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP

BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager... RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager................. BARB FORStUND
Operations Manager.. SUSANNEKELLY
Display Manager. ._ MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Assistant Display Manager NANCY JOSLIN
Classified Manager . DENISE SULLtVAN
Finance Manager.............. GREGG HADDAD
Nationals Manager ........... CATHY BAER
Soles Coordinator.. . . E.ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Bob Abrahoms Meg Armbruster
Joe Broda. Maureen DeLave. Judy Feinberg. Karen
Fr'edm'n. Peter Gotfredson Pamela Goud. Kathryn

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