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March 20, 1981 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 20, 1981-Page 11
'M' SHARP IN 9-0 WIN

Netter
By DAN NEWMAN
After a disappointing swing through
the Southwest, coach Brian Eisner's
netters got back on the winning track
yesterday as Michigan smashed
Kalamazoo College, 9-0, at the Track
and Tennis Building.
"They (Michigan) went after our
players like they hadn't eaten for three
days," said Kalamazoo coach George
Acker.
"I think our players built up some
confidence," said Eisner. "What hurt
us in the Texas matches was our lack of
experience.'
EISNER JUGGLED the Michigan
lineup by moving sophomore Mark
Mees up to the number one singles slot
and junior Mike Leach down to the
number three spot. These changes had
little bearing on the match as Mees
trounced Kalamazoo's Chris Burns 6-1,
6-2, while Leach soundly defeated his
opponent, Ven Johnson 6-1, 6-1.
In other singles competition, number
two senior Matt Horwitch whipped
Mark Riley 6-1, 6-1; freshman Ross
Laser handled Dave Cufmeyer 6-2, 6-1
at the number four position; in the
number five slot, Tom Haney swept Bill
Vanderhoef 6-1, 6-1; and Ihor Debryn
breezed to a 6-1, 6-0 win over Kevin
Johnson at the number six spot.
"Matt (Horwitch) placed a tremen-
dous amount of emphasis on his
movement in the off-season and I think

s sting
it really showed on the court," com-
mented Eisner.,,
Acker also had words of praise for the
senior from Highland Park, Illinois.
"He looks quicker and in my opinion he
has the best return of serve in the Big
Ten."
BUT WHAT impressed the opposing
coach most was the Michigan players
"professional" and "business-like at-
titude." "Those guys (Michigan) had
great competitive spirit. They really
went after every point."
Eisner attributed this attitude to
"competitive maturity." "You have to
totally respect your opponent," said
Eisner. "Your goal is to go out and play
every point as hard as you can and you
can't afford to be thinking about
anything but the job at hand."
Eisner's netters have won 13 con-.
secutive Big Ten titles, but this year's
team will have to manage without stan-
douts Jud Shaufler and Jack Neinken,
both of whom graduated. "We've got
good athletes, but some don't have
much college (tennis) experience down
in the later singles spots."
FRESHMAN ROSS Laser, a blue chip
recruit from Lincolnwood, Illinois, held
his own as he won his singles match and
then teamed with Haney at the number
two doubles position to post a 6-3, 6-3
victory over Kalamazoo's Vanderhoef-
and Ballantine.

fornets
"It's tough when you lose two of your
best players," commented Acker. "But
this Michigan team is just as good as
the past (Michigan) teams that I can
remember. The only thing they may be
lacking is depth."
Eisner believes that the losing road
trip (in Texas) served a useful purpose.
"Everyone worked hard and realized
that they have a lot to learn. We hadn't
had much practice for outside matches,
but those are the matches that make
you a better team, a better player, and
it allows you to make a better
evaluation."
In other play, the number one doubles
team of Horwitch and Leach ripped
Burns and Riley 6-3, 6-3, and the num-
ber, three doubles team of Dan
McLaughlin and Mees swept Kevin and
Johnson 6-0, 6-2.

SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1 PM
MICHIGAN THEATRE
$8.50 RESERVED
Tickets at Herb David's Guitar
Studios, Schoolkids' Records
and the Ark. No checks

'BORDERt,,
BOOK SHOP
cordially invites you to a Booksigning
with Ms. POGREBIN

old
ill*

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
MICHIGAN'S NUMBER ONE singles player Mark Mees drives'a forehand
.back toward Kalamazoo's Chris Burns. Mees upended Burns in straight sets,
6-t, 6-2.

C
0

a founding editor of Ms. magazine
worked with Mario Thomas on
Free to Eje You and Me

SA TURDA Y, March 21, 198!
11:30 to 12:30

A ,,-AMERICA N IIAS BRIGHT FUTURE:
Soph Neira a synchronized vet

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Raising your child
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t

By CHRIS WILSON
IJ',a few minutes before practice and
the members of Michigan's syn-
chronized swim team peer at the chart
*er coach Joyce Lindeman's shoulder
to see what they can expect in the next
feethours.
As sophomore swimmer Betsy Neira
joips the team on the pool deck, there
canĀ±be little mystery for her concerning
the schedule of practice routines. She's
beep. in synchronized swimming for
ovgrfifteen years.
"I TRY TO keep that quiet, though,"
says Neira, who was voted to the All-
*inerican team last year as a fresh-
mani. "It seems like such a long time to
dq;gnything."
While she talks, the chains of bouys
that separate the lanes are pulled from
th,,pool. A few minutes earlier that.
wategrwas: filled with. free-swinmers.
stiqiing laps.
j used to do speed swimming, too,
says Neira, "but just swimming in cir-
cles gets so tiresome. Here, there's a
chance to be more creative. You can
se your imagination."
WAND THE opportunities go 'beyond
just artistic expression. Last summer
Neira and her partner, Cathy O'Brien,
took' their duet routine to an inter-
national competition in Spain. They
placed third over a group of com-
petitors from around the world.
w'Spain was a lot of fun," says Neira
of her trip, "but it wasn't really like
being on a national team. I guess my
eal goal for the future would be a
hance to be on a top team, like the
national squad."

Unfortunately, one of those chances
came and went March 6-7 as the trials
for the national synchronized swim
team were held at Ohio State. Neira
swam, but narrowly missed a spot on
the squad.
"WELL, ACTUALLY I finished
23rd," says Neira with a sigh, as she

to Neira. The disappointment though, is
still there.
But that near miss is probably just a
temporary setback on a long road of
successes for the swimmer. The next
stop is a trip to Palo Alto, California for
the national championships at Stanford
University.
"I HOPE WE can do alright there,"
says Neira. "Right now our team is
ranked third in the nation behind Ohio
State and Arizona.
"Betsy should do just fine at
nationals," says Coach Lindeman.
"She's competing in the duet event,
trio, team, and senior figures."
While Neira works on her routines for
the upcoming national championships,
she can look forward to a probable spot
once All-American squad, her second
n as many sasons. beyond that tlere
are' two ni'e years to try for the
national team, summers full of
traveling to competitions, and from
there ...
"I don't know, the Olympics are a
long way away," says Meira. "That's
so much swimming between now and
then. I guess I'll just have to wait and
see."
It's six o'clock now and Neira
joins her team for practice. While most
of her classmates are facing the lines in
front of the dorm dining room, she is
facing the lines of the pool. But, as the
sophomore All-American begins. the
endless repetition of.her routines, one
thing is certain-she is not just swim-
ming in circles.

-- ---.-- ----
v. s.

:;.

<.
5..

Neira
... All-American

corrects Coach Lindeman's figure of
22nd.
Twenty-second or 23rd, it really
doesn't matter since only the top
eighteen finalists are chosen. Standing
four or five places back from that "top
team" can't make that much difference

4k

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OME-

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