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March 15, 1981 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-15

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 15, 1981-Page 3
H APPENINGS Soviets came

within inches'

of

SUNDAY
FILMS
Alternative Action - Cat Ballou, 7 p.m.; Barbarella, 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
AAFC/Cross Currents - Adrift, 7, 10:15 p.m.; The Hare Census, 9 p.m.,
MLB3.
Ann Arbor Film Festival - Winners' Night, 7, 9, 11 p.m., Michigan
Theatre.
Cinema II - Easter Parade, 7, 9p.m., Aud. A.
PERFORMANCES
University Musical Society - The New York Chamber Soloists, "A
Venetian Evening," 2:30p.m., Rackham Aud.
Canterbury Loft - The Caretaker, 8 p.m., 332 S. State.
MISCELLANEOUS
Extension Service-Stress in the University, conference, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.,
Michigan Union.
Union of Students for Israel - Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1 p.m., UGLI Multi-
purpose room.
Hillel-Israeli Folk Dancing, 1 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Greenpeace-Seal hunt postering campaign, 1 p.m., 4717 Michigan
Union.
Recreational Sports - Family Sunday Funday, "Family Aerobics," 2-5
p.m., NCRB.,
Sterns Lecture - "Instrumental Technology and Musical Change," 3
p.m., Sterns Building, Baits and Broadway avenues.
Armenian Student Association - Slide presentation, "Journey Through
Historic Armenia," 3 p.m., Michigan League.
Alpha Tau Omega-Fifth Annual Spaghetti Chowdown, 4-8 p.m., 1415
Cambridge.
Hillel - Kosher Deli Dinner, 68p.m,, 1429 Hill St.
Gay Discussion Group - City Council candidate forum, 6 p.m., Guild
House.
Wildlife Week - Sylvia Taylor, "Ospret," "A Time for Choice," 7:30 p.m.,
UGLI Multipurpose Room.
World Hunger - Frances Moore' Lappe, 8 p.m., Michigan .league
Ballroom.
Hillel - Hillel Hebrew Musicians, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
MONDAY
FILMS
AAFC - Nothing Sacred, 7 p.m.; Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, 8:30 p.m., Lor-
ch Hall Aud.
SPEAKERS
N. Eastern & N. African Studies - Charles Hornby, "The Baha'i Fath
Today," 12:10 p.m., Lane Hall Commons.
Education - C. Gordon Wells, "Language at Home and at School," 1 p.m.,
2219 SEB.
Applied Mechanics - G.M.L. Gladwell, "Thermoelastic Contact
Problems," 4 p.m., 246 W. Engin.
, Chemistry-David Hendrickson, "Electron Dynamics in Transition Metal
Complexes," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Computer Club- Hal Eckel, "MIS Opportunities at Owens Corning," 4
p.m., Hale Aud.
Energy Studies - Gunter Schramm, "Energy and Economic Develop-
ment in Southeast Asia," 4 p.m., 2102 MLB.
English -.Thomas Parkinson, "W. B. Yeats and Ezra Pound," 4pm,, 2433
K Mason.
W. European Studies - P.M. Mitchell, "Scandanavian Literature on the
Half Shell: 1918-1940," 4 p.m., 5208 Angell.
World Hunger - Ron Ferrell, "A Farewell to Farms: Michigan's
Agricultural Outlook," 7:$0 p.m., Wesley Foundation, 604 E. Huron.
Law Student Speakers Association - Paul Siegel, "Gay/Lesbian Rights
and the First Amendment," 7:30 p.m., Lawyers Club Lounge.
CREES - Eugenyi Afanasev, Yuri Mahmedov, "Soviet Foreign Policy,"
7:30 p.m., 2235 Angell.I
LSA-Clyde Coombs, "Patterns of Preference: Preferences for Sons and
Daughters: Cross Cultural Research," 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Reception follows.
Gender Studies - Barbara Smith, "The Literature of the Oppressed," 8
p.m., Rackham East Lecture Hall.
MEETINGS
SACUA - Meeting, 1:15 p.m., Rackham W. Alcove.
Med. Center Bible Study -12:15 p.m., W5603 Main Hospital, Nuclear Med.
Conf. Room.
Journal of Economics - Meeting, 4 p.m., 301 Econ.
Natural Resources - Environmental Advocacy informational meeting, 4-
6 p.m., 1040 Dana.
Senate Assembly - Monthly meeting, 4:15 p.m., Rackham amphitheatre.
Christian Science Org. - Meeting, 7:15 p.m., 3909 Union.
Bicycling Club - Meeting, 7:30 p.m., 1084 E. Engin.
Sierra Club - General meeting, on rock climbing, 7:30 p.m., Ann Arbor
Public Library.
Washtenaw Association for Retarded Citizens - Membership meeting,
7:30 p.m., High Point Cafetorium, 17355 Wagner Rd.
MISCELLANEOUS

Extension Service - Stress in the University, conference, 10 a.m.,
Michigan Union.
Counseling Services - Film; discussion, "Managing Stress," 11:45 A.M.,
1:30 p.m., 130 LSA.
Counseling Services - Faculty / Staff exploration of support services for
minority students, noon, Michigan Union, Anderson Room D.
CEW - Open House, careers in urban planning, 6-9 p.m., 328 Thompson.
Int. Folk Dance Club - Beg. teaching, 7-8:15 p.m., 3003 ELI.
Women's Studies Films - Women's health issues, 7 p.m., MLB 3.
Dharma Study Group - introductory talk, 7:30 p.m., 201 S. Main, Room
511.
Student Arts/Crafts Shop - Woodworking Workshop, 7-10 p.m., 537 SAB.
Wildlife Week - Ron Hoffman, "A GreatiWhite Bird," 7:30 p.m., Burns
Park School, 2nd floor auditorium.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of;
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MY., 48109.

invading
WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Soviet
Union came "within inches" of in-
vading Poland Dec. 3, 1980, but pulled
back at the last minute when the Polish
government asked for one more try at
straightening out its domestic
problems, U.S. and European sources
believe.
The sources said the Soviet invasion
would have been massive and well-
coordinated, involving other Eastern
European forces invoking their right to
keep a socialist country from breaking
rank.
ALTHOUGH U.S. intelligence reports
at the time showed Soviet military
preparations at their height, the United
States did not learn authoritatively of
the near-invasion until four ,days after
the critical point.
When the White House learned of the
close call, it issued a statement on Dec.
7, belatedly warning the Soviet Union of
the grave consequences of an action the
Soviets had already decided not to take.
American sources said the White
House was "just behind the curve" and
that the actual danger point had passed
when the warning was issued.
EARLIER, ON DEC. 4, the State
Department said in a statement, "We
have no indication that the Soviets have
reached a decision to intervene."
That was technically correct, since
the Soviet decision was not carried out.

Bu Poland'
But sources said the Soviet Union was
in a state of high military alert and its
forces had "come with inches" of an in-
vasion one day earlier, on Dec. 3.
The State Department did not know of
the close call 24 hours earlier.
THE TIMING OF the Soviet near-
invasion, the sources believe, was
related to the United States having a
lame-duck president who war preoc-
cupied with negotiations for the release
of the American hostages in Iran.
But the sources believe Polish party
leader Stanislaw Kania personally
talked the Soviet leadership out of the
invasion, promising that the Polish
Communist party could regain control
of the situation if it had outside
economic help. If the Soviets invaded,
Kania is believed to have warned, the
clock would be turned back 25 years in
Eastern Europe.
That view was reportedly supported
by some of the other Eastern European
states, particularly Hungary.
Two days after the crucial Dec. 3
date, the Soviet Union convenec a sur-
prise summit meeting ofthe Warsaw
Pact powers in Moscow, where Kania
explained his plans and needs to the
other eastern European leaders.
The Moscow summit resulted in war-
nings to the Polish trade unions, but it
also gave the Poles some short-term
economic help, amounting to about $1
billion in hard currency.

BOARD FOR
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
ELECTIONS
(Held with MSA Elections)
TWO STUDENT MEMBERSHIPS OPEN
" ONE MUST BE ENROLLED
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT
* ONE MUST BE ENROLLED
GRADUATE STUDENT
" TERM TWO YEARS
PETITIONS AT
MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY OFFICE
3rd FLOOR MICHIGAN UNION
DEADLINE TO FILE MARCH 17, 1981

Air traffic
controllers
contract
expires
WASHINGTON (UPI) - The air traf-
fic controllers union said yesterday its
17,000 members would neither go on
strike nor conduct a slowdown this
weekend, despite expiration of its con-
tract with the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration.
The current three-year agreement
between the FAA and Professional Air
Traffic Controllers Organization was
scheduled to expire at 12:01 a.m. EST
today.
NEGOTIATIONS WERE recessed on
Friday until tomorrow.
"There are no plans for a slowdown,
there are no plans for a walkout at this
time," said union spokesman Michael
Simons. "There are no plans for any
sort of a job action at the moment."
The union said, however, that infor-
mational pickets would begin ap-
pearing today at airports and flight
centers in 20 cities. The pickets would
be designed to make the public aware
that union members have chosen to
work under the terms of the expired
contract while negotiations continue.
SUCH INFORMATIONAL" picket-
ing is not considered by organized labor
as a bar to union members and sym-
pathizers from using the airline ser-
vices.
"There is no specific deadline at this
point, no set date, and PATCO intends
to remain at the table so long as fruitful
talks continue," Simons said.
The controllers who are federal em-
ployees, want wages higher than
federal scales, a reduction'in their
workweek from 40 hours to 32 hours, a
better retirement plan and a stronger
voice in safety-related matters such as
new equipment purchases.g
FAA officials have said an illegal
strike could take out 85 percent of the
workforce, forcing it to curtail
operations severely at the nation's 500
control towers and regional air route
control centers.
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photo
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"... the storm of applause and cheering
broke into a first-class hurcn.1
-Atlantic City Press
Preservation tall a-zilani
Mon day, March 23at 83
HllAdiorium
Tickets at: $8 All main floor, $7 All first balcony,
$6 2nd balcony, first 8 rows, $4 Remaining 2nd balcony.
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 (313) 665-3717
Tickets also available at Hill Auditorium
N' hours before performance time.
cj(IVE? SITYgMUSICALGW8CIETY
In Its 102nd Year

FACTORY
CLOSEOUTS
Swimwear,
Footwear,
Bodywear
406 E. Liberty
2 blocks off State St.

HOUSING REAPPLICATION
DRAWING
For students presently living in the residence
halls who wish to return to the residence
halls for the academic year 1981-82

TUES.,

March

17

-1:30

p.m.

Signing of leases.
TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
March 17-March 20

0 mi1-1mY- W Lis W U U "v I

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